Should I buy the books of my set texts or the analysis books of my set texts?

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username3558104
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#1
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I've started the GCSE English Literature course and have been told that we will have some set texts. Should I buy the actual book (eg An Inspector Calls) or should I get the analysis revision guides of it? (eg CGP Macbeth Text Guide)

I'm also very lost on where if I do buy a text guide, which version is best? I'm sure some of the experts of English here (I'm not very good at it) should know.

If I do buy the actual book, what version of the book should I get? I'm open to any recommendations.

Thanks in advance!
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absolutelysprout
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i'd get both the set text and the revision guide if i were you. makes it a lot easier to make your own notes on certain things.
unless the teachers have copies of the set text they're willing to give you:dontknow:
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(Original post by entertainmyfaith)
i'd get both the set text and the revision guide if i were you. makes it a lot easier to make your own notes on certain things.
unless the teachers have copies of the set text they're willing to give you:dontknow:
This would be something I would be open to, but I don't have loads of space in my room so I wanna get the least amount of revision guides for each subject possible. I'll be buying books for other subjects alongisde this. Essentially, I'm just looking for an efficient book to provide me with quotes and analysis for the exam, but I don't want to be limited to using websites for books and such.
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absolutelysprout
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(Original post by seriouslygcse)
This would be something I would be open to, but I don't have loads of space in my room so I wanna get the least amount of revision guides for each subject possible. I'll be buying books for other subjects alongisde this. Essentially, I'm just looking for an efficient book to provide me with quotes and analysis for the exam, but I don't want to be limited to using websites for books and such.
ah, i see. analysis revision guides might be more useful but at the same time you can find a lot of resources online:dontknow: do you think it would benefit you more if you had the revision guide or the set texts?
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username4094562
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#5
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(Original post by seriouslygcse)
I've started the GCSE English Literature course and have been told that we will have some set texts. Should I buy the actual book (eg An Inspector Calls) or should I get the analysis revision guides of it? (eg CGP Macbeth Text Guide)

I'm also very lost on where if I do buy a text guide, which version is best? I'm sure some of the experts of English here (I'm not very good at it) should know.

If I do buy the actual book, what version of the book should I get? I'm open to any recommendations.

Thanks in advance!
It is definitely useful to get a good edition of the set text as you can annotate it yourself. I would recommend the Penguin Modern Classics edition as Penguin tend to do the best editions of classics.

In terms of revision guides, I think they are a waste of money as they just give a generic analysis of the book and don't really go into detail about the themes of the text. I think reading biographies of the author, as well as articles online are more useful. You can find many articles online about your text which you can read for free. These ones are really good.

https://www.bl.uk/20th-century-liter...itical-journey

https://www.bl.uk/20th-century-liter...nspector-calls

The J.B. Priestley Society is also very useful if you want more information on the author and context behind 'An Inspector Calls.'

http://www.jbpriestleysociety.com/fo...-and-teachers/
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MKBH
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#6
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Buy whichever edition of the book you're reading in class. Trust me, when I did Inspector Calls a bunch of girls in my class got a different version with annotations and they couldn't keep up with the rest of the class in terms of actually reading. Buy the actual books for lessons and then use websites and online resources and whatever the teacher gives you in class for analysis stuff.
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username3558104
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#7
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Thanks for the advice everyone! I've made my mind up that I'll buy the set texts as they are since I can find analysis of them online with quotes.
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