DreamChaser2001
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
//
Last edited by DreamChaser2001; 1 year ago
0
reply
Realitysreflexx
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
(Original post by DreamChaser2001)
I might be interested in applying here, however I have read that it is a relatively new course and heard that it's really politics based? Is it a good course or is it a risky choice?

Anyone here who is doing this course at KCL mind sharing their experience? Would love general opinions too
In economics you will look at alot of political and world issues, because ultimately policy is a big determinant in business and economic systems. Obviously you will also learn the quantitative side of economics ie maths. It wont just be a politics course, that would be a different degree.
1
reply
1234m5678
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 years ago
#3
Hello, I finished my first year in BSc Economics at King's.
The course is new, this was its first year, however at least half of the first year modules have been taught before at different courses at King's (eg. in the Economics&Management course) so the modules are not all new. And I guess the same thing applies to second and third year modules too. Even for those modules which are new, you won't really feel that it's the first year they are teaching them. King's has a great reputation overall and wouldn't start new modules without making sure that they have the right resources (including lecturers) to teach them. You might encounter some teething problems, but I think that's normal.
Regarding your concern about the course being politics based, in the first year we didn't have any politics-based modules. The course is jointly run by the Department of Political Economy and King's Business School, so when it's time to choose your optional modules for the second and third year, you have access to many politics related modules offered by the Department of Political Economy. However, you still have access to modules offered by the Business School which are not politics related at all. It is true that when we had to choose our module options for the second year, we had access to more Political Economy modules and less Business School modules, however we only had to choose 4 so even if someone was not into anything politics related at all, he could choose modules from the Business School (or choose modules from the Department of Political Economy that would seem less politics related to him). So, when it comes to optional modules, you can avoid politics related ones if you're not interested. When it comes to compulsory modules, I haven't yet encounter a compulsory module which would seem politics based - so no one is forced to do something too politics related in this course, unless he chooses to do so in his optional modules.
2
reply
lighth_lawliet
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by 1234m5678)
Hello, I finished my first year in BSc Economics at King's.
The course is new, this was its first year, however at least half of the first year modules have been taught before at different courses at King's (eg. in the Economics&Management course) so the modules are not all new. And I guess the same thing applies to second and third year modules too. Even for those modules which are new, you won't really feel that it's the first year they are teaching them. King's has a great reputation overall and wouldn't start new modules without making sure that they have the right resources (including lecturers) to teach them. You might encounter some teething problems, but I think that's normal.
Regarding your concern about the course being politics based, in the first year we didn't have any politics-based modules. The course is jointly run by the Department of Political Economy and King's Business School, so when it's time to choose your optional modules for the second and third year, you have access to many politics related modules offered by the Department of Political Economy. However, you still have access to modules offered by the Business School which are not politics related at all. It is true that when we had to choose our module options for the second year, we had access to more Political Economy modules and less Business School modules, however we only had to choose 4 so even if someone was not into anything politics related at all, he could choose modules from the Business School (or choose modules from the Department of Political Economy that would seem less politics related to him). So, when it comes to optional modules, you can avoid politics related ones if you're not interested. When it comes to compulsory modules, I haven't yet encounter a compulsory module which would seem politics based - so no one is forced to do something too politics related in this course, unless he chooses to do so in his optional modules.
Hi
Would you say there is any difference employability wise between the Economics and E&M courses? Can you take management modules in the economics course?
0
reply
1234m5678
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
(Original post by Darkesio)
Hi
Would you say there is any difference employability wise between the Economics and E&M courses? Can you take management modules in the economics course?
I cannot answer the question about employability since the BSc Economics course is brand new and my year group will be the first one to graduate, but I don't think there will be a significant difference in employability between the two courses. You can take modules from the Business School in the Economics course, meaning that you can choose from some modules that the Economics & Management students are choosing from, but your options are very limited.
1
reply
lighth_lawliet
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#6
Report 2 years ago
#6
(Original post by 1234m5678)
I cannot answer the question about employability since the BSc Economics course is brand new and my year group will be the first one to graduate, but I don't think there will be a significant difference in employability between the two courses. You can take modules from the Business School in the Economics course, meaning that you can choose from some modules that the Economics & Management students are choosing from, but your options are very limited.
Thanks for your reply

If I was to apply for Economics BSc and get in, would I be able to switch to E&M?
One of the reasons I'm thinking of this is because the management side really does interest me but I can't mention it on my PS as I'm applying for straight econ courses at LSE for example which will not like any non-economics related stuff to be mentioned.
0
reply
1234m5678
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#7
Report 2 years ago
#7
(Original post by Darkesio)
Thanks for your reply

If I was to apply for Economics BSc and get in, would I be able to switch to E&M?
One of the reasons I'm thinking of this is because the management side really does interest me but I can't mention it on my PS as I'm applying for straight econ courses at LSE for example which will not like any non-economics related stuff to be mentioned.
You're welcome! I don't really know, to be honest :/
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Should there be a new university admissions system that ditches predicted grades?

No, I think predicted grades should still be used to make offers (535)
33.97%
Yes, I like the idea of applying to uni after I received my grades (PQA) (648)
41.14%
Yes, I like the idea of receiving offers only after I receive my grades (PQO) (320)
20.32%
I think there is a better option than the ones suggested (let us know in the thread!) (72)
4.57%

Watched Threads

View All