Plus size models help normalise obesity, study reveals Watch

ThomH97
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#81
Report 8 months ago
#81
(Original post by AngryRedhead)
Most fat people I know don't give a crap about what society thinks of them so obviously it doesn't even register in some cases
Do you think there are some fat people who try to get healthy every now and again, but won't bother with that if they see fat people's fatness being publicly praised?
0
reply
Wibble1990
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#82
Report 4 weeks ago
#82
(Original post by Waldorf67)
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/...sity-epidemic/

Is this really such a surprise?

Running plus sized campaigns is a quick and easy marketing ploy given the ever increasing target market, however should this possibly be regulated?

There is now a lot of regulation regarding alcohol advertisement, and cigarette advertising is simply banned. However the obesity epidemic is set to supersede the health risks associated with smoking, and alcohol consumption, so why should this go unregulated?

I find with these campaigns, there is no in between. There is the usual, super fit and slim models who cover the mainstream campaigns, and then there’s the “plus size” range. There’s no place for regular, healthy bodies.

I find people are afraid to acknowledge the obesity epidemic for fear of coming across as prejuduce, but this is as much a health concern as any.

Fashion houses are absolutely slated for encouraging anorexia in the early 2000s, but incidences of anorexia are significantly outweighed by obesity figures.
People should strive to be super slim or fit. Plus size models are basically anything over a size 14. If you're six foot tall you're probably healthy. If you're five foot tall, you're probably overweight. People both fat shame and skinny shame but it's at the point now of people at the upper limit of the heathy BMI weight range being 'skinny shamed' despite being on the cusp of being overweight. This is not okay. People shouldn't mock or shame one another for their amount of bodily fat or lack of. I pay more attention to people around me than models. How often does anyone ever really look at models modelling anyhow? Avoid shamers and their taunting and pursue excellence in every aspect of your life.
0
reply
-Eirlys-
  • Community Assistant
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#83
Report 4 weeks ago
#83
(Original post by Waldorf67)
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/...sity-epidemic/

Is this really such a surprise?

Running plus sized campaigns is a quick and easy marketing ploy given the ever increasing target market, however should this possibly be regulated?

There is now a lot of regulation regarding alcohol advertisement, and cigarette advertising is simply banned. However the obesity epidemic is set to supersede the health risks associated with smoking, and alcohol consumption, so why should this go unregulated?

I find with these campaigns, there is no in between. There is the usual, super fit and slim models who cover the mainstream campaigns, and then there’s the “plus size” range. There’s no place for regular, healthy bodies.

I find people are afraid to acknowledge the obesity epidemic for fear of coming across as prejuduce, but this is as much a health concern as any.

Fashion houses are absolutely slated for encouraging anorexia in the early 2000s, but incidences of anorexia are significantly outweighed by obesity figures.
I agree with you and they're just showing them to make it appear like they're accepting of everyone. Topshop recently showed a plus sized model and people commented on their post saying that they don't even accommodate that size range! I recently visited Topshop and it seems their biggest size is a 12 and they go right down to xs, so it's clear that Topshop are just trying to make themselves look like they're accepting all sizes but they're not doing that in reality.
I really don't know why these shops can't just have average sized models who are in a healthy BMI range - no-one too skinny and no-one too fat. At least then, if people complained about lack of diversity, they could say that they're showing people of healthy weight ranges and refuse to show people of unhealthy weight, so then people who are so easily influenced by ads (which I don't understand) will aim to aspire to be a healthy weight. But then people would complain that not everyone is in a healthy weight range so shops should represent them. I don't know why shops now have this requirement to represent every single person/customer in their ads.

(Original post by Rock Fan)
Rather a plus size model than a stick thin one personally.
But they're both representing unhealthy body weights? What about average sized people instead, who are in the healthy BMI range?

(Original post by Valkiyare)
You can be plus size and perfectly healthy but more often than not if you are stick thin you are going to be unhealthy. I feel like some ‘plus size’ models are actually regular size but called plus because they are not a Size 0.
You can be plus sized and healthy and you can be very thin and healthy, but both weight ranges increase the likelihood of getting certain diseases and health problems i.e. diabetes, cancer for obese people, nutritional deficiencies in very thin people.
2
reply
Andrew97
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#84
Report 4 weeks ago
#84
(Original post by hannxm)
I agree with you and they're just showing them to make it appear like they're accepting of everyone. Topshop recently showed a plus sized model and people commented on their post saying that they don't even accommodate that size range! I recently visited Topshop and it seems their biggest size is a 12 and they go right down to xs, so it's clear that Topshop are just trying to make themselves look like they're accepting all sizes but they're not doing that in reality.
I really don't know why these shops can't just have average sized models who are in a healthy BMI range - no-one too skinny and no-one too fat. At least then, if people complained about lack of diversity, they could say that they're showing people of healthy weight ranges and refuse to show people of unhealthy weight, so then people who are so easily influenced by ads (which I don't understand) will aim to aspire to be a healthy weight. But then people would complain that not everyone is in a healthy weight range so shops should represent them. I don't know why shops now have this requirement to represent every single person/customer in their ads.



But they're both representing unhealthy body weights? What about average sized people instead, who are in the healthy BMI range?



You can be plus sized and healthy and you can be very thin and healthy, but both weight ranges increase the likelihood of getting certain diseases and health problems i.e. diabetes, cancer for obese people, nutritional deficiencies in very thin people.
BMI is not a good measure of anything to be honest.
0
reply
yudothis
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#85
Report 4 weeks ago
#85
What a surprise...
0
reply
Archurus23
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#86
Report 2 weeks ago
#86
(Original post by Waldorf67)
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/...sity-epidemic/

Is this really such a surprise?

Running plus sized campaigns is a quick and easy marketing ploy given the ever increasing target market, however should this possibly be regulated?

There is now a lot of regulation regarding alcohol advertisement, and cigarette advertising is simply banned. However the obesity epidemic is set to supersede the health risks associated with smoking, and alcohol consumption, so why should this go unregulated?

I find with these campaigns, there is no in between. There is the usual, super fit and slim models who cover the mainstream campaigns, and then there’s the “plus size” range. There’s no place for regular, healthy bodies.

I find people are afraid to acknowledge the obesity epidemic for fear of coming across as prejuduce, but this is as much a health concern as any.

Fashion houses are absolutely slated for encouraging anorexia in the early 2000s, but incidences of anorexia are significantly outweighed by obesity figures.
Not a surprise at all. This is objectively a bad thing
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Where do you need more help?

Which Uni should I go to? (129)
17.94%
How successful will I become if I take my planned subjects? (73)
10.15%
How happy will I be if I take this career? (124)
17.25%
How do I achieve my dream Uni placement? (104)
14.46%
What should I study to achieve my dream career? (70)
9.74%
How can I be the best version of myself? (219)
30.46%

Watched Threads

View All