Which Programme is better?

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hisumai
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#1
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#1
Which is better to pursue - a Masters degree in Statistics or a Masters degree in Big Data Management and Analytics?

Is it true that pursuing Statistics degree will aid in research if I decide to pursue Ph.D. later?

Whereas, is it true that a Masters degree in Big Data Management and Analytics is better off for Job Purposes since such kind of degree is not that Mathematically rigorous?
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ckfeister
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(Original post by hisumai)
Which is better to pursue - a Masters degree in Statistics or a Masters degree in Big Data Management and Analytics?

Is it true that pursuing Statistics degree will aid in research if I decide to pursue Ph.D. later?

Whereas, is it true that a Masters degree in Big Data Management and Analytics is better off for Job Purposes since such kind of degree is not that Mathematically rigorous?
I personally wouldn't do statistics or big data masters, it is too narrow given that majority of jobs aren't created which we will see in the future and big data will eventually get automated within 10-15 years, look it up.
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hisumai
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(Original post by ckfeister)
I personally wouldn't do statistics or big data masters, it is too narrow given that majority of jobs aren't created which we will see in the future and big data will eventually get automated within 10-15 years, look it up.
It may be true about Big Data that it will get automated in near future but what's the problem with Statistics?

By Statistics, I am referring to Mathematical Statistics, which is considered one of the fundamental disciplines of formal sciences. Secondly, nowadays, the application of Statistics is present in various domains that's why when it comes down to Jobs, shouldn't there will still be a demand of Statisticians in various domains - Manufacturing or Services sector?

Also, which are the subject areas, where more number of jobs will be produced in near future?
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ckfeister
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(Original post by hisumai)
It may be true about Big Data that it will get automated in near future but what's the problem with Statistics?

By Statistics, I am referring to Mathematical Statistics, which is considered one of the fundamental disciplines of formal sciences. Secondly, nowadays, the application of Statistics is present in various domains that's why when it comes down to Jobs, shouldn't there will still be a demand of Statisticians in various domains - Manufacturing or Services sector?

Also, which are the subject areas, where more number of jobs will be produced in near future?
Look up statistics careers, there isn't much, well from what I researched when I considered it as I'm doing Mathematics BSc in September.
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Gregorius
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(Original post by hisumai)
Which is better to pursue - a Masters degree in Statistics or a Masters degree in Big Data Management and Analytics?
It depends upon what your capabilities are and what you want to do with the degree after you've got it. If you are mathematically strong, I'd advise going down the statistics route (and choose a course that is as mathematically rigourous as you can find). If you favour specializing in the actual management of big data (that is, the computer and software architecture side, rather than data analysis), then choose a Data Management course.

Is it true that pursuing Statistics degree will aid in research if I decide to pursue Ph.D. later?
Again, it depends upon what you want to do a PhD in! What was your undergraduate major? In general, statisticians (especially applied statisticians) are in very short supply in academia.

Whereas, is it true that a Masters degree in Big Data Management and Analytics is better off for Job Purposes since such kind of degree is not that Mathematically rigorous?
I'm not sure I follow that reasoning!
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Gregorius
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(Original post by ckfeister)
...and big data will eventually get automated within 10-15 years, look it up.
It will be if you believe science fiction! Working in big data analysis myself, I can assure you that this is very much a fantasy...
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Gregorius
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(Original post by ckfeister)
Look up statistics careers, there isn't much, well from what I researched when I considered it as I'm doing Mathematics BSc in September.
I must admit, I'm puzzled by your finding. Where did you look?
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ckfeister
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(Original post by Gregorius)
It will be if you believe science fiction! Working in big data analysis myself, I can assure you that this is very much a fantasy...
https://www.google.com/search?q=data...t=firefox-b-ab
Feel free to go through the web

(Original post by Gregorius)
I must admit, I'm puzzled by your finding. Where did you look?
Statistic careers have very few vaccines on job agency websites
https://www.indeed.co.uk/statistician-jobs #note this is an example

There is however, high demand for data analyst primarily, for data scientist it usually hovers around 3,000 and usually "perfers " or " requires " masters in statistics/applied mathematics ... I'd rather do applied mathematics masters as more options are open but thats me.

I'm also looking to go into data science industry, targetting big data myself so got a few questions if you don't mind...

