teenagemess
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#1
I am currently in year 12 and hoping to do an animation course (leaning towards 3D)
Just wondering if anyone can give me any advice as to what kind of independent art work i should be doing for an animation portfolio?
I know most unis say that they're not expecting applicants to have any experience in animation, but is there still something I could be doing to show my passion for animation?
I have a small sketch book that I'm filling up with little sketches and life drawings just to build up my skills, and I am doing a few pieces outside of my a level whenever i get a chance (although art a level takes up A LOT of my free time) but are there certain skills that they look for in particular??
any advice would be reallyyyy helpful
0
reply
Pop_rabbit42
Badges: 3
#2
Report 3 years ago
#2
Im starting a computer arts course this year and I can say from experience that your portfolio will heavily depend on where you apply and whether its a digital or physical portfolio. Life drawings are essential everywhere, and if you can join a life drawing class or group even better.

If you're applying to a heavily 'arts' based course then your drawing skill may be the main thing you'll be scored on. For a technology based course (and from your interest in 3D Im guessing this is where you're aiming ) being able to show off some short or technical clips you've made are ace - a simple stop-motion or flash. Look at the kind of software/units the course offers and decide whats accessible to work on.

In either case non-animation related content is equally valuable (as long as it shows your creativity and *creative process). My successful portfolio included a contemporary arts headpiece for example.

*CREATIVE PROCESS - not sure how much this will have been emphasized to you but for laying out your portfolio, the development of the piece is just as, if not more important than the outcome. Markers will want to see your critical thinking throughout a project even if its just development pics or screenshots. (see attached)

The last thing to think about is more a pit fall for digi portfolios and may seem obvious, but I swear the number of people it catches out is ridiculous- if the guidelines say you have eg 15 file submissions, DO NOT SUBMIT 15 PICTURES. Just like for a physical portfolio treat each file as compilation of the subject. Life drawing file? You could get 4-5 good quality pics on one page. Got an animation/physical project? Depending on how many projects you're working with, give 2-3 files per project encompassing research, ideas, development, what you learned and then the final outcome.

I hope thats useful in some way, sorry it turned into a 'general portfolio how-to' towards the end ^_^' Best of luck in your applications!

TEST
Attached files
1
reply
Ravensbourne
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#3
Report 3 years ago
#3
(Original post by teenagemess)
I am currently in year 12 and hoping to do an animation course (leaning towards 3D)
Just wondering if anyone can give me any advice as to what kind of independent art work i should be doing for an animation portfolio?
I know most unis say that they're not expecting applicants to have any experience in animation, but is there still something I could be doing to show my passion for animation?
I have a small sketch book that I'm filling up with little sketches and life drawings just to build up my skills, and I am doing a few pieces outside of my a level whenever i get a chance (although art a level takes up A LOT of my free time) but are there certain skills that they look for in particular??
any advice would be reallyyyy helpful
Hey teenagemess

Its good to know that you want to be fully prepared to start a degree. I'd say keep up with the sketches that you're doing. If you have time and want to develop more I'd suggest trying to use and get to know some software like the Adobe package and mainly Maya. Maya is free for students. See if your College or Sixth Form can provide Adobe for you. When you open the software It does look intimidating (at least for me) so look on youtube for some tutorials to get to know the basics. You can try to explore 2D and maybe 3D animation. It can be really simple and tutors aren't looking for you to have a fully developed animation, It can be a work in progress.

I hope this helps and if you have any other questions feel free to ask. Good Luck in your A levels
- Aliya
0
reply
moid
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#4
Report 3 years ago
#4
(Original post by teenagemess)
I am currently in year 12 and hoping to do an animation course (leaning towards 3D)
Just wondering if anyone can give me any advice as to what kind of independent art work i should be doing for an animation portfolio?
I know most unis say that they're not expecting applicants to have any experience in animation, but is there still something I could be doing to show my passion for animation?
I have a small sketch book that I'm filling up with little sketches and life drawings just to build up my skills, and I am doing a few pieces outside of my a level whenever i get a chance (although art a level takes up A LOT of my free time) but are there certain skills that they look for in particular??
any advice would be reallyyyy helpful
You might find that different courses will have different portfolio requirements, so it would be a good idea to check with the courses you are interested in to see if they have specific work examples they want to see - you'll have a better chance of getting a place at interview that way. For the 3D side of things, yes definitely try a 3D program first - don't pay 9 grand to study on a course in 3D to find out that you hate the software! Learn that before you put any money down. It will take a good month of fighting maya before any of it begins to feel natural, and even then Maya will still do its best to destroy your work for you (it's not you, Maya hates all humans).

