Electricity costs for a studio flat

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abhf3
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Hi.

I'm thinking about moving into a studio, how much should I expect to pay for electricity? There is electric heating, a power shower and an electric boiler, also the flat has a prepayment meter so the costs per kWh are about 15 pence and additionally 30 pence per day. I don't have a lot of gadgets except for a laptop, so no TV etc. And the fridge and refrigerator are separate if that is important.

So anyone with experience please?
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abhf3
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Charlotte's Web
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(Original post by abhf3)
Hi.

I'm thinking about moving into a studio, how much should I expect to pay for electricity? There is electric heating, a power shower and an electric boiler, also the flat has a prepayment meter so the costs per kWh are about 15 pence and additionally 30 pence per day. I don't have a lot of gadgets except for a laptop, so no TV etc. And the fridge and refrigerator are separate if that is important.

So anyone with experience please?
It's going to be hard for anyone to predict this for you as it really depends on your lifestyle, how much time you spend in the flat and the sort of appliances etc. you're going to be running. The big thing which can be expensive is electric heating. Things like your shower and fridge/freezer are pretty irrelevant as their electricity use is negligible. Obviously how much you use it is going to depend on the property type and how well it holds its heat. Prepayment meters are often a little more expensive in the long run than normal meters however are much easier in terms of not needing contracts and being able to monitor your usage.
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abhf3
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(Original post by Charlotte's Web)
It's going to be hard for anyone to predict this for you as it really depends on your lifestyle, how much time you spend in the flat and the sort of appliances etc. you're going to be running. The big thing which can be expensive is electric heating. Things like your shower and fridge/freezer are pretty irrelevant as their electricity use is negligible. Obviously how much you use it is going to depend on the property type and how well it holds its heat. Prepayment meters are often a little more expensive in the long run than normal meters however are much easier in terms of not needing contracts and being able to monitor your usage.
Okay thanks. Any number would help me, it really doesn't have to be exact. Should I expect something like £10/week or more like £20+?
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IWMTom
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(Original post by abhf3)
Okay thanks. Any number would help me, it really doesn't have to be exact. Should I expect something like £10/week or more like £20+?
It really is impossible to say without knowing how much electricity you plan on using..
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caseykc
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In my studio flat rent payment my electricity can be included which is the option I chose and it is an extra £10 per week. My mum lives in a 2 bedroom flat on her own and her electricity also works out to about £10 per week so I think that's a safe estimate.
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abhf3
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(Original post by caseykc)
In my studio flat rent payment my electricity can be included which is the option I chose and it is an extra £10 per week. My mum lives in a 2 bedroom flat on her own and her electricity also works out to about £10 per week so I think that's a safe estimate.
Brilliant, thanks! Do you know if your mum has electric heating and an electric boiler?
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abhf3
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(Original post by IWMTom)
It really is impossible to say without knowing how much electricity you plan on using..
Okay. Even averages or anything would be great just for me to get an idea. I understand no one can estimate it for me but it would help if someone said how much they spend with electric heating.
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caseykc
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(Original post by abhf3)
Brilliant, thanks! Do you know if your mum has electric heating and an electric boiler?
I know the heating is definitely electric as it is underfloor but I'm honestly not sure on the boiler.

For my studio flat, because I had the option of adding an extra £10 a week onto my rent for electricity it would likely not cost any more than that as the accommodation wouldn't want to be paying more for my electricity than what I pay them if that makes sense? Just thinking that they would be charging more than that if it was possible people would be using more electricity than that, so I'm thinking that could be the average price/usage. Hope that helps somewhat

Maybe take a look at some advertisements for other studio flats if they say the electricity bill is included and how much etc? Just to get a better feel of how much to expect?
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abhf3
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(Original post by caseykc)
I know the heating is definitely electric as it is underfloor but I'm honestly not sure on the boiler.

For my studio flat, because I had the option of adding an extra £10 a week onto my rent for electricity it would likely not cost any more than that as the accommodation wouldn't want to be paying more for my electricity than what I pay them if that makes sense? Just thinking that they would be charging more than that if it was possible people would be using more electricity than that, so I'm thinking that could be the average price/usage. Hope that helps somewhat

Maybe take a look at some advertisements for other studio flats if they say the electricity bill is included and how much etc? Just to get a better feel of how much to expect?
Thank you so much, that really helps a lot! Unfortunately, there's no all inclusive studios here except in student accommodation but they're like £160/week which is a rip off. Do you mind sharing why you chose a studio over a shared flat or halls?
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Charlotte's Web
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(Original post by abhf3)
Okay thanks. Any number would help me, it really doesn't have to be exact. Should I expect something like £10/week or more like £20+?
I could literally tell you any number without knowing anything about your planned use.

Generally if you are using energy-saving devices, using the heating minimally and generally being careful with your use, most people in studio flats would pay around £10-15 per week on a reasonable energy tariff. As I've explained previously (and a number of other people have), this could be hugely different depending how much time you spend in the flat, how many appliances you run and how often you will use the heating. Energy companies can usually give you a reasonable estimate if you enquire based on the actual property address.
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caseykc
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(Original post by abhf3)
Thank you so much, that really helps a lot! Unfortunately, there's no all inclusive studios here except in student accommodation but they're like £160/week which is a rip off. Do you mind sharing why you chose a studio over a shared flat or halls?
wow £160?? pricey.

I picked a studio over shared flat because sharing a kitchen doesn't really appeal to me. I wouldn't want to be responsible for cleaning up other people's mess and I know I'd feel too pressured to be super clean all the time too
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Rylee98
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£666 every 321 days
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IWMTom
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(Original post by abhf3)
Okay. Even averages or anything would be great just for me to get an idea. I understand no one can estimate it for me but it would help if someone said how much they spend with electric heating.
It would be misleading to give you averages. What you want to do is work out how much electricity you'll use and use your tarrif to calculate your expected costs.

There's loads of good calculators online that let you put all your appliances in and enter the number of hours a day/week/month you plan on using them - this will give you a better picture than some arbitrary number spit out by one of us.

It's the age old saying of "how long is a piece of string?".
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abhf3
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(Original post by caseykc)
wow £160?? pricey.

I picked a studio over shared flat because sharing a kitchen doesn't really appeal to me. I wouldn't want to be responsible for cleaning up other people's mess and I know I'd feel too pressured to be super clean all the time too
Okay, thanks. And £160 is the cheapest one, there's one for £200/week!
(Original post by IWMTom)
It would be misleading to give you averages. What you want to do is work out how much electricity you'll use and use your tarrif to calculate your expected costs.

There's loads of good calculators online that let you put all your appliances in and enter the number of hours a day/week/month you plan on using them - this will give you a better picture than some arbitrary number spit out by one of us.

It's the age old saying of "how long is a piece of string?".
Thanks, I used one of the calculators, it should be £15 on average.
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