Kizza12345
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I’m taking an extended diploma in engineering and they recommend taking either A level maths or A level physics , how hard is A level physics
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kibi.coco
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I can be a bit tricky but it's pretty much all relative. I found it okay and enjoyable but I'm also did maths and further maths which helped a lot.

It's definitely manageable but just make sure you have the support avaliable. There's required practicals so you'd need to learn in an institution (unless you're Welch in which case I have no idea) I'd imagine the engineering would help.
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kibi.coco
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It's possible but also difficult to do physics without maths.
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artful_lounger
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It depends what you plan to do afterwards; I would say Maths is a more ubiquitous requirement for degrees in Engineering, either by itself (well, with the relevant additional A-levels to make three, for that route), with Physics, or with the BTEC Engineering course (or all three together). It is also not a spurious requirement; engineering is necessarily mathematical for a degree course.

You will cover the A-level Maths content, more or less all of it, eventually in that route; from the Physics side, the core topics that are most relevant are the EM and mechanics ones (the latter being covered in A-level Maths anyway) and a lot of the rest isn't as directly used in such a course. There are several engineering courses requiring Maths and not Physics; I imagine far fewer requiring the reverse.

While A-level Physics does't use much, if any of the A-level Maths material, it does use maths from GCSE a lot, and you need to continually be doing maths and using the material, beyond what you'll use minimally in the physics lessons alone, to keep on top of it and be confident enough with your abilities for the exam. Students taking Maths and Physics end up getting the reinforcement of their maths abilities by constantly using them in their Maths lessons as well - while they're learning new material, they're using old material to do so. Essentially, without taking A-level Maths, you need to set aside more time to practice doing maths while taking A-level Physics.

If you're looking at apprenticeships (up to and including some degree apprenticeships) in engineering, then Maths is less essential but still useful I would suggest.
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Kizza12345
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(Original post by kibi.coco)
I can be a bit tricky but it's pretty much all relative. I found it okay and enjoyable but I'm also did maths and further maths which helped a lot.

It's definitely manageable but just make sure you have the support avaliable. There's required practicals so you'd need to learn in an institution (unless you're Welch in which case I have no idea) I'd imagine the engineering would help.
so would you recommend doing maths physics and engineering??
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kibi.coco
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(Original post by Kizza12345)
so would you recommend doing maths physics and engineering??
Wouldn't recommend physics without maths. I know people who did and stuggled. You could at least do an AS in it? I think an AS would cover the important stuff but i'm not 100% sure as you'd be on the new spec
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kibi.coco
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
It depends what you plan to do afterwards; I would say Maths is a more ubiquitous requirement for degrees in Engineering, either by itself (well, with the relevant additional A-levels to make three, for that route), with Physics, or with the BTEC Engineering course (or all three together). It is also not a spurious requirement; engineering is necessarily mathematical for a degree course.

You will cover the A-level Maths content, more or less all of it, eventually in that route; from the Physics side, the core topics that are most relevant are the EM and mechanics ones (the latter being covered in A-level Maths anyway) and a lot of the rest isn't as directly used in such a course. There are several engineering courses requiring Maths and not Physics; I imagine far fewer requiring the reverse.

While A-level Physics does't use much, if any of the A-level Maths material, it does use maths from GCSE a lot, and you need to continually be doing maths and using the material, beyond what you'll use minimally in the physics lessons alone, to keep on top of it and be confident enough with your abilities for the exam. Students taking Maths and Physics end up getting the reinforcement of their maths abilities by constantly using them in their Maths lessons as well - while they're learning new material, they're using old material to do so. Essentially, without taking A-level Maths, you need to set aside more time to practice doing maths while taking A-level Physics.

If you're looking at apprenticeships (up to and including some degree apprenticeships) in engineering, then Maths is less essential but still useful I would suggest.
I definitely agree with maths being a requirement. I think it a lot of it could depend on where you want to go
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Kizza12345
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
It depends what you plan to do afterwards; I would say Maths is a more ubiquitous requirement for degrees in Engineering, either by itself (well, with the relevant additional A-levels to make three, for that route), with Physics, or with the BTEC Engineering course (or all three together). It is also not a spurious requirement; engineering is necessarily mathematical for a degree course.

You will cover the A-level Maths content, more or less all of it, eventually in that route; from the Physics side, the core topics that are most relevant are the EM and mechanics ones (the latter being covered in A-level Maths anyway) and a lot of the rest isn't as directly used in such a course. There are several engineering courses requiring Maths and not Physics; I imagine far fewer requiring the reverse.

While A-level Physics does't use much, if any of the A-level Maths material, it does use maths from GCSE a lot, and you need to continually be doing maths and using the material, beyond what you'll use minimally in the physics lessons alone, to keep on top of it and be confident enough with your abilities for the exam. Students taking Maths and Physics end up getting the reinforcement of their maths abilities by constantly using them in their Maths lessons as well - while they're learning new material, they're using old material to do so. Essentially, without taking A-level Maths, you need to set aside more time to practice doing maths while taking A-level Physics.

If you're looking at apprenticeships (up to and including some degree apprenticeships) in engineering, then Maths is less essential but still useful I would suggest.
Thankyou this helped a lot!! I think I’m going to do physics along side my engineering course as I find it more enjoyable , however I’ll make sure to practice maths consistently on top
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kibi.coco
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Just remembered actually it might be worth looking towards getting a Level 3 qualification in core maths if you don't want to do A level. I know they ran classes at my sixth form but I don't know much else about it.
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Kizza12345
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(Original post by kibi.coco)
I definitely agree with maths being a requirement. I think it a lot of it could depend on where you want to go
I’m looking to go onto an advanced apprenticeship after college , studying aerospace engineering, do you think physics and engineering will be manageable as I’m predicted a 6 in maths and have I have a relatively good work ethic
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Kizza12345
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(Original post by kibi.coco)
Just remembered actually it might be worth looking towards getting a Level 3 qualification in core maths if you don't want to do A level. I know they ran classes at my sixth form but I don't know much else about it.
How much time does this take up? As I’m at college 4 days a week for my engineering course and I’m going to have to complete assignments etc, and I want my subjects to be manageable
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kibi.coco
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(Original post by Kizza12345)
I’m looking to go onto an advanced apprenticeship after college , studying aerospace engineering, do you think physics and engineering will be manageable as I’m predicted a 6 in maths and have I have a relatively good work ethic
Hard to say. I know someone who got an A and struggled with physics without maths. He had a good work ethic too. Can't say what grade he got as we're still waiting for results. It's mainly for stuff like rearranging using logs and expodentials, helps with understanding graphs, gradients and areas in terms of differentiation and intergration (not a requirement but definitely gained me some marks), it helps in derivations espicially. It'll be better in the long run if you can balance it.
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kibi.coco
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(Original post by Kizza12345)
How much time does this take up? As I’m at college 4 days a week for my engineering course and I’m going to have to complete assignments etc, and I want my subjects to be manageable
I have n9 clue. I think the lessons were an hour every one or two weeks.
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Username11458
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(Original post by Kizza12345)
I’m taking an extended diploma in engineering and they recommend taking either A level maths or A level physics , how hard is A level physics
I take A-Level Physics and don’t take A-Level Maths (or any maths). Physics is fine and manageable (I got 6 in Maths at GCSE) so you should be fine - always ask your teacher for extra help with the maths which they are normally happy to help with 👍
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