elliemayor
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I'm currently looking at Oxford, Birmingham, Nottingham and Newcastle, however would like a backup in case I don't get an A* in my predicted grades. Anyone suggest any others that are traditional learning or more traditional integrated with not a lot of PBL? Also anyone know what Queen's in Belfast is like, or ever heard about studying Medicine in Germany?
Thanks!
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nexttime
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(Original post by elliemayor)
I'm currently looking at Oxford, Birmingham, Nottingham and Newcastle, however would like a backup in case I don't get an A* in my predicted grades. Anyone suggest any others that are traditional learning or more traditional integrated with not a lot of PBL?
Have you looked up entry requirements and are using your strengths well? An important factor to consider.

...or ever heard about studying Medicine in Germany?
Do you speak German?

If medicine in Germany is an option for you i would give it strong strong consideration. My knowledge is a little limited, but my understanding is: far lower university fees, med school about the same length, far far better and shorter post-graduate training, better healthcare in general. Coming back to the UK after that and you'll be 4-6 years ahead of your peers, living it up as a consultant as they slave away as registrars for years and years :p:
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Dyscopia
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(Original post by elliemayor)
I'm currently looking at Oxford, Birmingham, Nottingham and Newcastle, however would like a backup in case I don't get an A* in my predicted grades. Anyone suggest any others that are traditional learning or more traditional integrated with not a lot of PBL? Also anyone know what Queen's in Belfast is like, or ever heard about studying Medicine in Germany?
Thanks!
They're all good schools, but you have to research about the type of teaching they do, and what they offer/cannot offer. Oxford is still using cadavers for the teaching of anatomy, whilst e.g. Birmingham doesn't. If it's something you would like to have as part of your medical studies, you might want to reconsider.

I have a rather good understanding of the medical admissions in Germany (been living here for over half my life now). So: you have to be able to speak German at a B2-C1 level for a medical degree. There's no English medical schools here that I am aware of. Without long-term residency here or being a native German, there's no way around it.

Additionally, you need to have your A-levels approved by the "Zeugnisanerkennungsstelle" which basically converts A-level grades into the German equivalent, Abitur, which is how you'd be able to apply to German universities. This is how it works for the Cambridge A-levels, but same principles apply. http://www.cambridgeinternational.or...-in-german.pdf
To be eligible, you need to have three of Bio, Chem, Maths, and Physics at A-level. Without it you won't have a chance, sadly.

There's also the "Medizinertest" people here take to improve their average for an application. It's sort of like a mix of BMAT and UKCAT, but much longer (and, arguably, harder). However, the deadline for it this year has already passed so you would either try schools which don't require said test or apply next year. You can apply for med school starting July 5th here, but you need your A-levels translated earlier (before you apply). You can apply to as many med schools as you wish though, so that's something different to the UK requirements. And there's no interviews - you are accepted based on your grades, exam performance, etc. It's also often the case of first-come-first-serve, as medical places are very sought after in Germany. Everyone has literally perfect to almost perfect scores in the Abitur (1.0 is the highest score, but you get technically get up to 0.75 superscored with the Medizinertest and if you achieve the highest marks in your leaving high school transcript). Basically, Medizinertest allows you to go from A*AA to A*A*A*, if that makes sense (VERY rough analogy).

In terms of the things nexttime mentioned, it's pretty accurate. For me, uni would be free, and I'd only have to pay for accommodation if I were to decide to study here. However, I am unsure of the fees for international students, and how things would change with England leaving the EU.
Med school is 6 years here, regardless of where you study. There's no intercalated degree that you do, it's just medicine through and through. At the end you are a "Medical Doctor" rather than someone with something like an MBBS. Shouldn't make much difference if you were to go back to the UK to practice, but something perhaps to keep in mind.
The advancements here are quite good, and the university hospitals have some really awesome facilities - I got to see them during my work experience. According to the senior doctor of the department I was doing my work experience at, the medical degree is more intense in the UK. He said he did an exchange semester for his preclinicals at Oxford and doing rest of his degree in Hamburg, and said it was much more intense than what the teaching in Germany was like. Obviously it definitely changed over time, but I'd still agree with the fact that UK makes the degree a bit more "compact" as usually 5 years are spent doing medicine, whereas the 6th year is for the intercalation.

And the healthcare is amazing as well, but it has its own downsides as well. Having a few family members in healthcare in Germany, the attitude to the profession has changed a bit, and there's more of a pressure from the public on the practitioners. But nothing horrible.

It also boils down to the way you prefer to learn - would learning in German be something you'd like to do? Would the different culture be of issue (Germans have their own ways and, in my opinion, are much more stubborn and pedantic than Englishmen )



Tl;dr Medicine in Germany is also competitive, and you need to be fluent to be able to study at the public institutions. There's pros and cons to it, and it's up to the individual to decide.
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Lionheartat20
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Look into Kassel University for Medicine in Germany.
They do their first 2 years at Southampton University and then the remainder of their studies in Kassel. They are definitely awarded a UK Southampton Degree yet get to experience training in 2 countries.
Obviously it's more challenging in terms of two languages - and I think there are high fees - but it's certainly a unique opportunity.

P.S. I have no idea about the entry requirements for it though.
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