EU students will pay same fees and get same loans for 2019/20 Watch

Doones
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European students applying to universities in England next year – after Britain’s formal exit from the EU – will be eligible for student loans and tuition fees at the same rate as domestic students, the government has announced.

https://www.theguardian.com/educatio...es-past-brexit

Scotland had already confirmed EU student status.
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999tigger
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
European students applying to universities in England next year – after Britain’s formal exit from the EU – will be eligible for student loans and tuition fees at the same rate as domestic students, the government has announced.

https://www.theguardian.com/educatio...es-past-brexit

Scotland had already confirmed EU student status.
I thought that was the case anyway and will apply to 2020 as well.
It wouldnt surprise me if it stopped after because the EU dont seem interested in any form of co operation or continuance in existing arrangements such as international arrest warrants, Galileo, so they would rather cut their noses off to spite their faces.
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Doones
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(Original post by 999tigger)
I thought that was the case anyway and will apply to 2020 as well.
It wouldnt surprise me if it stopped after because the EU dont seem interested in any form of co operation or continuance in existing arrangements such as international arrest warrants, Galileo, so they would rather cut their noses off to spite their faces.
The previous statement last April covered to 2018/19 only.
https://www.gov.uk/government/news/g...r-2018-to-2019

They delayed confirming 2019/20 transition arrangements until just now. I agree it was always likely it would stay the same during the Transition Period but even 2020/21 is still tbc officially.
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999tigger
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
The previous statement last April covered to 2018/19 only.
https://www.gov.uk/government/news/g...r-2018-to-2019

They delayed confirming 2019/20 transition arrangements until just now. I agree it was always likely it would stay the same during the Transition Period but even 2020/21 is still tbc officially.
Point was we would still be in the EU so it would have been challenged if it was otherwise. For the small cost it would have been unfair and a good stick for the EU to beat us with about how their citizens are treated. They are just looking for excuses at the moment.
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username1524603
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Stupid move! All of this could and should be used as a bargaining tool against the EU. The tea and biscuits, nicey nice, compromise on anything, never upset the Eurocrats approach does not work.
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Doones
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(Original post by Jacob E)
Stupid move! All of this could and should be used as a bargaining tool against the EU. The tea and biscuits, nicey nice, compromise on anything, never upset the Eurocrats approach does not work.
The universities needed to know the fee status for their 2019 entry EU students now. UCAS 2019 opens in a couple of months and universities have to make the necessary plans.
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username1524603
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
The universities needed to know the fee status for their 2019 entry EU students now. UCAS 2019 opens in a couple of months and universities have to make the necessary plans.
The universities could always have charged EU students identical fees to other international students and EU students could have had identical access to finance to other international students. After all, EU students are international students and should not be treated any differently. The bargaining tool could always have been to give retrospective rebates to EU students to correct any overcharging.
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Doones
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(Original post by Jacob E)
The universities could always have charged EU students identical fees to other international students and EU students could have had identical access to finance to other international students. After all, EU students are international students and should not be treated any differently. The bargaining tool could always have been to give retrospective rebates to EU students to correct any overcharging.
Then the number of EU students would have dropped, hence the need to be able to plan for that scenario.
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username1524603
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
Then the number of EU students would have dropped, hence the need to be able to plan for that scenario.
The number of EU students declining is not exactly a bad thing. It increases the number of places available to home students who have a higher chance of making their first choice. In fact, the extra money from charging EU students a lot more would more than make up for the drop in numbers. It's why universities love international students - they are a cash cow.
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Doones
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(Original post by Jacob E)
The number of EU students declining is not exactly a bad thing. It increases the number of places available to home students who have a higher chance of making their first choice. In fact, the extra money from charging EU students a lot more would more than make up for the drop in numbers. It's why universities love international students - they are a cash cow.
Most home students get their first choice university.

International students have higher dropout rates and can be a significant drain on student services. The grass is not always greener...
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wolto
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
European students applying to universities in England next year – after Britain’s formal exit from the EU – will be eligible for student loans and tuition fees at the same rate as domestic students, the government has announced.

https://www.theguardian.com/educatio...es-past-brexit

Scotland had already confirmed EU student status.
What about this year?
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Doones
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(Original post by wolto)
What about this year?
Same as normal: home rate for fees, tuition fee loan, no maintenance loan.

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wolto
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
Same as normal: home rate for fees, tuition fee loan, no maintenance loan.

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Need maintenance loan 😑
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username1524603
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
Most home students get their first choice university.

International students have higher dropout rates and can be a significant drain on student services. The grass is not always greener...
I cannot find the exact figures in the cycle report, however, it is impossible to know because first choice includes not only students on results day who meet the grades but students who did not receive an offer from their desired university when applying. UCAS has no way of knowing if the universities giving offers to, or rejecting a student is that student's favoured university.

On your second point, you are arguing a bit of a straw man. Why do international students have a higher drop out rate? Being a long way from home; not being used to the different culture; not always being fully confident using the language; not seeing their family as often as home students; and not always having people with the same experiences as them in the same social circle, making it difficult to make close friends. EU students suffer from the same problems. So given the choice between EU students and other international students, I would choose the international students because at least they contribute more. Either way, none of this explains why UK universities should not be desperate to see EU student numbers remain the same.
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Doones
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(Original post by Jacob E)
I cannot find the exact figures in the cycle report, however, it is impossible to know because first choice includes not only students on results day who meet the grades but students who did not receive an offer from their desired university when applying. UCAS has no way of knowing if the universities giving offers to, or rejecting a student is that student's favoured university.

On your second point, you are arguing a bit of a straw man. Why do international students have a higher drop out rate? Being a long way from home; not being used to the different culture; not always being fully confident using the language; not seeing their family as often as home students; and not always having people with the same experiences as them in the same social circle, making it difficult to make close friends. EU students suffer from the same problems. So given the choice between EU students and other international students, I would choose the international students because at least they contribute more. Either way, none of this explains why UK universities should not be desperate to see EU student numbers remain the same.
The main point is universities need time for strategic planning. Delaying this announcement further would seriously impact that planning.

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username1524603
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
The main point is universities need time for strategic planning. Delaying this announcement further would seriously impact that planning.

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And the counter is universities could have easily planned for all EU students be treated like other international students. There might be a few years for adjustment after Brexit because EU students might not end up being treated the same and number could be off, but there is no reason why this announcement was vital.
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wolto
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
European students applying to universities in England next year – after Britain’s formal exit from the EU – will be eligible for student loans and tuition fees at the same rate as domestic students, the government has announced.

https://www.theguardian.com/educatio...es-past-brexit

Scotland had already confirmed EU student status.
I'm currently getting only tuition fee as a home student but from the EU team if you get me? Does this mean next academic year I can apply for maintenance loan and tuition fee from the EU team?
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Doones
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(Original post by wolto)
I'm currently getting only tuition fee as a home student but from the EU team if you get me? Does this mean next academic year I can apply for maintenance loan and tuition fee from the EU team?
Only if your personal fee basis changes to Home. EU students don't get the maintenance loan.
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wolto
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
Only if your personal fee basis changes to Home. EU students don't get the maintenance loan.
My personal tuition fee is Home yeah, thought the article said from next year we can apply for maintenance loan as a domestic student
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Doones
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(Original post by wolto)
My personal tuition fee is Home yeah, thought the article said from next year we can apply for maintenance loan as a domestic student
The availability of the maintenance loan hasn't changed. It's still not available to EU students, only Home.
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