Ndanji678
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Y12_FurtherMaths
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Which part are you struggling on?
What have you tried so far?
Do you understand transformations of graphs?
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Pizza32
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That is a very beautiful question
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Pizza32
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1)expand the brackets and plot the quadratic curve
2)transform the graphs- if you can’t then you’ll need to learn that first
3)then just find the equations of the new curves
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Ndanji678
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(Original post by Y12_FurtherMaths)
Which part are you struggling on?
What have you tried so far?
Do you understand transformations of graphs?
I’ll look into transformations,I need help for b and c.
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Y12_FurtherMaths
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(Original post by Pizza32)
1)expand the brackets and plot the quadratic curve
2)transform the graphs- if you can’t then you’ll need to learn that first
3)then just find the equations of the new curves
You don’t need to expand the brackets for part a unless they want the turning point too
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Ndanji678
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(Original post by Y12_FurtherMaths)
Which part are you struggling on?
What have you tried so far?
Do you understand transformations of graphs?
No I don’t
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Y12_FurtherMaths
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(Original post by Ndanji678)
I’ll look into transformations,I need help for b and c.
If you look at transformations of graphs you can easily answer part b. Then once you have sketched them work out the new equation of the curve
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Ndanji678
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(Original post by Y12_FurtherMaths)
If you look at transformations of graphs you can easily answer part b
Thanks a lot.
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Ndanji678
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(Original post by Pizza32)
1)expand the brackets and plot the quadratic curve
2)transform the graphs- if you can’t then you’ll need to learn that first
3)then just find the equations of the new curves
So how do I find the graph of the vertical translation?
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Ndanji678
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(Original post by Y12_FurtherMaths)
If you look at transformations of graphs you can easily answer part b. Then once you have sketched them work out the new equation of the curve
I managed to plot the graph for the horizontal translation but need help on how to plot the vertical translation.
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Y12_FurtherMaths
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(Original post by Ndanji678)
I managed to plot the graph for the horizontal translation but need help on how to plot the vertical translation.
f(x)+2 means the graph translates upwards by 2 units. This can be achieved by isolating specific points on the graph and moving them 2 places upwards then redrawing the graph. Essentially you are just adding 2 to each y coordinate
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Ndanji678
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(Original post by Y12_FurtherMaths)
f(x)+2 means the graph translates upwards by 2 units. This can be achieved by isolating specific points on the graph and moving them 2 places upwards then redrawing the graph. Essentially you are just adding 2 to each y coordinate
So that’s how they got this?Name:  0E5D72F2-1878-4C8B-AEFF-DA2653E7D16C.jpg.jpeg
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Y12_FurtherMaths
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(Original post by Ndanji678)
So that’s how they got this?Name:  0E5D72F2-1878-4C8B-AEFF-DA2653E7D16C.jpg.jpeg
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Looks correct to me.
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Ndanji678
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(Original post by Y12_FurtherMaths)
Looks incorrect to me. f(x)+2 does not effect your x coordinates therefore the roots of the curve should still be at (-2,0) and (1,0) which is not the case in that diagram
Thanks a lot,I got the same points but was comparing to the answer in this edexcel book making me feel like I got it incorrect.
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Y12_FurtherMaths
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(Original post by Ndanji678)
Thanks a lot,I got the same points but was comparing to the answer in this edexcel book making me feel like I got it incorrect.


Edit: I have a strange feeling I’ve been taught this wrong. I believe they got that answer in the diagram by multiplying out the brackets, adding 2 to the result then factorising again to get the new roots. I believe this is the way it’s been done and is the correct way. Sorry for the hassle, I blame my teacher 😞.

CORRECT METHOD:
Expand f(x) to get x^2 x -2. You then need to add 2 since it wants the function of x and 2 more. This now cancels to get x^2 x. We set this to zero if we want the roots. We factorise to get x(x 1)=0 giving us roots of (0,0) and (-1,0).
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Ndanji678
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(Original post by Y12_FurtherMaths)
Sorry mate I’m a bit confused now. f(x) + a means a translation in the y direction by a vector (0,a) so you add ‘a’ amounts to each y coordinate. But when I used my graphical calculator I get the same graph you provided in the diagram so I’m confused now mate, sorry
I’m confused as well mate,maybe you know some people who can help? Or will you be able to get the answer?
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Y12_FurtherMaths
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(Original post by Ndanji678)
I’m confused as well mate,maybe you know some people who can help? Or will you be able to get the answer?
Read my edited post ^ sorry for the hassle
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Ndanji678
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(Original post by Y12_FurtherMaths)
Sorry mate I’m a bit confused now. f(x) a means a translation in the y direction by a vector (0,a) so you add ‘a’ amounts to each y coordinate. But when I used my graphical calculator I get the same graph you provided in the diagram so I’m confused now mate, sorry.

Edit: I have a strange feeling I’ve been taught this wrong. I believe they got that answer in the diagram by multiplying out the brackets, adding 2 to the result then factorising again to get the new roots. I believe this is the way it’s been done and is the correct way. Sorry for the hassle, I blame my teacher 😞.

CORRECT METHOD:
Expand f(x) to get x^2 x -2. You then need to add 2 since it wants the function of x and 2 more. This now cancels to get x^2 x. We set this to zero if we want the roots. We factorise to get x(x 1)=0 giving us roots of (0,0) and (-1,0).
Thanks a lot bruv.
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Y12_FurtherMaths
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(Original post by Ndanji678)
Thanks a lot bruv.
No worries! Boy am I glad this type of transformation didn’t come up on our exam because our teacher taught us it incorrectly! As if!
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