whats the best way to revise sufficiently?

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HelpNovas
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how can i revise properly without overloading my brain with things i learnt in an hour then next day not being able to remember as much
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Rabbit2
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The technique i used to get through graduate school [which should work all the way down to 3rd or 4th grade], is to keep track of how long the instructor spends on each topic in class. Typically, each topic will be mentioned 5 or 6 times before the next test. I assign a short 'quickie' name to each topic, and put that at the top of my notes on that section [you DO take notes don't you????]. I also note the time that the instructor started the section (covering that topic). I leave lots of blank space so i can fill in the details later (i used to tape record my lectures - because i couldn't keep up writing it all down). I rate the instructor on the amount of 'work' they are doing. Just talking about something i awarded a 1 to a 3 to. Drawing on the board was a 4 to a 6, A prepared handout was a 7 to a 9. Viewgraphs (with an overhead projector & etc) was a 10 to a 13. All of these varied with level of complexity. The intent of course, is to figure out what the instructor thinks is important - because that is what they are going to put on the exam. Multiply the time spent by the 'work factor number above. As an example, if the instructor talks about something for 4 minutes, then draws on the board for 5 minutes, and both are 'medium complexity', i would multiply 4 x 2 = 8, and 5 x 5 = 25. Adding the two together gives 33. Then the instructor goes on to something else. For that section, the total score is 25. When reviewing for the exam, add up all sections that refer to that topic to get the total score. Then list all the topics in decreasing total score. In my case, the exams took an hour. The average student could do 5 or 6 problems in that time. I would take the top 8 or 9 total scores, make up problems that included everything on each topic that we had covered in class. I would then learn absolutely everything i could about those problems. The first time i did this - i hit the guy 100%. I had EVERY problem that was on the final exam!! I finished the exam (including checking it 3 times for careless errors) in 18 minutes. I did this for each remaining exam in my masters program. The worst i ever did was 70%. I had several other 100% ones. Try that - it worked for me! Best of luck!!
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username3955940
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The pomodoro method is really good for learning in chunks. So you revise for 25 minutes, take a break for 5 and then back to revising for 25 minutes and so on. You do this 25 minute study and then 5 minutes break cycle for about 2 hours (so 4 of these sessions) and then take a longer break for like 20 minutes or something. It’s a good method to stop information getting overloaded and you’re allowing yourself plenty of rest
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HelpNovas
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(Original post by Estarossa)
The pomodoro method is really good for learning in chunks. So you revise for 25 minutes, take a break for 5 and then back to revising for 25 minutes and so on. You do this 25 minute study and then 5 minutes break cycle for about 2 hours (so 4 of these sessions) and then take a longer break for like 20 minutes or something. It’s a good method to stop information getting overloaded and you’re allowing yourself plenty of rest
sounds great ill try that Thank you and also seven deadly sins is good
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username3955940
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(Original post by HelpNovas)
sounds great ill try that Thank you and also seven deadly sins is good
No problem! And yesss best anime 👌 you up to date with it?
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HelpNovas
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(Original post by Rabbit2)
The technique i used to get through graduate school [which should work all the way down to 3rd or 4th grade], is to keep track of how long the instructor spends on each topic in class. Typically, each topic will be mentioned 5 or 6 times before the next test. I assign a short 'quickie' name to each topic, and put that at the top of my notes on that section [you DO take notes don't you????]. I also note the time that the instructor started the section (covering that topic). I leave lots of blank space so i can fill in the details later (i used to tape record my lectures - because i couldn't keep up writing it all down). I rate the instructor on the amount of 'work' they are doing. Just talking about something i awarded a 1 to a 3 to. Drawing on the board was a 4 to a 6, A prepared handout was a 7 to a 9. Viewgraphs (with an overhead projector & etc) was a 10 to a 13. All of these varied with level of complexity. The intent of course, is to figure out what the instructor thinks is important - because that is what they are going to put on the exam. Multiply the time spent by the 'work factor number above. As an example, if the instructor talks about something for 4 minutes, then draws on the board for 5 minutes, and both are 'medium complexity', i would multiply 4 x 2 = 8, and 5 x 5 = 25. Adding the two together gives 33. Then the instructor goes on to something else. For that section, the total score is 25. When reviewing for the exam, add up all sections that refer to that topic to get the total score. Then list all the topics in decreasing total score. In my case, the exams took an hour. The average student could do 5 or 6 problems in that time. I would take the top 8 or 9 total scores, make up problems that included everything on each topic that we had covered in class. I would then learn absolutely everything i could about those problems. The first time i did this - i hit the guy 100%. I had EVERY problem that was on the final exam!! I finished the exam (including checking it 3 times for careless errors) in 18 minutes. I did this for each remaining exam in my masters program. The worst i ever did was 70%. I had several other 100% ones. Try that - it worked for me! Best of luck!!
Erm what you wrote i understood a bit then got lost its confusing.
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Rabbit2
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(Original post by HelpNovas)
Erm what you wrote i understood a bit then got lost its confusing.
Ok, sorry about that. Lemme try again with a bit more detail: The goal is to figure out what the instructor thinks is important. NOTHING else counts, because the instructor is making out the exam. They will only ask you things that they think it is VITAL for you to know, in order to pass the course. Once you figure out what the instructor thinks is important, learn everything about those topics, and be prepared to answer all reasonable questions on those subjects.

The instructor is limited in how much time they can spend teaching the course. There are only so many days [or hours] for lecture and tests. The instructor must use the available time efficiently. They 'budget' how much time to spend on each topic when they are laying out their lesson plan. This 'budgeting' tells you how much they value each topic.