If you show actual animation that will dramatically increase your chances of getting a place. With Maya, once you've understood the interface a bit you could go to sites like creativecrash and download a rig (the digital skeleton that goes inside each character) and start to animate that - if you get the Richard Williams book - The Animator's Survival Kit - and use the drawings as guides for your keyframes you could animate a rig and show off your understanding of movement (obviously credit the rig creator in any showreel you put together).

A sketchbook is a great idea for filling with characters, drawings of places you are at, people you meet - these are often more interesting than the work we see from A-level Art which can be pretty tedious a lot of the time (create a surrealist painting in the style of Dali, create an impressionist painting in the style of Monet yawn...) where the art teacher has told you what to do - we're more interested in seeing how imaginative you are. Life drawing is a vital skill to show, and perspective drawing is a good idea as well.

Good luck and make sure you draw / create something everyday!
0
reply
teenagemess
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#5
(Original post by Ravensbourne)
Hey teenagemess

Its good to know that you want to be fully prepared to start a degree. I'd say keep up with the sketches that you're doing. If you have time and want to develop more I'd suggest trying to use and get to know some software like the Adobe package and mainly Maya. Maya is free for students. See if your College or Sixth Form can provide Adobe for you. When you open the software It does look intimidating (at least for me) so look on youtube for some tutorials to get to know the basics. You can try to explore 2D and maybe 3D animation. It can be really simple and tutors aren't looking for you to have a fully developed animation, It can be a work in progress.

I hope this helps and if you have any other questions feel free to ask. Good Luck in your A levels
- Aliya
wow i didn't realise maya was free for students so i will definitely get some experience on that and adobe
thanks for the reply!
1
reply
teenagemess
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#6
(Original post by moid)
You might find that different courses will have different portfolio requirements, so it would be a good idea to check with the courses yo uare interested in to see if they have specific work examples they want to see - you'll have a better chance of getting a place at interview that way. For the 3D side of things, yes definitely try a 3D program first - don't bay 9 grand to study on a course in 3D to find out that you hate the software! Learn that before you put any money down. It will take a good month of fighting maya before any of it begins to feel natural, and even then Maya will still do it's best to destroy your work for you (it's not you, Maya hates all humans).

If you show actual animation that will dramatically increase your chances of getting a place. With Maya, once you've understood the interface a bit you could go to sites like creativecrash and download a rig (the digital skeleton that goes inside each character) and start to animate that - if you get the Richard Williams book - The Animator's Survival Kit - and use the drawings as guides for your keyframes you could animate a rig and show off your understanding of movement (obviously credit the rig creator in any showreel you put together).

A sketchbook is a great idea for filling with characters, drawings of places you are at, people you meet - these are oftne more interesting than the work we see from A-level Art which can be pretty tedious a lot of the time (create a surrealist painting in the style of Dali, create an impressionist painting in the style of Monet yawn...) where the art teacher has told you what to do - we're more interested in seeing how imaginative you are. Life drawing is a vital skill to show, and perspective drawing is a good idea as well.

Good luck and make sure you draw / create something everyday!
Thanks! i'll check out that book and get started on maya (and i know what you mean about a-level work, it can be very constricted)
0
reply
geekofmovement
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#7
Report 3 weeks ago
#7
Hi. I'm in the same position as you. although I'm planning on focusing on more of the 2D side of things. I'm curious as to your experience of university so far. and any tips you could give me since I am currently in year 12 moving into year 13 and have alot of these same questions NotsureifIwillevengetareplybutohwell
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

What's worrying you most about starting back at school/college this year?

The potential for Covid to keep disrupting things (109)
14.53%
My mental health (110)
14.67%
Feeling behind academically (142)
18.93%
Making friends/social anxiety (135)
18%
How to organise myself (25)
3.33%
How to revise/study effectively (89)
11.87%
Future career, uni, pathway planning and applications (125)
16.67%
Something else - let us know in the thread (15)
2%

Watched Threads

View All