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    If you revise adequately, is it 100% sure you will pass your exams? Or you will fail?
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    Depends how you revise. It's about quality not quantity. 4 hours of quality revision is more effective than 8 hours of flipping through a textbook.
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    That depends on like, ALL the factors.
    What do you consider "adequate" amounts of revision?
    Two hours? Twenty?
    All-nighters?
    Full days of non-stop, zero-break, coffee-fueled work?

    Because let me tell you, literally nothing other than the basic facts of the universe is certain on this Earth.
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    There’s no one hundred percent insurance to anything. If you live a healthy perfect life you’re not one hundred percent sure you’ll wake up tomorrow. Other factors may effect your exam e.d headache during the exam, upsetting event prior to it, lack of motivation etc.

    That’s not to say revision isn’t worth it - it totally is! But just make sure you’re looking after your well-being, both physical and mental, to ensue you can grasp the stresses that come with exam season.
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    (Original post by ABM2001)
    There’s no one hundred percent insurance to anything. If you live a healthy perfect life you’re not one hundred percent sure you’ll wake up tomorrow. Other factors may effect your exam e.d headache during the exam, upsetting event prior to it, lack of motivation etc.

    That’s not to say revision isn’t worth it - it totally is! But just make sure you’re looking after your well-being, both physical and mental, to ensue you can grasp the stresses that come with exam season.
    SO what exactly do you mean? Do you mean revision is essential but it is not guaranteed you'll pass
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    (Original post by TripleSlash)
    That depends on like, ALL the factors.
    What do you consider "adequate" amounts of revision?
    Two hours? Twenty?
    All-nighters?
    Full days of non-stop, zero-break, coffee-fueled work?

    Because let me tell you, literally nothing other than the basic facts of the universe is certain on this Earth.
    I will say adequate revision is 2 hours after school 40 sessions each with 20 minute breaks, but on the weekend 5 hours is fine? What do you think and also do you have any techniques or advice on how to have a positive mindset towards your exams and not to be scared of exams.. I perform better when im not scared..
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    (Original post by rockyball89)
    SO what exactly do you mean? Do you mean revision is essential but it is not guaranteed you'll pass


    What I mean is - do your best. Revision is one hundred percent essential but it doesn’t mean you’ll pass with flying colours. It forms part of the equation TO pass, but it does not predict you A*s.

    Think of it like an equation, a formulae.
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    (Original post by ABM2001)
    What I mean is - do your best. Revision is one hundred percent essential but it doesn’t mean you’ll pass with flying colours. It forms part of the equation TO pass, but it does not predict you A*s.

    Think of it like an equation, a formulae.
    I still don't understand mate. Are you trying to say revision is very important? But it doesn't necessarily mean you will pass the exam.. So, are you saying if you are on an A* or something it might just been you had a good paper and you revised.. or...
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    (Original post by rockyball89)
    I still don't understand mate. Are you trying to say revision is very important? But it doesn't necessarily mean you will pass the exam.. So, are you saying if you are on an A* or something it might just been you had a good paper and you revised.. or...
    Revision increases the chances of you doing extremely well. Revision does not, however, guarantee that you will do extremely well. You can have a hard paper or a bad day and it’ll influence your exam result (although in the case of the former it may just lead to lowered grade boundaries)
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    (Original post by rockyball89)
    I still don't understand mate. Are you trying to say revision is very important? But it doesn't necessarily mean you will pass the exam.. So, are you saying if you are on an A* or something it might just been you had a good paper and you revised.. or...
    Sorry, let me try and be more coherent 😄

    How should I explain this.. okay, take the example I mentioned earlier:

    A person lives a perfectly healthy life, doesn’t smoke, drink, no diseases - nothing. Does that mean they’ll wake up the next day alive? Not necessarily.

    Similarly, revising, as you say - adequately - whatever that may be, doesn’t ensure you’ll pass exams perfectly. Anything can happen.

    BUT, what I am saying, is to pass well and succeed, revision is A PART of that success. But not the only part.

    Does that make sense? Sorry to confuse you.
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    (Original post by SkyRunner61)
    Revision increases the chances of you doing extremely well. Revision does not, however, guarantee that you will do extremely well. You can have a hard paper or a bad day and it’ll influence your exam result (although in the case of the former it may just lead to lowered grade boundaries)
    Exactly yes. You explained that much better than me!
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    (Original post by rockyball89)
    I will say adequate revision is 2 hours after school 40 sessions each with 20 minute breaks, but on the weekend 5 hours is fine? What do you think and also do you have any techniques or advice on how to have a positive mindset towards your exams and not to be scared of exams.. I perform better when im not scared..
    This might just be me who thinks this, but that sounds like a lot of revision to be doing for GCSEs and so quite unrealistic if you’re trying to do this for the whole of Year 11. Little and often and effectively is better than hours on end of going through the motions

    In terms of having a positive mindset towards exams, breaking down what you have to do into smaller tasks helps to remove the daunting aspect of revision. Which is where the little and often bit comes in
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    (Original post by ABM2001)
    Exactly yes. You explained that much better than me!
    Glad to hear it! I’ve been told before that I’m quite concise and direct, which can be good or bad depending on the situation :P
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    (Original post by rockyball89)
    SO what exactly do you mean? Do you mean revision is essential but it is not guaranteed you'll pass
    Well no, you could always punch the invigilator and fail
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    (Original post by SkyRunner61)
    Glad to hear it! I’ve been told before that I’m quite concise and direct, which can be good or bad depending on the situation :P
    I can only see positives to that characteristic!

