magmiles
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
I'm in Year 11 and I'm taking A-Level Computer Science in September and I want to know from anybody that's taking it now or has taken it if it's really challenging or not. If so, what are the challenging topics in Computer Science?

+ what resources can I use to start learning Computer Science now (AQA)
0
reply
magmiles
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#2
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#2
bump
0
reply
username3434964
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 years ago
#3
Bump
0
reply
Archon9
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
Bump
0
reply
Dysf(x)al
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
(Original post by magmiles)
I'm in Year 11 and I'm taking A-Level Computer Science in September and I want to know from anybody that's taking it now or has taken it if it's really challenging or not. If so, what are the challenging topics in Computer Science?

+ what resources can I use to start learning Computer Science now (AQA)
I wouldn't say it's hugely challenging. Getting an A* can be tough because the theory papers have quite a lot of content on them, but the dropout rate in my class is far lower than for physics and chemistry. I'm also doing AQA in case you're wondering.

As for resources, if you did GCSE you'll have a headstart (don't worry if you didn't - I didn't do it and I was fine) as far as theory goes. If you're looking at getting better at coding, you'll be taught the language from scratch so it's not necessary to learn the language your school/college uses. Familiarising yourself with code structures (e.g. branches, loops, functions, recursion) is more important imo.
1
reply
magmiles
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#6
(Original post by TheMindGarage)
I wouldn't say it's hugely challenging. Getting an A* can be tough because the theory papers have quite a lot of content on them, but the dropout rate in my class is far lower than for physics and chemistry. I'm also doing AQA in case you're wondering.

As for resources, if you did GCSE you'll have a headstart (don't worry if you didn't - I didn't do it and I was fine) as far as theory goes. If you're looking at getting better at coding, you'll be taught the language from scratch so it's not necessary to learn the language your school/college uses. Familiarising yourself with code structures (e.g. branches, loops, functions, recursion) is more important imo.
Thanks for the info, my school is doing AQA too. I have already taught myself some C++ but I have no idea what language they'll teach me during the course, do you have any idea? I didn't take the subject at GCSE but honestly I'm aiming to get an A*, but looking at previous years, only 3% of people who take the subject get an A* so I'm really looking to get an edge on the subject where ever possible. Anything else do you suggest I do & any websites to add on?
0
reply
magmiles
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#7
Is the language really likely to be python as it seems really basic in comparison to C++ (teaching myself)

I've never come across Networking or Hardware, OS & General Architecture, where can I get a better knowledge of them?
0
reply
Dysf(x)al
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#8
Report 2 years ago
#8
(Original post by magmiles)
Thanks for the info, my school is doing AQA too. I have already taught myself some C++ but I have no idea what language they'll teach me during the course, do you have any idea? I didn't take the subject at GCSE but honestly I'm aiming to get an A*, but looking at previous years, only 3% of people who take the subject get an A* so I'm really looking to get an edge on the subject where ever possible. Anything else do you suggest I do & any websites to add on?
Depends on the college. Mine does VB *proceeds to vomit on keyboard*, but I learned C# for my project (it's a Unity game) and I'm in the process of relearning Python for competitive programming purposes.

I don't really know of many resources for theory - my college makes their own and everyone just uses those. If you're a strong coder, you can try things like coding common algorithms (e.g. merge sort, quick sort) or look at programming competitions like the British Informatics Olympiad (very difficult), Google Code Jam (insanely difficult) or TCSOCC (not that difficult but in the real thing you only have 1 hour for the entire lot).
0
reply
fl0wvo
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#9
Report 2 years ago
#9
Depends on your attitude towards computing. You really need to put in a lot of time learning theory, practising your programming language and also reading extra stuff. I've just finished my year 12 finals and I can safely say that in the unit 1 paper for AQA, a lot of the questions require expanded knowledge of terms which are only briefly mentioned in the textbook!
0
reply
magmiles
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#10
Really helpful, thanks
1
reply
winterscoming
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#11
Report 2 years ago
#11
(Original post by magmiles)
Is the language really likely to be python as it seems really basic in comparison to C++ (teaching myself)

I've never come across Networking or Hardware, OS & General Architecture, where can I get a better knowledge of them?
As mentioned, there's nothing wrong with Python at all, but the best thing to do is choose a language and stick to it.

C++ doesn't have as many good quality resources compared with Java and Python, but you could try these:

Free Microsoft C++ Courses (ignore paid-for certificates, click the 'Audit' link when enrolling):

For learning networking, try Cisco courses - no other courses really come close in terms of quality:

(Again, Its free - when clicking to enrol, choose the link which says "audit" and don't click the ones which ask you to pay)

Check out this game as a fun way of learning to quickly think in binary:

Also try some of the codecademy interactive lessons to get a bit of practice in HTML, CSS, JavaScript and SQL - https://www.codecademy.com/catalog/subject/all
2
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

What factors affect your mental health the most right now?

Anxiousness about lockdown easing (168)
4.9%
Uncertainty around my education (503)
14.66%
Uncertainty around my future career prospects (382)
11.13%
Lack of purpose or motivation (479)
13.96%
Lack of support system (eg. teachers, counsellors, delays in care) (167)
4.87%
Impact of lockdown on physical health (211)
6.15%
Loneliness (292)
8.51%
Financial worries (123)
3.58%
Concern about myself or my loves ones getting/having been ill (137)
3.99%
Exposure to negative news/social media (155)
4.52%
Lack of real life entertainment (190)
5.54%
Lack of confidence in making big life decisions (305)
8.89%
Worry about missed opportunities during the pandemic (319)
9.3%

Watched Threads

View All