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    Hi everyone,

    On Wednesday 11th and Thursday 12th July, students studying mechanical engineering will be online answering your questions about why they applied and what it's like.

    This Q+A is for everyone who is interested in applying for mechanical engineering. This is a great opportunity to speak to students what they like about studying mech eng and what made them choose it.

    Post your questions now and they'll be online across the week to give you advice based on their application experience and current university life.

    Mechanical Engineering at DMU
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    Studying engineering at DMU provides you with the specialist knowledge and skills required to forge a successful career, with students having gone on to work at leading organisations such as Caterpillar, Cummins, Network Rail and Siemens. Get involved with DMU Racing, our Formula Student entry that challenges universities from across the world to design, build and race a single-seat racing car in one year, allowing you to put the knowledge you’ve gained to the test. Accredited by the Institute of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) and the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET), Mechanical Engineering at DMU has a 98% satisfaction rate amongst students, according to the National Student Survey 2017.

    Mechanical Engineering has huge applications in the 21st century, from creating new machines to designing tomorrow’s infrastructure. Find out what it takes here http://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/courses/u...ng-degree.aspx





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    What are mechanical engineering classes like- what do you do in them?

    Why did you choose mechanical engineering over any other type of engineering or physics/maths?
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    How long do you actually spend studying on average? Also how much of a jump is it from a level
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    My parents keep on mentioning to me that engineering is a really good degree to study because there is going to be a shortage in the profession in the future.

    Getting a good job is important to me, but I do want to enjoy my uni experience... do you have any tips on researching engineering courses that will help me get a job but still give me enough space to have fun during my time at uni?

    I'm also starting to look at open days. Did you go to them? How important do you think they are?

    Thanks
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    What made you choose DMU over any other options you might have been considering?

    Have the facilities available to you been suitable for any/all projects you were working on?
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    Was DMU you firm or insurance choice, or did you go through clearing? And how did that experience impact on you when starting your degree?
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    (Original post by theJoyfulGeek)
    What are mechanical engineering classes like- what do you do in them?

    Why did you choose mechanical engineering over any other type of engineering or physics/maths?
    Hi! I'm Jamaal, just finished my second year studying Mech Eng at DMU!

    What are mechanical engineering classes like - what do you do in them?

    Mechanical Engineering classes are engaging and if you’re someone who enjoys Physics, Mechanics and Maths as well as hands-on work it is definitely something you’ll enjoy.

    During first year the Mechanical Engineering course covers the fundamental skills which all engineering students would need, such as:

    -Engineering Mathematics (similar to A-level Maths, however more related to Engineering)

    -Product Design (this class was one of my favourites as it involves working as part of a team to design and construct different solutions to engineering problems based on real life)

    -CAE (Computer Aided Engineering - this involves 3D design using computer software making things like car parts).

    This is just a brief overview of what I did in my first year but if you're into this type of work you'll see it's really enjoyable and unique to DMU!

    Why did you choose mechanical engineering over any other type of engineering or physics/maths?

    I had always seen myself as someone who prefers doing more hands-on work, using my practical and theoretical skills to help find solutions to problems. Seeing some of the work at the DMU open day on the DMU Racing car (DMU's entry for Formula Student) was something that definitely enticed me, in oppose to Maths/Physics which consist largely of theoretical work. I picked Mechanical Engineering over Electrical or Electronic Engineering because I wasn’t too keen on electronics and having studied Physics at A level I felt I already had the fundamentals to help me excel in this course!
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    (Original post by heathersmusical)
    How long do you actually spend studying on average? Also how much of a jump is it from a level

    Hi Heather,

    This does depend entirely on the individual. Some modules that I was more confident in such as Engineering Mathematics I could spend 2 hours a week on and fly through the exams with no issues.

    However with some modules such as CAD (Computer Aided Design) I had to work on a lot more, having never done anything similar in the past at College or secondary school.

    I’d say in total around 10 hours a week increasing it when getting closer to exam time!

    In comparison to A level the jump in difficulty is nothing to be worried about, and you are given a lot more free time in comparison to A levels so make sure you are using your time best as you can!

    Jamaal
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    (Original post by avatarardvark)
    My parents keep on mentioning to me that engineering is a really good degree to study because there is going to be a shortage in the profession in the future.

    Getting a good job is important to me, but I do want to enjoy my uni experience... do you have any tips on researching engineering courses that will help me get a job but still give me enough space to have fun during my time at uni?

    I'm also starting to look at open days. Did you go to them? How important do you think they are?

    Thanks

    Hi Avtarardvark,

    Your parents are definitely right - with all the infrastructure projects currently being commissioned like the HS2 railway, upgrade to the Northern railway system etc. there’s going to be thousands of jobs for future engineers.