There are only two things the instructor has to work with: a> the time they spend on a topic, and b> the amount of work they do to prepare for that class time. It is the least amount of work to just talk about something. What is somewhat more work is to draw diagrams on the blackboard. Even more work is to prepare 'handouts' ahead of time for the class. Even more work than that is viewgraphs & an overhead projector. If you multiply the number of minutes spent by the 'work factor' - i.e. the amount of work that the instructor did, you get a measurement of the total importance of that topic to the instructor.

So assign an arbitrary number to each amount of work the instructor does:

Talk - 1 to 3
Draw on board - 4 to 6
Handouts - 5 to 7
Viewgraphs - 6 to 9

These numbers are arbitrary, except those involving more work should be bigger. Then multiply the number of minutes spent by the 'work factor' (those arbitrary numbers above. As an example - say the instructor spends 5 minutes talking about a topic, then draws on the board for 6 minutes.

Multiply the 5 minutes by a 2 (for a 'medium' complexity talk), then multiply the 6 minutes by 4 (for a very simple drawing on the board). Add the results - 34 is the result. Enter the "34" into the list of every time that topic was mentioned in class. Say the instructor mentioned the topic 6 times during the grading period [you determine this by looking at your class notes, where you enter the topic being discussed, the amount of time spent, and the amount of work done].

Say that the numbers arrived at using the above approach are 20, 34, 50, 34, 20, 43. The total sum is 201. This evaluates the importance of that topic to the instructor. Do this for all topics covered in the class. Then, list all the topics in descending order. Say that you end up with 20 topics. The 'importance' of each of these topics might be (for example): 450, 400, 352, 300, 201 (from our example above), 180, 120, 98, 84, .....

If we assume that you have an hour for the exam, and that for the class in question, you have to solve arithmetic problems. These problems take about 10 to 15 minutes to do, assuming you know what you're doing. This means you can only do 4 to 6 problems in an hour exam. For a safety factor, assume 8 problems. Take the top 8 'importance' numbers above: 450, 400, ....98. You should then make up sample problems on each of those topics, which incorporate all of the questions and calculations that you encountered in homework or example problems that were discussed in class. Make sure that you can solve ALL of the problems and answer all of the questions you could be asked on these 8 topics.

When you have done that, you should be in a pretty good position to pass the exam, having reviewed all of the topics that your instructor thinks is important.

Best of luck!!
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Rabbit2
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(Original post by Rabbit2)
Ok, sorry about that. Lemme try again with a bit more detail: The goal is to figure out what the instructor thinks is important. NOTHING else counts, because the instructor is making out the exam. They will only ask you things that they think it is VITAL for you to know, in order to pass the course. Once you figure out what the instructor thinks is important, learn everything about those topics, and be prepared to answer all reasonable questions on those subjects.

The instructor is limited in how much time they can spend teaching the course. There are only so many days [or hours] for lecture and tests. The instructor must use the available time efficiently. They 'budget' how much time to spend on each topic when they are laying out their lesson plan. This 'budgeting' tells you how much they value each topic.

There are only two things the instructor has to work with: a> the time they spend on a topic, and b> the amount of work they do to prepare for that class time. It is the least amount of work to just talk about something. What is somewhat more work is to draw diagrams on the blackboard. Even more work is to prepare 'handouts' ahead of time for the class. Even more work than that is viewgraphs & an overhead projector. If you multiply the number of minutes spent by the 'work factor' - i.e. the amount of work that the instructor did, you get a measurement of the total importance of that topic to the instructor.

So assign an arbitrary number to each amount of work the instructor does:

Talk - 1 to 3
Draw on board - 4 to 6
Handouts - 5 to 7
Viewgraphs - 6 to 9

These numbers are arbitrary, except those involving more work should be bigger. Then multiply the number of minutes spent by the 'work factor' (those arbitrary numbers above. As an example - say the instructor spends 5 minutes talking about a topic, then draws on the board for 6 minutes.

Multiply the 5 minutes by a 2 (for a 'medium' complexity talk), then multiply the 6 minutes by 4 (for a very simple drawing on the board). Add the results - 34 is the result. Enter the "34" into the list of every time that topic was mentioned in class. Say the instructor mentioned the topic 6 times during the grading period [you determine this by looking at your class notes, where you enter the topic being discussed, the amount of time spent, and the amount of work done].

Say that the numbers arrived at using the above approach are 20, 34, 50, 34, 20, 43. The total sum is 201. This evaluates the importance of that topic to the instructor. Do this for all topics covered in the class. Then, list all the topics in descending order. Say that you end up with 20 topics. The 'importance' of each of these topics might be (for example): 450, 400, 352, 300, 201 (from our example above), 180, 120, 98, 84, .....

If we assume that you have an hour for the exam, and that for the class in question, you have to solve arithmetic problems. These problems take about 10 to 15 minutes to do, assuming you know what you're doing. This means you can only do 4 to 6 problems in an hour exam. For a safety factor, assume 8 problems. Take the top 8 'importance' numbers above: 450, 400, ....98. You should then make up sample problems on each of those topics, which incorporate all of the questions and calculations that you encountered in homework or example problems that were discussed in class. Make sure that you can solve ALL of the problems and answer all of the questions you could be asked on these 8 topics.

When you have done that, you should be in a pretty good position to pass the exam, having reviewed all of the topics that your instructor thinks is important.

Best of luck!!
HelpNovas> Does that help??? If not, what don't you understand???? Cheers.
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