harrietbruce
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I’m really worried I haven’t got enough work experience for the vet med application in October. I decided I wanted to be a vet quite late and have now missed the opportunity for lambing so cannot do this. By the time I apply I will have:2 weeks in small animal practices (80 hours)1 week on an urban farm (40 hours)1 week in a stables (42 hours)1 week at a kennels and cattery (45 hours) And possibly a few days on a dairy farm. Will I have a good chance with the application or is it not strong enough? Thanks in advance.
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AM2/05/2000
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I would check all the minimum requirements on all the vet school websites first!

However I would definitely ensure you do go and do that work experience on a dairy farm!
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harrietbruce
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(Original post by AM2/05/2000)
I would check all the minimum requirements on all the vet school websites first!

However I would definitely ensure you do go and do that work experience on a dairy farm!
I do meet all the requirements but I’m just worried my application won’t be strong enough compared to others, especially since I haven’t got lambing
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Ramzoid
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Lambing was an important one to get when I was applying for Vet Med at Glasgow. Glasgow has a list of various experience they want specifically on their website. I assume the other Vet schools will be the same.
It is where you get most animal husbandry skills out of any of the experience you will do preclinical.
Although it is past the official lambing season, there are places that lamb at different times of the year (manipulated lambing dates due to melatonin administration).
May be worth looking into if March/April next year is too late for when you are applying.
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harrietbruce
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(Original post by Ramzoid)
Lambing was an important one to get when I was applying for Vet Med at Glasgow. Glasgow has a list of various experience they want specifically on their website. I assume the other Vet schools will be the same.
It is where you get most animal husbandry skills out of any of the experience you will do preclinical.
Although it is past the official lambing season, there are places that lamb at different times of the year (manipulated lambing dates due to melatonin administration).
May be worth looking into if March/April next year is too late for when you are applying.
Glasgow isn’t a uni I’m applying to, and the other ones don’t require specific species apart from Liverpool which i meet. I will have a look for any lambing coming up soon though. Thank you
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Little Tail Chaser
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I've seen people get in without having been lambing. It's highly beneficial to do but not essential. I won't sugar coat it, I don't think that 5 weeks is particularly competitive, however there are other aspects to your application that you can do well in. You may not have much work experience but fortunately what you have is fairly varied. I would thoroughly suggest that you do that dairy work, though.

Consider carefully which universities you're applying to as some seem to value the quantity of your work experience over others. Cambridge (and to a lesser extent I'd say maybe Bristol) don't seem to put much emphasis on work experience while Liverpool, Edinburgh, Nottingham and Glasgow are examples of places that do. It's also worth bearing in mind that some universities limit the number of times that you can reapply there, so if you have a particular place that you'd like to apply to it may be worth considering a gap year to improve your application.

If you'd like to try and look for a lambing placement now then your best bet is probably to look for any sheep dairies as they may milk all year around.
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rabbitswhiskers
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I think what you've got should be fine for most of them - ok it's maybe not ideal but you have covered farm, equine and domestic pets in one way or another. Is your 2 weeks with a vet at the same practice or at 2 different ones? A lot of them want to see that you've been to 2 different practices so you have a more varied experience and can compare.

I was in a similar situation to you when I applied last year, I had limited time to do work experience around a full time job. I only managed 3 days lambing and 3 days equine (plus the usual vet practice, 2 weeks at multi-species sanctuaries etc) but I still got 2 offers. If you meet their minimum requirements and present a strong application in other ways, I don't think it would work horribly against you.

Be prepared to talk about things that you have observed and learnt, they do recognise that not everyone is able to do extensive work experience and most seem more interested in what you've gained from the experience than how many weeks you have.
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ouchthathurts
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If you've reached the minimum requirements don't worry too much about it. Having lots of work experience does NOT make someone a better candidate. A broad range of w/exp is useful but not lots and lots of it. Much more important is that you present a well rounded application and personal statement. Have a life, don't put w/exp before other activities, **** knows you need to know how to relax and enjoy yourself while you're at vet school and beyond in practice. This is something that's recognised by the vet schools and profession as a whole too, that there has to be more to life than work. Liverpool have massively dropped their work experience requirements in the past few years to reflect this.

Also not having had any lambing experience is not necessarily going to hurt your application either, it's a limited and awkward time of year, you probably had more important things to be doing with your time anyway that time of year.
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harrietbruce
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(Original post by ouchthathurts)
If you've reached the minimum requirements don't worry too much about it. Having lots of work experience does NOT make someone a better candidate. A broad range of w/exp is useful but not lots and lots of it. Much more important is that you present a well rounded application and personal statement. Have a life, don't put w/exp before other activities, **** knows you need to know how to relax and enjoy yourself while you're at vet school and beyond in practice. This is something that's recognised by the vet schools and profession as a whole too, that there has to be more to life than work. Liverpool have massively dropped their work experience requirements in the past few years to reflect this.

Also not having had any lambing experience is not necessarily going to hurt your application either, it's a limited and awkward time of year, you probably had more important things to be doing with your time anyway that time of year.
I hope so. Maybe I’m just over thinking about my application, but I’ve also managed to arrange a week at an equine vets in the summer so I’ll have 6 in total
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harrietbruce
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(Original post by rabbitswhiskers)
I think what you've got should be fine for most of them - ok it's maybe not ideal but you have covered farm, equine and domestic pets in one way or another. Is your 2 weeks with a vet at the same practice or at 2 different ones? A lot of them want to see that you've been to 2 different practices so you have a more varied experience and can compare.

I was in a similar situation to you when I applied last year, I had limited time to do work experience around a full time job. I only managed 3 days lambing and 3 days equine (plus the usual vet practice, 2 weeks at multi-species sanctuaries etc) but I still got 2 offers. If you meet their minimum requirements and present a strong application in other ways, I don't think it would work horribly against you.

Be prepared to talk about things that you have observed and learnt, they do recognise that not everyone is able to do extensive work experience and most seem more interested in what you've gained from the experience than how many weeks you have.
Yeah the 2 vet weeks is two separate ones in different practices and I’ve also managed to get a week in an equine vets which I’m excited about. What do you mean have a strong application in other ways? Do you mean good grades and out of school activities? Thanks
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rabbitswhiskers
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(Original post by harrietbruce)
What do you mean have a strong application in other ways? Do you mean good grades and out of school activities? Thanks
In part yes, in part it's to do with the next stage of the process too. Some of the universities send out additional information/questionnaires/etc to every applicant or the majority of applicants, and those forms are an opportunity for you to show that you're aware of the profession, what you've learnt, and who you are as a person. Some universities use these as a basis for their shortlisting for their interviews/assessment days, so as long as you pass the minimum requirements, if you do well on these additional things, that gives you a better chance of being shortlisted regardless of any limitations in your work experience. I know someone who got in this year having done absolutely no farm animal work experience at all - so they do take a broader view of who you are and what you have learnt, and not just the number of boxes you have ticked. Best of luck!
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harrietbruce
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(Original post by rabbitswhiskers)
In part yes, in part it's to do with the next stage of the process too. Some of the universities send out additional information/questionnaires/etc to every applicant or the majority of applicants, and those forms are an opportunity for you to show that you're aware of the profession, what you've learnt, and who you are as a person. Some universities use these as a basis for their shortlisting for their interviews/assessment days, so as long as you pass the minimum requirements, if you do well on these additional things, that gives you a better chance of being shortlisted regardless of any limitations in your work experience. I know someone who got in this year having done absolutely no farm animal work experience at all - so they do take a broader view of who you are and what you have learnt, and not just the number of boxes you have ticked. Best of luck!
Oh okay that’s good then. Thank you!
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