    In regards to your question about enjoying your uni experience you shouldn’t worry at all, having studied engineering for the past two years I have had the opportunity to still do so much. One of the examples I can give you is the trip to New York with DMUglobal (one of the opportunities that is unique to DMU) during my first year and to this day it's still one of the most memorable experiences of University so far! Studying is obviously a huge part of university, but there's so much more to it, so don't worry about enjoying it - it's probably the most enjoyable 3 years most people have.

    For researching engineering courses, I'd check course accreditations, like by IET and iMechE (if you go into Mechanical Engineering for example). These are industry recognised and DMU offering them definitely influenced by decision.

    I did go to open days and I would 100% recommend you try to go to one too. As well as giving you an insight into what the courses are about you get to speak to some of the module teachers and who better to give you an insight than a person who has been teaching the course to students for years. You also get an opportunity to look around the university where you could possibly be spending the next three years so a look around your potential campus is really important!

    Jamaal
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    (Original post by shadowdweller)
    What made you choose DMU over any other options you might have been considering?

    Have the facilities available to you been suitable for any/all projects you were working on?

    Hi shadowdweller,

    I chose DMU specifically for my course (Mechanical Engineering) because of the accreditations which are offered by IMechE and IET -something that is very important when looking for a future career in Engineering. UNISTATS was something I checked quite often and seeing the students satisfaction as well as the employability rate for Engineering students at DMU really impressed me and factored into my decision too.

    Other than course-related stuff, the DMUglobal initiative where students get the opportunity to go on subsidised trips around the world that tie in with their studies was something no other university offered and definitely looked like a once in a lifetime opportunity.

    The dedicated Faculty of Technology building contain loads of workshops and IT labs which are open from 9-5 so working on projects has never been an issue in my time here. The DMU library is also 24/7 which coming up to exam season does surprisingly come in handy!

    Jamaal
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    (Original post by 04MR17)
    Was DMU you firm or insurance choice, or did you go through clearing? And how did that experience impact on you when starting your degree?

    Hi 04MR17,

    I came to DMU through clearing after originally studying at another university but deciding to change course after my first year. This had no impact whatsoever on my experience and DMU were more than happy to help accommodate my situation. Most the friends and people I met were during the first few weeks of University during lectures and seminars but your student/university experience isn’t impacted by coming through clearing so don’t worry about that

    Jamaal
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    (Original post by DMU Enquiry Team)
    Hi! I'm Jamaal, just finished my second year studying Mech Eng at DMU!

    What are mechanical engineering classes like - what do you do in them?

    Mechanical Engineering classes are engaging and if you’re someone who enjoys Physics, Mechanics and Maths as well as hands-on work it is definitely something you’ll enjoy.

    During first year the Mechanical Engineering course covers the fundamental skills which all engineering students would need, such as:

    -Engineering Mathematics (similar to A-level Maths, however more related to Engineering)

    -Product Design (this class was one of my favourites as it involves working as part of a team to design and construct different solutions to engineering problems based on real life)

    -CAE (Computer Aided Engineering - this involves 3D design using computer software making things like car parts).

    This is just a brief overview of what I did in my first year but if you're into this type of work you'll see it's really enjoyable and unique to DMU!

    Why did you choose mechanical engineering over any other type of engineering or physics/maths?

    I had always seen myself as someone who prefers doing more hands-on work, using my practical and theoretical skills to help find solutions to problems. Seeing some of the work at the DMU open day on the DMU Racing car (DMU's entry for Formula Student) was something that definitely enticed me, in oppose to Maths/Physics which consist largely of theoretical work. I picked Mechanical Engineering over Electrical or Electronic Engineering because I wasn’t too keen on electronics and having studied Physics at A level I felt I already had the fundamentals to help me excel in this course!
    Thanks so much for the answer Jamaal!
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    Great I found this thread!

    I have a few questions that will hopefully help me decide between doing a math degree or an engineering degree:

    Does one get to prove mathematical theorem/formulae in engineering or does one have to to accept those as true without knowing where they come from?

    What kind of problems do engineers solve? (if you could give an example that would be great!)

    Did you always enjoy working in groups back in school?

    How much programming is there to do in the course?

    Thanks in advance
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    (Original post by TheTroll73)
    Great I found this thread!

    I have a few questions that will hopefully help me decide between doing a math degree or an engineering degree:

    Does one get to prove mathematical theorem/formulae in engineering or does one have to to accept those as true without knowing where they come from?

    What kind of problems do engineers solve? (if you could give an example that would be great!)

    Did you always enjoy working in groups back in school?

    How much programming is there to do in the course?

