ZdYnm8vuNR
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What's the difference between:

BA, BA (Hons), MEng, MCompsci, Bachelor degree, BSc (Hons), BEng (Hon), MCompu (H), Msci (Hon)

Theres so many differnt types jeez
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hmaelr
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Regarding the different degree award titles, you may find the following link useful: https://www.ed.ac.uk/studying/underg...e/degree-names

As for the difference between an Honours and non Honours degree, you may refer to the following link: https://www.document-centre.co.uk/ba...des-explained/
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ZdYnm8vuNR
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(Original post by hmaelr)
Regarding the different degree award titles, you may find the following link useful: https://www.ed.ac.uk/studying/underg...e/degree-names

As for the difference between an Honours and non Honours degree, you may refer to the following link: https://www.document-centre.co.uk/ba...des-explained/
So whats the difference between a BEng and a BSci if they are both for computer science
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hmaelr
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(Original post by ZdYnm8vuNR)
So whats the difference between a BEng and a BSci if they are both for computer science
Frankly speaking, I’m not entirely sure, but the following is one the FAQs taken from the University of Edinburgh’s School of Informatics which you may find useful:

What is the difference between a BEng and a BSc?

There is no difference in content between a BSc and a BEng and the British Computer Society accredits them both. Employers treat both degrees the same and a BSc or a BEng in Computer Science from University of Edinburgh should carry weight anywhere in the world. The choice of BEng is designed for students who come from countries where computer science is regarded as an engineering discipline rather than a science.
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ZdYnm8vuNR
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So the difference between B and M is that the M is masters. If masters is "better" and they both last 3 years what's the point of doing B? or are masters longer? Also I always thought that masters are after a normal degree
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ZdYnm8vuNR
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One last thing, What about honours? is it always worth doing a honours instead of a normal one?
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winterscoming
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(Original post by ZdYnm8vuNR)
So the difference between B and M is that the M is masters. If masters is "better" and they both last 3 years what's the point of doing B? or are masters longer? Also I always thought that masters are after a normal degree
The Higher Education system in the UK is based on the concept of "levels". So:

A Bachelors degree is a Level 6 course. A typical 3-year full time Bachelors degree covers Levels 4, 5 and 6
A Masters degree is a Level 7 course. A typical 1-year full-time Masters degree covers Level 7.

A Masters degree takes 1 year of full-time study if you've already completed a Level 6 course (i.e Bachelors degree), otherwise if you've only completed Level 3 (e.g. A-Levels) then you can do an Integrated Masters course which is a Bachelors+Masters degree combined, which takes 4 years of full-time study and covers Levels 4, 5, 6 and 7.
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ZdYnm8vuNR
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Thanks a lot for all this information.

So would if you did a BEng then a masters would the masters be only 1 year? (Like the year added if you did MEng from the start?) or would it be 2 years or more?

Also, are courses with (Hons) longer as well? How would they compare to the ones with an integrated masters.

PS. Also theres no difference between BEng and Bsc, and MEng and BEng, right?
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ZdYnm8vuNR
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Alright. Thanks again for all this information, I truly appreciate it.

So, basically the degree being honours is just that you have to do a dissertation at the end and if you get a good enough grade you get it and otherwise you get the degree but without the honours, right?

And a final question (I promise!), earlier you said that as Master courses are more demanding they will have higher entry requirements / will be more competitive, is this the case with places such as oxbridge? Do you have a higher chance of entering by entering for a Bachelors not a masters?
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ZdYnm8vuNR
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(Original post by winterscoming)
The Higher Education system in the UK is based on the concept of "levels". So:

A Bachelors degree is a Level 6 course. A typical 3-year full time Bachelors degree covers Levels 4, 5 and 6
A Masters degree is a Level 7 course. A typical 1-year full-time Masters degree covers Level 7.

A Masters degree takes 1 year of full-time study if you've already completed a Level 6 course (i.e Bachelors degree), otherwise if you've only completed Level 3 (e.g. A-Levels) then you can do an Integrated Masters course which is a Bachelors+Masters degree combined, which takes 4 years of full-time study and covers Levels 4, 5, 6 and 7.
I see, for somewhere such as oxbridge would it be harder to get into if you were to apply for an integrated masters than just a bachelor's degree?
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username738914
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My general mental model:

Real CS degrees - require Maths at A-level or equivalent, usually to A (or higher) standard, but not necessarily. Also includes other CS degrees that don't require Maths (but most people will have it at these unis) with strong fundamentals (Nottingham, Cardiff, Liverpool, RHUL, QMUL and maybe QUB). Pretty much all the most rigorous CS departments in the UK.

CS-lite or more "applied" CS courses:
Places like Lancaster, Newcastle, UEA, Swansea, Aston, Leeds' Applied CS course, any "software engineering" course, etc a lot of universities fit in here.

IT degrees mascarading as CS or "computing" degrees:
mostly very loooow ranked universities

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ZdYnm8vuNR
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(Original post by Princepieman)
My general mental model:

Real CS degrees - require Maths at A-level or equivalent, usually to A (or higher) standard, but not necessarily. Also includes other CS degrees that don't require Maths (but most people will have it at these unis) with strong fundamentals (Nottingham, Cardiff, Liverpool, RHUL, QMUL and maybe QUB). Pretty much all the most rigorous CS departments in the UK.

CS-lite or more "applied" CS courses:
Places like Lancaster, Newcastle, UEA, Swansea, Aston, Leeds' Applied CS course, any "software engineering" course, etc a lot of universities fit in here.

IT degrees mascarading as CS or "computing" degrees:
mostly very loooow ranked universities

Posted from TSR Mobile
And what type (BEng, BSc, MEng, Msc) would the "real" degrees be?

Also, I do agree that if the degree doesn't require maths A level then its not "real" computer science
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username738914
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(Original post by ZdYnm8vuNR)
And what type (BEng, BSc, MEng, Msc) would the "real" degrees be?

Also, I do agree that if the degree doesn't require maths A level then its not "real" computer science
doesn't really matter.

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winterscoming
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(Original post by ZdYnm8vuNR)
I see, for somewhere such as oxbridge would it be harder to get into if you were to apply for an integrated masters than just a bachelor's degree?
I can't see anything on any of the oxbridge websites about an integrated masters. I suspect it's because their entry requirements for the MSc includes having a 1st class undergraduate degree, which obviously they can't predict from A-level grades; even the very best A-level students may not perform so well at university.

But in general, for universities which do offer it as an option, the entry requirements are usually higher for an integrated masters for exactly this reason. It's generally easier to get into a Masters course once you've got your predicted grades from your undergraduate degree - assuming that you're predicted a 2:1 at least.
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