Plus size models help normalise obesity, study reveals Watch

Doublletrouble
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#21
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Size 0 models in reality never existed and overweight vs curvy is something different and to be honest there aren't many "overweight" models you see walking on the catwalk in the first place. So the problem is clearly small scale
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Atlas_Shrugged
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#22
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High street shops should stop selling fat sizes. No women's clothes over size 12, no mens clothes above medium. Make these fatties go to shops dedicated to fat people. The shame of going there may encourage them to lose weight.
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whatsprogressive
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#23
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I think it depends on how you view it. I'm not quite sure how the straight community works, but in the gay community the primary driver for things such as eating disorders (which are fast rising outside the US at least) is that you find the body type more attractive. If anything it's easier to make sure people aren't fat/obese rather than focusing on normalising what is an unhealthy body shape.
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Sinnoh
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(Original post by Rock Fan)
Don't see how a woman having a bit of meat on them is an issue.
There is a difference, obviously, between having "a bit of meat on them" and obesity. That line is not a fine one either. It should be evident.
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Waldorf67
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#25
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(Original post by Rock Fan)
Don't see how a woman having a bit of meat on them is an issue.
You don’t see how obesity is a health issue?
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bobby147
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(Original post by Valkiyare)
You can be plus size and perfectly healthy but more often than not if you are stick thin you are going to be unhealthy. I feel like some ‘plus size’ models are actually regular size but called plus because they are not a Size 0.
No you cannot,this idea was contradicted by an Imperial College London study
https://www.imperial.ac.uk/news/1811...heart-disease/
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Spain!!!
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#27
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Being fat is bad
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Luke5125
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(Original post by Waldorf67)
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/...sity-epidemic/

Is this really such a surprise?

Running plus sized campaigns is a quick and easy marketing ploy given the ever increasing target market, however should this possibly be regulated?

There is now a lot of regulation regarding alcohol advertisement, and cigarette advertising is simply banned. However the obesity epidemic is set to supersede the health risks associated with smoking, and alcohol consumption, so why should this go unregulated?

I find with these campaigns, there is no in between. There is the usual, super fit and slim models who cover the mainstream campaigns, and then there’s the “plus size” range. There’s no place for regular, healthy bodies.

I find people are afraid to acknowledge the obesity epidemic for fear of coming across as prejuduce, but this is as much a health concern as any.

Fashion houses are absolutely slated for encouraging anorexia in the early 2000s, but incidences of anorexia are significantly outweighed by obesity figures.
The question is, 'Are you fat or what?'

If you aint fat, you aint nothin
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Gemma555
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#29
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I'm plus size! Wooo
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Underscore__
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#30
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(Original post by Valkiyare)
You can be plus size and perfectly healthy but more often than not if you are stick thin you are going to be unhealthy. I feel like some ‘plus size’ models are actually regular size but called plus because they are not a Size 0.
1. Plus sized models aren’t regular size
2. The average person in the U.K. is overweight so being regular sized is bad
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username3882216
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#31
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?That isn't a good thingWork outIt ain't pretty
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Valkiyare
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#32
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I’ve had friends who’ve had severe eating disorders and almost died so I’d rather have slightly tubby models than stick thin models who make young girls almost die of a heart attack because they feel fat 🙃
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Waldorf67
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#33
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(Original post by Valkiyare)
I’ve had friends who’ve had severe eating disorders and almost died so I’d rather have slightly tubby models than stick thin models who make young girls almost die of a heart attack because they feel fat 🙃
You are very ignorant if you genuinely believe that death caused by anorexia is a sole result of seeing thin models in the media.

Anorexia nervosa is a highly complex mental health disorder, and most sufferers would find it borderline offensive, for you to suggest that their disorder simply results from a desire to look like those models. Do not reduce it to that extent.

It may manifest itself that way, but there is a hell of a lot more to it than that. It’s almost patronising for you to say that those girls nearly lost their lives because of skinny models.
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Valkiyare
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(Original post by Waldorf67)
You are very ignorant if you genuinely believe that death caused by anorexia is a sole result of seeing thin models in the media.

Anorexia nervosa is a highly complex mental health disorder, and most sufferers would find it borderline offensive, for you to suggest that their disorder simply results from a desire to look like those models. Do not reduce it to that extent.

It may manifest itself that way, but there is a hell of a lot more to it than that.
I’m not saying thin models cause it, but they sure as hell don’t help
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Waldorf67
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(Original post by Valkiyare)
I’m not saying thin models cause it, but they sure as hell don’t help
No, that is exactly what you said.
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fallen_acorns
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The eating disorder arguement ( in favour of plus sized models) is stupid.

1. You don't need to have either fat or super thin models, you can just have healthy ones in the middle.

2. Even if it was a choice between one or the other.. the number of people who suffer due to eating disorders is tiny compared to those who do and will die and suffer due to obesity. Any logical person would choose the optIon that leads to less obesity even if it meant a few more eating disorders
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MongoDB
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Well no ****.

On a related note, has anyone ever seen a "plus size" male model? I certainly haven't, and I have absolutely no desire to. It's almost as if this plus size model movement is a ploy by women who don't bother to control their daily caloric intake to force society to see them as equally beautiful to those that do, but that's obviously just crazy talk.
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FloralHybrid
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(Original post by Waldorf67)
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/...sity-epidemic/

Is this really such a surprise?

Running plus sized campaigns is a quick and easy marketing ploy given the ever increasing target market, however should this possibly be regulated?

There is now a lot of regulation regarding alcohol advertisement, and cigarette advertising is simply banned. However the obesity epidemic is set to supersede the health risks associated with smoking, and alcohol consumption, so why should this go unregulated?

I find with these campaigns, there is no in between. There is the usual, super fit and slim models who cover the mainstream campaigns, and then there’s the “plus size” range. There’s no place for regular, healthy bodies.

I find people are afraid to acknowledge the obesity epidemic for fear of coming across as prejuduce, but this is as much a health concern as any.

Fashion houses are absolutely slated for encouraging anorexia in the early 2000s, but incidences of anorexia are significantly outweighed by obesity figures.
The issue is at what point do we become obese, as BMI isn’t a great measure. Most of these “plus size” models, are a U.K. size 14-18. Which is what a huge majority of women are. It’s not about normalising obesity, it’s about normalising body shapes that aren’t what we see perfectly photoshopped or walking down the runway.
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username3832246
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(Original post by Rock Fan)
Rather a plus size model than a stick thin one personally.
(Original post by Valkiyare)
You can be plus size and perfectly healthy but more often than not if you are stick thin you are going to be unhealthy. I feel like some ‘plus size’ models are actually regular size but called plus because they are not a Size 0.
These "stick thin" models are usually healthy - they're tall with thin bone structure.
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Waldorf67
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(Original post by FloralHybrid)
The issue is at what point do we become obese, as BMI isn’t a great measure. Most of these “plus size” models, are a U.K. size 14-18. Which is what a huge majority of women are. It’s not about normalising obesity, it’s about normalising body shapes that aren’t what we see perfectly photoshopped or walking down the runway.
If I was a size 14-18 I would be informed by my doctor to lose weight, absolutely no doubt about it.

The fact that you don’t recognise that a significant number of women are size 18 to be an issue is a concern. A size 18 on a woman with the average height of 5 foot 4/5 is morbidly obese.
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