1. I'm about to start Mathematic BSc and doing R and Python during the Summer through datacamp, you know what "projects" I could do to build a profilo which would be realistic?
2. What is it like in big data industry?
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Gregorius
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(Original post by ckfeister)
https://www.google.com/search?q=data...t=firefox-b-ab
Feel free to go through the web
As I imply, working in the field myself, I'm a little bit more immune to the nonsense that journalists put out about the subject!

I'm also looking to go into data science industry, targetting big data myself so got a few questions if you don't mind...

1. I'm about to start Mathematic BSc and doing R and Python during the Summer through datacamp, you know what "projects" I could do to build a profilo which would be realistic?
I would strongly suggest getting hold of Kuhn and Johnson's "Applied Predictive Modeling" and James et al. " An Introduction to Statistical Learning" and follow up some of the ideas in there. Your difficulty in doing a university level project may be in getting hold of a good dataset; we tend to guard quality data very closely!

2. What is it like in big data industry?
I'm in academia, working on predictive models in cancer; apart from the politics, it is great fun!
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ckfeister
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(Original post by Gregorius)
As I imply, working in the field myself, I'm a little bit more immune to the nonsense that journalists put out about the subject!



I would strongly suggest getting hold of Kuhn and Johnson's "Applied Predictive Modeling" and James et al. " An Introduction to Statistical Learning" and follow up some of the ideas in there. Your difficulty in doing a university level project may be in getting hold of a good dataset; we tend to guard quality data very closely!



I'm in academia, working on predictive models in cancer; apart from the politics, it is great fun!
haha, and whats the truths then on data science industry? are majority of jobs unadvertised? i'd also have a look at those books tanks!
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hisumai
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(Original post by Gregorius)
It depends upon what your capabilities are and what you want to do with the degree after you've got it. If you are mathematically strong, I'd advise going down the statistics route (and choose a course that is as mathematically rigourous as you can find). If you favour specializing in the actual management of big data (that is, the computer and software architecture side, rather than data analysis), then choose a Data Management course.



Again, it depends upon what you want to do a PhD in! What was your undergraduate major? In general, statisticians (especially applied statisticians) are in very short supply in academia.

I'm not sure I follow that reasoning!



Hello,

I am from a Non-EU country.

My academic background is that I had done my Bachelor Degree in Engineering in a Non-CS discipline. I had studied Engineering Mathematics, Engineering Physics, Probability and Statistics, Industrial Engineering, Operations Research, Intro to Computing, etc.

In Engg. Maths, we had studied Linear algebra, Calculus I, Calculus II, Differential Equations, Numerical Methods, Real Analysis problem Solving, Complex Analysis Problem Solving, Vector calculus, etc.

What it lacked was the rigorous proofs of Analysis, and Abstract algebra.

Now I also have a Masters Degree (completed in 2016) in the area of Statistical quality Control and Operations Research. I studied Fundamental Statistics (mostly Problem Solving, proof to certain extent), Statistical Process Control, Operations research, Reliability theory, Design of Experiments, Multivariate statistics, Six Sigma, etc.

I haven't studied CS formally as a degree programme, except as a subject in my previous degrees and in a Post graduate diploma programme.

So I intend to study Statistics in a rigorous manner in terms of mathematical proofs and Bayesian Statistics and also get basic knowledge about the specialized areas such as Bio statistics, Financial Statistics, Statistical Genetics, etc. before moving on to Pursue PhD in applied Statistics.

So far, I have received study offers as MSc and MRes (PG Taught 1 year) in Statistics at Glasgow university (Sept'18). Also, I have received offer to study at National University of Singapore MSc Statistics Coursework (2 years) (Aug'18). I also have received offer for studying Erasmus Mundus Big Data management and analytics programme (Sep'18).

At this point, I am a bit confused as to where to pursue the Masters programme.

Although in most UK Universities, MRes Programme is categorized as Research Programme, in Glasgow, there is a separate Taught Degree programme MRes and a Research Programme MSc (By research).

So, is that Taught MRes Programme valid in UK?

Regarding Big Data Programme, is it only restricted to management of big data or even structured data analysis or unstructured data analysis is taught in such programme?

In UK, after getting admitted in PhD proramme, does that guarantee monthly PhD scholarship automatically or do I need to apply for it separately?

Based on my academic background, which programme would you suggest I should pursue - the one year masters or the two year masters in Statistics?

I have attached the course curriculum of the degree programmes.
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