Do you think being a YouTuber is an easy way of making money? Watch

RandomTennisfan
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Yeah so basically I watch a fair amount of YouTube content from different creators,
and I have this question circling around my head a lot. What I’m getting at is the bigger youtubers who make a lot out of putting videos out, PewDiePie, KSI, Casey Niestat etc.
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Nihilisticb*tch
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No it's not an easy way of making money as there is a lot of luck involved. Many people will make high quality videos to rival the most popular Youtubers but never gain more than 1000 subscribers (so earn almost nothing), whereas some will make half assed videos but grow very quickly and thus can invest in making their videos better. I think once you've gotten big then yes it's a very easy way of making a lot of money but for someone just starting out then not so much.
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CTLeafez
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The Vlogger/Youtuber sector is over-saturated as it is. Very few Youtubers make enough via ad-revenue and/or sponsorship to support themselves purely on video-making. The vast majority will make a couple videos, either continue because they are in it for the enjoyment or they'll quit once they realise they ain't the next Pewdiepie and won't be willing in a mansion.

It may be easy to make a small amount of money, but it's certainly hard to be niche enough to attract enough attention to be fully supported by it.
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RandomTennisfan
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That’s what I meant, when you’re a big channel it’s kushty. If you know Simon(miniminter) he sent out a tweet to New York Red Bulls then got invited to a box seat and to see the whole set up there, Vikkstar aka Vik gets vip access to festivals.
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RandomTennisfan
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(Original post by CTLeafez)
The Vlogger/Youtuber sector is over-saturated as it is. Very few Youtubers make enough via ad-revenue and/or sponsorship to support themselves purely on video-making. The vast majority will make a couple videos, either continue because they are in it for the enjoyment or they'll quit once they realise they ain't the next Pewdiepie and won't be willing in a mansion.

It may be easy to make a small amount of money, but it's certainly hard to be niche enough to attract enough attention to be fully supported by it.
There are too many vloggers, PewDiePie changed his content which worked for the better, commenting on stuff in society aka trends. You need to be unique these days look at TGFBro for instance, they’re different and got plenty of subs.
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CTLeafez
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(Original post by RandomTennisfan)
You need to be unique these days look at TGFBro for instance, they’re different and got plenty of subs.
Very true, although some have realised changing up what they causes them to lose a LOT of subs. Recent example being Emma Blackery; she's realised now to give her fans what they want or face losing your fanbase.

Maybe I'm getting old but I've never heard of TGFBro I see my little sister watching these vloggers who genuinely look like fetuses... It's quite strange to start seeing a new generation of youtubers appearing. I remember the pre-YT era and the very first videos. There definitely used to be a lot more animated videos back in the day. e.g 'Pokemon Spoof' - A classic which I still quote to this day :')
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JinxBinx
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you have to be unique and persistent is probably the best advice for a youtuber, a lot of it depends on your location and type of videos you make so you should switch it up
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FightToWin
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Isn't there a certain amount of subscribers you need to reach before you can make any money from the videos? At least a few thousand I think, and to reach that amount you need to be good. Like really good. It's an easy way of making money yes, but by no means a quick one, and you need to be a certain type of person to get people to subscribe.
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RandomTennisfan
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(Original post by CTLeafez)
Very true, although some have realised changing up what they causes them to lose a LOT of subs. Recent example being Emma Blackery; she's realised now to give her fans what they want or face losing your fanbase.