    If you’re thinking of teaching in the future - I’m sure you’ll be excellent!
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    All the way through school - up to the first half of graduate school [masters degree in electrical engineering] i had NO idea what i was doing!! Me dad never finished 8th grade, and me mum finished high school & then took a short course to become a secretary. That was the sum total of 'academic experience' in my family!! Halfway through grad school, i realised that i wasn't going to make it if i didn't 'clean up my act'. The problem was, that i would study (revise) for days and days, and learn lots of stuff - but most of it never appeared on an exam. Most of my revising, therefore was a waste of time - i might as well have been playing video games.

    I figured out, what i had to do, was to study almost exclusively what i WAS going to be asked on the exams. In order to 'suss out' what the instructor thought was important, i kept track of the amount of lecture time that they spent on each 'topic', and how much work they did - when they were covering it. As an example - if they took 20 minutes to cover 'topic a', in which they talked about it for 5 minutes, and then spent the next 15 minutes drawing diagrams on the board, i would assign a 'weight' of 1 to 3 for 'just talking', and 4 to 6 for drawing on the board. For a medium complexity talk i would multiply 2 by the 5 minutes - giving a total of 10, and add that to the drawing part - which was 15 times 5 (for a medium complexity drawing). This resulted in a 'weighted score' of 75 for the drawing part. Adding the two together gives 85 for the coverage on the topic on that date. I would then add together the 'weighted score' for every time that topic was mentioned - to get the total score for that topic. I then 'ranked' all the topics in decending total score. Figuring that there was time to work 5 or 6 problems on an average exam in electrical engineering, i would take the top 8 or 9 topics, and learn everything i could about them - working problems i had constructed in the same way as class or assigned problems on those topics.

    The first time i did this - i hit the guy 100% - i had every exam problem (on the real test), and NO extras. it was a 'slam dunk' - i did an hour exam in 12 minutes. I then took 5 minutes to check my work. A total of 17 minutes to do a 1 hour exam!! My performance on exams increased dramatically after that!! The two other guys in my study group couldn't believe it. When i first showed them my 'sample exam' (1 week before the real test), they didn't like any of the problems. When we walked out of the real exam, they asked: "HOW did you do that???"

    Best of luck!!
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    Remember: failing to prepare is preparing to fail.
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    (Original post by Rabbit2)
    All the way through school - up to the first half of graduate school [masters degree in electrical engineering] i had NO idea what i was doing!! Me dad never finished 8th grade, and me mum finished high school & then took a short course to become a secretary. That was the sum total of 'academic experience' in my family!! Halfway through grad school, i realised that i wasn't going to make it if i didn't 'clean up my act'. The problem was, that i would study (revise) for days and days, and learn lots of stuff - but most of it never appeared on an exam. Most of my revising, therefore was a waste of time - i might as well have been playing video games.

    I figured out, what i had to do, was to study almost exclusively what i WAS going to be asked on the exams. In order to 'suss out' what the instructor thought was important, i kept track of the amount of lecture time that they spent on each 'topic', and how much work they did - when they were covering it. As an example - if they took 20 minutes to cover 'topic a', in which they talked about it for 5 minutes, and then spent the next 15 minutes drawing diagrams on the board, i would assign a 'weight' of 1 to 3 for 'just talking', and 4 to 6 for drawing on the board. For a medium complexity talk i would multiply 2 by the 5 minutes - giving a total of 10, and add that to the drawing part - which was 15 times 5 (for a medium complexity drawing). This resulted in a 'weighted score' of 75 for the drawing part. Adding the two together gives 85 for the coverage on the topic on that date. I would then add together the 'weighted score' for every time that topic was mentioned - to get the total score for that topic. I then 'ranked' all the topics in decending total score. Figuring that there was time to work 5 or 6 problems on an average exam in electrical engineering, i would take the top 8 or 9 topics, and learn everything i could about them - working problems i had constructed in the same way as class or assigned problems on those topics.

    The first time i did this - i hit the guy 100% - i had every exam problem (on the real test), and NO extras. it was a 'slam dunk' - i did an hour exam in 12 minutes. I then took 5 minutes to check my work. A total of 17 minutes to do a 1 hour exam!! My performance on exams increased dramatically after that!! The two other guys in my study group couldn't believe it. When i first showed them my 'sample exam' (1 week before the real test), they didn't like any of the problems. When we walked out of the real exam, they asked: "HOW did you do that???"

    Best of luck!!
    So basically you’re saying to try to predict what topics will come up, just much longer
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    (Original post by rockyball89)
    If you revise adequately, is it 100% sure you will pass your exams? Or you will fail?
    No it's not 100%.
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    (Original post by SkyRunner61)
    This might just be me who thinks this, but that sounds like a lot of revision to be doing for GCSEs and so quite unrealistic if you’re trying to do this for the whole of Year 11. Little and often and effectively is better than hours on end of going through the motions

    In terms of having a positive mindset towards exams, breaking down what you have to do into smaller tasks helps to remove the daunting aspect of revision. Which is where the little and often bit comes in
    How many hours will you suggest I'm planning to revise for year 11 in this summer all the way to my real exams so that's basically 10 months to revise lol
 
 
 
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