Top doctors say we should pay for GP and hospital visits Watch

MR1999
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'The BMA will vote next week on whether to lobby the Government to introduce alternative ways to fund the NHS.'

You can read the full article here.

EDIT: The BMA have voted this down and have voted in support of increasing taxes.
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CoolCavy
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People shouldnt be charged for needing to see a GP, but they should be fined for intentionally missing appointments
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999tigger
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(Original post by MR1999)
'The BMA will vote next week on whether to lobby the Government to introduce alternative ways to fund the NHS.'

You can read the full article here: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/201...s-leading/amp/

It also helps people be more accountable and not miss appointments.
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RickHendricks
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the TOP people predicted Germany win Mexico.

They won't always be right, and at most situations they will try and steer things in their favour.
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AsalaR
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I say we charge a fee to everyone over 60 for voting brexit.
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CoolCavy
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Also what about people who have ongoing health issues who need to see a GP regularly, i couldn't afford £5 or £25 or however much they are proposing :/
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Reue
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Do we also get a tax cut from the savings?
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FutureMissMRCS
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ecolier


^ Would be interesting to see what you have to say on the matter
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Magdatrix >_<
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I don't think we should pay - it would promote a culture of not seeking help for those who can't afford it, inevitably leading to more costly visits when easily-treatable conditions go unchecked and develop into something worse!

A small fine for missed appointments might be appropriate but difficult to enforce. In addition, who gets to decide whether someone has missed it intentionally/by being daft, versus because of another emergency or because of actual health or mobility problems?
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math24601
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Wtf I hope they don’t. I’d definitely say bring in a fine for missing appointments though - even if it’s not intentional. Maybe it could be on a “strike” system so you can miss one a year without a fine or something? But any more than that and you pay £20? Idk
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CoolCavy
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(Original post by Magdatrix >_<)
I don't think we should pay - it would promote a culture of not seeking help for those who can't afford it, inevitably leading to more costly visits when easily-treatable conditions go unchecked and develop into something worse!

A small fine for missed appointments might be appropriate but difficult to enforce. In addition, who gets to decide whether someone has missed it intentionally/by being daft, versus because of another emergency or because of actual health or mobility problems?
agree
with my surgery (idk about others) they have a text service and if you cant come you can just text CANCEL to their number (not sure what the cut off is but is pretty last minute) but people still miss appointments because they cba to text these are the people that should be fined imo
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SCIENCE :D
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(Original post by Anonymous)
How about raise awareness about the dangers of Alcohol and train the youth against this barbaric , soulless culture of getting 'wasted'.
Obesity is a much bigger problem than alcohol. Stop trying to push your religion on others.
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Drewski
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Should be retrospective and on a scale.

If it's self inflicted then you've a- got a long wait (unless life threatening, obvs, not an animal), and b- expensive fee to teach you not to be a bloody idiot.
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ecolier
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(Original post by MR1999)
'The BMA will vote next week on whether to lobby the Government to introduce alternative ways to fund the NHS.'

You can read the full article here.
Yes I will be part of the voting members - will let you know how it goes (arguments for and against). I may even be speaking
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Democracy
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Misleading headline and thread title. This hasn't been voted on yet and isn't the BMA's official stance on the matter; it is the position of some local GP committees and the head of a private medical school. "Top doctors" is such a nutty media term.

That said, there are a good number of doctors who would support the introduction of such measures (or at least, not be against it), but I would be quite surprised if this is adopted as the BMA's official position any time soon.
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Anonymous #2
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Yes to a fine for missing appointments (unless you can prove that there was no way whatsoever you cod be there or cancel) but no to paying to see the GP to begin with. It'll lead to more people shrugging off health issues and just hoping it goes away, if for no other reason than if it is something serious it could get worse than it needs to and potentially cost more money to heal. Plus some patients have to go to the GP, for example my mother recently had knee surgery and the person the hospital told her to go see for check ups and questions was the local GP, I have a friend with a genetic condition that regularly affects her joints and she needs to stay in contact with her GP in case it gets worse and I personally habe a knee condition and get migraines and my GP has asked that I just drop by and update her once a month as to whether I got a migraine since the last checkup and if my medication is working fine or if my knee is getting better/worse.
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MR1999
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(Original post by Democracy)
Misleading headline and thread title. This hasn't been voted on yet and isn't the BMA's official stance on the matter; it is the position of some local GP committees and the head of a private medical school. "Top doctors" is such a nutty media term.

That said, there are a good number of doctors who would support the introduction of such measures (or at least, not be against it), but I would be quite surprised if this is adopted as the BMA's official position any time soon.
Whoops, that's my bad. The headline says 'leading doctors' not 'top doctors', although that is very subjective as well. My aim was just to paraphrase the article's headline, which I do agree is rather clickbaity, as headlines often are.

However, the first post does clearly state that a vote is yet to take place and so it, as of yet, is not an official stance of the BMA.
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MR1999
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(Original post by FutureMissMRCS)
ecolier


^ Would be interesting to see what you have to say on the matter
What do you have to say on it?
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FutureMissMRCS
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(Original post by MR1999)
What do you have to say on it?
Well Im not an expert on this so please correct me if what I say is wrong I feel a bit like it goes against my moral principles-free healthcare.I think healthcare is a human right,so don't feel comfortable about the whole idea of paying for healthcare. But then I see why they're doing it but I would prefer they would use some other way to fund the NHS-even though I myself have not come up with the solution I know they said it will probably something like £5-£10 or something like that (someone correct me if Im wrong) which is not too much-but is there a different way they could get the funding?I just feel like it goes against the principles of the NHS too: (taken directly from NHS website)

'The NHS was created out of the ideal that good healthcare should be available to all, regardless of wealth. When it was launched by the then minister of health, Aneurin Bevan, on July 5 1948, it was based on 3 core principles:
  • that it meet the needs of everyone
  • that it be free at the point of delivery
  • that it be based on clinical need, not ability to pay

'
Im sorry if any of this is incorrect,Im still reading up on this and trying to be more informed.
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CHANELDIAMONDS
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(Original post by SCIENCE :D)
Obesity is a much bigger problem than alcohol. Stop trying to push your religion on others.
This could literally be an atheist... anyone who disagrees with Alcohol is pushing their religion on others?
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