    Thanks in advance

    Hey,

    Some tough questions! I'll try and answer them as well as I can


    Does one get to prove mathematical theorem/formulae in engineering or does one have to accept those as true without knowing where they come from?

    From what I can recall in first year we didn’t touch upon much of mathematical theorem - a lot of the work we did was involving differentiation, integration and trigonometry... basically a bit of a continuation from A level maths. When formulae did come up we were given proof and explored how they worked. In other modules though such as Mechanical principles and Theory of Machines there’s a lot more formulae that you are working with and get to prove as well as the formula sheets aren’t given with this module so having to derive them can be of help rather than memorising.

    What kind of problems do engineers solve? (if you could give an example that would be great!)

    Yeah, no problem!

    Here’s a very typical Engineering question to do with gears:

    An electric motor drives a piece of machinery through a two stage compound reduction gear where the reduction at each stage is 3:1. The inertia of the motor armature and the driving gear is 0.05 kgm^2 and the intermediate shaft containing the compounded pair is 0.1 kgm^2. The load, output gear and its shaft have an equivalent inertia of 1 kgm^2 referred to the output shaft. It takes two seconds for the motor to accelerate from rest to its running speed of 2700 rev/min - calculate the motor starting torque assuming that it is constant.




    Did you always enjoy working in groups back in school?

    To be honest with the subjects I studies (Maths, Bio, Chem) the closest I got to any form of group work was pairing up during experiments, but I wasn’t the most sociable person as well which didn’t help. However at University it was very different, you may have to work in groups on tasks that are have real-world relevance, making it a lot more enjoyable. Being put in groups of 4-5 people and splitting tasks to people's strengths is really satisfying. For example, a task we had to carry out was making a small circuit car - We assigned the electrical work to the person on the team who enjoys electronics and the mechanics to someone who is good in the workshop. Could be likened to a future project you may have to carry out in your engineering career in terms of delegating work and project management too.



    How much programming is there to do in the course?


    This does vary across which course you pick. I know for first year we touch upon programming such as Matlab and Arduino - this is because the first year is the same across all engineering courses (including Electronic). However as I went into Mechanical Engineering we focused more upon 3D design using programs such as Creo (like solid works) and Autodesk in the following year. I’m sure if programming is something you do enjoy some of the other Engineering courses contain a lot more such as Mechatronics or Electronic.

    Jamaal
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    (Original post by DMU Enquiry Team)
    Hey,

    Some tough questions! I'll try and answer them as well as I can


    Does one get to prove mathematical theorem/formulae in engineering or does one have to accept those as true without knowing where they come from?

    From what I can recall in first year we didn’t touch upon much of mathematical theorem - a lot of the work we did was involving differentiation, integration and trigonometry... basically a bit of a continuation from A level maths. When formulae did come up we were given proof and explored how they worked. In other modules though such as Mechanical principles and Theory of Machines there’s a lot more formulae that you are working with and get to prove as well as the formula sheets aren’t given with this module so having to derive them can be of help rather than memorising.

    What kind of problems do engineers solve? (if you could give an example that would be great!)

    Yeah, no problem!

    Here’s a very typical Engineering question to do with gears:

    An electric motor drives a piece of machinery through a two stage compound reduction gear where the reduction at each stage is 3:1. The inertia of the motor armature and the driving gear is 0.05 kgm^2 and the intermediate shaft containing the compounded pair is 0.1 kgm^2. The load, output gear and its shaft have an equivalent inertia of 1 kgm^2 referred to the output shaft. It takes two seconds for the motor to accelerate from rest to its running speed of 2700 rev/min - calculate the motor starting torque assuming that it is constant.




    Did you always enjoy working in groups back in school?

    To be honest with the subjects I studies (Maths, Bio, Chem) the closest I got to any form of group work was pairing up during experiments, but I wasn’t the most sociable person as well which didn’t help. However at University it was very different, you may have to work in groups on tasks that are have real-world relevance, making it a lot more enjoyable. Being put in groups of 4-5 people and splitting tasks to people's strengths is really satisfying. For example, a task we had to carry out was making a small circuit car - We assigned the electrical work to the person on the team who enjoys electronics and the mechanics to someone who is good in the workshop. Could be likened to a future project you may have to carry out in your engineering career in terms of delegating work and project management too.



    How much programming is there to do in the course?

    This does vary across which course you pick. I know for first year we touch upon programming such as Matlab and Arduino - this is because the first year is the same across all engineering courses (including Electronic). However as I went into Mechanical Engineering we focused more upon 3D design using programs such as Creo (like solid works) and Autodesk in the following year. I’m sure if programming is something you do enjoy some of the other Engineering courses contain a lot more such as Mechatronics or Electronic.

    Jamaal
    Thank you for your answers. Very helpful .
 
 
 
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