How has your faith changed during your life?

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Poll: Have you religions views changed in your lifetime?
Yes, to another religion (4)
6.25%
Yes, to atheism/agnosticism (16)
25%
No, I follow the same faith (31)
48.44%
No, I've always been atheist/agnostic (6)
9.38%
Yes, from atheism/agnosticism to a faith (7)
10.94%
Other (please specify) (0)
0%
shadowdweller
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#1
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#1
Whether you're raised into a certain religion, join one late in life, or even switch to a different faith entirely, it's fair to say our spiritual views can change significantly during our lifetimes, and often continue to do so.

In your life so far, how have your views changed? And if there was a cause for the change, what was it?
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TheWiseFool
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#2
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#2
Shouldn't atheism/agnosticism to a religion be a main option?
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username2424985
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#3
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#3
Raised a Catholic, stopped believing a few days after my first communion at the age of 8, after reading a Horrible Science book about the Big Bang.
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shadowdweller
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#4
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#4
(Original post by TheWiseFool)
Shouldn't atheism/agnosticism to a religion be a main option?
That's a good point! I'll add it shortly
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dartagnankillian
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#5
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#5
Christian > Atheist > Agnostic/ Buddhist
They only changed as I’ve grown and learnt more about the world and beliefs, and found the one that just clicks with my gut feeling
(Those arrows don’t mean to represent greater than, btw)
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Golden State
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#6
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#6
Muslim > Atheist > Christian

Well, I would say that I'm a lot happier since becoming a Christian. The Bible's been a great source of wisdom and Jesus is a great cornerstone in my life. I can't see myself going back to the other belief systems, because I'm just a big fan of Jesus and his teachings. Being an Atheist for a large part of my formative years always left me feeling like I was missing something in my life, and I think that in the UK there's a real aversion to faith in general, as religion is often seen as a negative thing. But, ever since I've become a Christian I feel as though new opportunities have opened for me in different areas of my life, and that through grace of God I've been able to overcome many challenges in my life, and see the world through a different lens.

It is hard as a lot of Churches here in the UK are quite cliquish, and there are not many people my age. But, whenever I'm feeling down, I always go to the Bible for some wisdom and guidance. For me it's about having a relationship with a loving creator, and trying to be Christ like, and so embodying those Biblical values, such as being compassionate, forgiving and loving towards other human beings.
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The_Lonely_Goatherd
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#7
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#7
I've stayed within the same faith (Roman Catholic) but I think my faith has both deepened and matured, which are both good things :jebus:
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iwininmyroom
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#8
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Hinduism is very cultural in that a huge chunk of it isn't theological (e.g. cow politics). I don't think Hinduism is even an Indian construction, for the traditional thinking it would just be all separated out into "dharma, temples, festivals" etc without merging it into a single concept. The idea of Hinduism was actually a Middle Eastern invention to describe the foriegn culture of India. Hindia was the Muslim name for India and Hinduism was its culture. I think that most of western society unfairly discriminates against Hindus and Hinduism and then creates more racism by providing affirmative action for the Muslim community.
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username1221160
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#9
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#9
I was brought up in a very Christian household and went to a Christian school. It turned me into a hardcore atheist with a real contempt for organised religion.


Incidentally, the two vicars that preached religion to me ended up in prison. One for child porn offences and one for attacking his wife with a hammer.

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/v...e-1139030.html
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username1732491
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#10
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#10
Christian to Deist to Agnostic Atheist. Eventually realised that, while the idea of God is reasonable, the Christian faith just doesn't hold up with what we know today. Became a deist before deciding that a god is too specific, it feels as if there’s something supernatural that we don’t know much about yet, but the idea of a god just doesn’t really fit the universe we see, at least an all powerful one. I may end up taking the same path dartagnankillian took, I’m not quite sure at the moment though. The only thing I’m sure about is that I’m done with Christianity, I’ve heard enough from both sides to know that it is mostly rubbish.
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username4094562
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#11
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#11
Muslim> Agnostic> Atheist> Spiritual

