Specific heat capacity question Watch

Freedom physics
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#1
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I'm asking in the context of determining the specific heat capacity of a substance in which you put the solid that you want to find the specific heat capacity of into a container that makes you able to heat the solid via. A heater. the solid is in a sealed and insulating container with a thermometer also being able to record the temperature of the solid. The circuit containing the heater contains a power supply, a variable resistor,a voltmeter connected in parallel to the heater and an ammeter connected in series.

My first question is why is the energy transferred from the heater to the solid calculated with E = IVt, where I is current, V is the potential difference across the heater and t is the time taken to increase the temperature of the solid.

I think I don't understand because I don't really understand circuits that much 😄, well I can't answer really any circuit questions in AS physics well that is.

Here's the context to my second question:

The setup to determine the specific heat capacity of a liquid is exactly the same except you also have a stirrer, a lid for the top of the open container and a calorimeter.

Do you use the calorimeter because there's a change in the colour of the liquid when it's temperature is raised? 🙂 Ie the liquid's thermochromic I think the word is 😄
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Joinedup
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(Original post by Freedom physics)
I'm asking in the context of determining the specific heat capacity of a substance in which you put the solid that you want to find the specific heat capacity of into a container that makes you able to heat the solid via. A heater. the solid is in a sealed and insulating container with a thermometer also being able to record the temperature of the solid. The circuit containing the heater contains a power supply, a variable resistor,a voltmeter connected in parallel to the heater and an ammeter connected in series.

My first question is why is the energy transferred from the heater to the solid calculated with E = IVt, where I is current, V is the potential difference across the heater and t is the time taken to increase the temperature of the solid.

I think I don't understand because I don't really understand circuits that much 😄, well I can't answer really any circuit questions in AS physics well that is.

Here's the context to my second question:

The setup to determine the specific heat capacity of a liquid is exactly the same except you also have a stirrer, a lid for the top of the open container and a calorimeter.

Do you use the calorimeter because there's a change in the colour of the liquid when it's temperature is raised? 🙂 Ie the liquid's thermochromic I think the word is 😄
IV is power
t is time

energy is power multiplied by time, 1 Joule is 1 Watt second

household example: you're billed by the electric company for the amount of energy used... the units of energy measured on the electric meter (and printed on the bill) are kWh... kW is power (1kW = 1000W) h is time in hours (1h=3600 seconds)

a calorimeter is a device used for measuring heat capacity, its named after an ancient unit of energy... the calorie - you're probably confusing it with colourimeter, a device for measuring colour.
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Eimmanuel
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(Original post by Freedom physics)
I'm asking in the context of determining the specific heat capacity of a substance in which you put the solid that you want to find the specific heat capacity of into a container that makes you able to heat the solid via. A heater. the solid is in a sealed and insulating container with a thermometer also being able to record the temperature of the solid. The circuit containing the heater contains a power supply, a variable resistor,a voltmeter connected in parallel to the heater and an ammeter connected in series.

My first question is why is the energy transferred from the heater to the solid calculated with E = IVt, where I is current, V is the potential difference across the heater and t is the time taken to increase the temperature of the solid.

I think I don't understand because I don't really understand circuits that much 😄, well I can't answer really any circuit questions in AS physics well that is.

...
You may want to revise electrical power using the following link.
https://www.s-cool.co.uk/a-level/phy...work-and-power
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Freedom physics
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(Original post by Joinedup)
IV is power
t is time

energy is power multiplied by time, 1 Joule is 1 Watt second

household example: you're billed by the electric company for the amount of energy used... the units of energy measured on the electric meter (and printed on the bill) are kWh... kW is power (1kW = 1000W) h is time in hours (1h=3600 seconds)

a calorimeter is a device used for measuring heat capacity, its named after an ancient unit of energy... the calorie - you're probably confusing it with colourimeter, a device for measuring colour.
Yep! Thanks! That's just explained everything! I was also getting confused with a colorimeter! 😄
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