I've always been interested in belief systems. I was brought up in a very strictly orthodox interpretation of Islam. I hated the rigid beliefs that my parents imposed on me. Some of their views were just morally wrong imo so I left Islam. Agnosticism felt too ambiguous for me so I turned atheist but I didn't really agree with atheist ideas either. To me, atheism seemed too rigid just like orthodox Islam. I also didn't agree with the ideas of major atheist thinkers like Sartre. I started to read some poetry of Rumi and became interested in Sufism. I think Sufism best represents my views in regards to faith. I prefer to call myself spiritual now rather than religious as I don't really follow one particular religion.
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gjd800
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#12
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#12
Raised Roman Catholic (with the usual Irish bent on it) but it was never a distinctive force in my life. I never got confirmed or anything like that, and now I spend all my days 'doing' Indian philosophy and religion and might be described as loosely Buddhist, at least in philosophical terms.
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shadowdweller
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#13
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#13
For those of you whose views haven't changed, have there been points at which you've considered changing, or strongly questioned your views?
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The_Lonely_Goatherd
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#14
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#14
(Original post by shadowdweller)
For those of you whose views haven't changed, have there been points at which you've considered changing, or strongly questioned your views?
I have spent most of my life (since Sunday School as a child) questioning everything about my faith I have, at points, wondered whether I should convert to Anglicanism. Some of my beliefs are more aligned with Quakerism than Roman Catholicism but I could never be a Quaker :nah:
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Sheldon'sGotCake
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#15
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#15
(Original post by shadowdweller)
For those of you whose views haven't changed, have there been points at which you've considered changing, or strongly questioned your views?
I voted for the "No, I've always been atheist/agnostic" option but I did use to go to church at some point... Not by choice. I had to go because I was being taken care of by my grandparents at the time.

I've always questioned religion. It always seems to change with the worldviews or generation.

Edit: I feel like we as a species would be progressing a lot faster without religion, to be honest. :^_^:
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44park
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#16
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#16
Went from agnostic->theist but no religion-> Islam-> doubted Islam again-> Islam
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Trapz99
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#17
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#17
Well my parents are Hindu but I never really believed in any form of Hinduism. I learnt more about Christianity in school and online and I decided to accept Jesus Christ as my Lord and Saviour when I was 16. I’m grateful that I found God so early in my life and I hope that my faith will strengthen over time.
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londonmyst
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#18
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#18
The majority of British people are committed to religious pluralism and value the fantastic contribution the Hindu community make to this country.
I visited the Neasden Temple Mandir when I was at school and visit Southall every Diwali because the celebrations are so lively and the atmosphere amazingly welcoming.

Its the monotheistic fundamentalists that are prejudiced against Hindu beliefs because of the polytheistic and murti aspects of Hinduism.
My ultra traditionalist catholic grandmother falls into that category but then she is a religious fanatic who hates everyone that believes something different to her- specially her family.

The ideology behind the inept, totally counterproductive "positive discrimination" legislation does not mention any specific religious groups and is not even intended to favour any specific religion or even religion as a whole above ethnicity, gender or sexual orientation.
But a small number of very vocal individuals and aggressive unpleasant groups aggressively demand special treatment- accompanied with the threat of allegations of bigotry and abuse in the event of non-compliance.

It's tragic that the loudmouth idiots are pandered to- when so many other people from all communities are opposed to the idea of being hired or provided any assistance at all based on demographic features.
Two female Hindu friends of mine at opposite levels of the religious spectrum turned down job offers when told they were being prioritized based on religious heritage and gender. From my experience this is typical of the British Hindu community who never impose on anyone or seek any special treatment.
A male Sikh friend angrily did the same thing when he was offered project funding after an interview that only discussed his ancestry and religious beliefs- nothing about his project.



(Original post by iwininmyroom)
Hinduism is very cultural in that a huge chunk of it isn't theological (e.g. cow politics). I don't think Hinduism is even an Indian construction, for the traditional thinking it would just be all separated out into "dharma, temples, festivals" etc without merging it into a single concept. The idea of Hinduism was actually a Middle Eastern invention to describe the foriegn culture of India. Hindia was the Muslim name for India and Hinduism was its culture. I think that most of western society unfairly discriminates against Hindus and Hinduism and then creates more racism by providing affirmative action for the Muslim community.
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londonmyst
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#19
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#19
When you say both sides are you referring to churches you've visited or different sects of Christianity?

(Original post by TimGB)
Christian to Deist to Agnostic Atheist. Eventually realised that, while the idea of God is reasonable, the Christian faith just doesn't hold up with what we know today. Became a deist before deciding that a god is too specific, it feels as if there’s something supernatural that we don’t know much about yet, but the idea of a god just doesn’t really fit the universe we see, at least an all powerful one. I may end up taking the same path dartagnankillian took, I’m not quite sure at the moment though. The only thing I’m sure about is that I’m done with Christianity, I’ve heard enough from both sides to know that it is mostly rubbish.
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username1732491
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#20
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(Original post by londonmyst)
When you say both sides are you referring to churches you've visited or different sects of Christianity?
Both sides, as in Christian and non-Christian. Of course different christians have differing views, but despite hearing a good many Christians of various stances defend their faith, I remain entirely unconvinced that there is any truth to it all. That said, I can understand why people might want to believe in a religion, as it can be comforting, and especially Christianity since it’s easier to believe in large numbers, and most religious people in this country are Christian. I am just convinced that there is no genuine truth to it.
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