Maybe I'm getting old but I've never heard of TGFBro I see my little sister watching these vloggers who genuinely look like fetuses... It's quite strange to start seeing a new generation of youtubers appearing. I remember the pre-YT era and the very first videos. There definitely used to be a lot more animated videos back in the day. e.g 'Pokemon Spoof' - A classic which I still quote to this day :')
I may fall into the young category still in general terms but I’m 20 and like TGFBro as they do really Extreme challenges like getting locked inside a vending machine or building Ikea furniture on zero hours sleep. Yeah Emma BlackBerry used to be on WhatCulture, I think she just works as presenter now and manages her YouTube channel?
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RandomTennisfan
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(Original post by JinxBinx)
you have to be unique and persistent is probably the best advice for a youtuber, a lot of it depends on your location and type of videos you make so you should switch it up
Very true, a lot aren’t persistent as it requires a lot of time and you need connections early on even with something like YouTube or just a lucky break through, KSI was the first guy to react playing Fifa and come up with original series like Road to D1, for PewDiePie Horror, and Casey Niestat filming creative videos.
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CTLeafez
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(Original post by RandomTennisfan)
I may fall into the young category still in general terms but I’m 20 and like TGFBro as they do really Extreme challenges like getting locked inside a vending machine or building Ikea furniture on zero hours sleep. Yeah Emma BlackBerry used to be on WhatCulture, I think she just works as presenter now and manages her YouTube channel?
I'm 22 in November so we aren't too far apart in age, maybe I'm just a little nostalgic. TGFBro sounds... Interesting. Ngl, not my cup of tea. I do like Kurzgesagt, SciShow, Shane Dawson occasionally.
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RandomTennisfan
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(Original post by FightToWin)
Isn't there a certain amount of subscribers you need to reach before you can make any money from the videos? At least a few thousand I think, and to reach that amount you need to be good. Like really good. It's an easy way of making money yes, but by no means a quick one, and you need to be a certain type of person to get people to subscribe.
Yes it was more a question of whether it’s easy doing it whilst you’re at the top I.e got 100 k subs etc and have a schedule you can stick to. I understand the grind it takes as a smaller youtuber no one noticing your work.
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RandomTennisfan
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(Original post by CTLeafez)
I'm 22 in November so we aren't too far apart in age, maybe I'm just a little nostalgic. TGFBro sounds... Interesting. Ngl, not my cup of tea. I do like Kurzgesagt, SciShow, Shane Dawson occasionally.
Ah I think we have different tastes then man as I don’t watch any of those guys, YouTube is great for me when I need to unwind though. I sometimes post content only for fun I don’t aim to get subs.
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Dheorl
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Is it easy to get into? No. Once you're there is it easy to do? Well that depends.

Take for instance someone like SuperTramp vs a gaming channel.

The videos SuperTramp put out require a lot of prep work, in the way of organising the trips/activities, collecting a group to participate (many are friends, but others get called in and even coordinating a large group of friends isn't always easy), perhaps finding and hiring in specialists to help construct whatever the activity is based around, sorting out insurance, sorting out a crew to help you film, the logistics of getting said crew, friends and equipment to location, the editing together of hours of footage, sourcing and licensing music and so on.

Now compare that to a gamer. They have to sit down, play games with recording software turned on, and then often send it off to a 3rd party for editing. They likely won't make as much, and in my eyes won't have as much fun doing it, but for effort put in vs money made I think they're in a much better spot on the graph so to speak.
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RandomTennisfan
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(Original post by Dheorl)
Is it easy to get into? No. Once you're there is it easy to do? Well that depends.

Take for instance someone like SuperTramp vs a gaming channel.

The videos SuperTramp put out require a lot of prep work, in the way of organising the trips/activities, collecting a group to participate (many are friends, but others get called in and even coordinating a large group of friends isn't always easy), perhaps finding and hiring in specialists to help construct whatever the activity is based around, sorting out insurance, sorting out a crew to help you film, the logistics of getting said crew, friends and equipment to location, the editing together of hours of footage, sourcing and licensing music and so on.

Now compare that to a gamer. They have to sit down, play games with recording software turned on, and then often send it off to a 3rd party for editing. They likely won't make as much, and in my eyes won't have as much fun doing it, but for effort put in vs money made I think they're in a much better spot on the graph so to speak.
Oh yeah for sure I agree with you, I watch Brave Wilderness who puts in so much work with his team travelling and filming educational animal videos, compared to someone like WillNE who is a react channel, it just doesn’t compare or to say a vlogger who films a short snippet of their day and compiles the clips together. So in short it’s dependant on what your content is and how easy it is making money from it then.
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Dheorl
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(Original post by RandomTennisfan)
Oh yeah for sure I agree with you, I watch Brave Wilderness who puts in so much work with his team travelling and filming educational animal videos, compared to someone like WillNE who is a react channel, it just doesn’t compare or to say a vlogger who films a short snippet of their day and compiles the clips together. So in short it’s dependant on what your content is and how easy it is making money from it then.
Tbh I think vloggers actually do a decent amount of work, purely because it can disrupt your day so much. Sure, some will just do pure speech to camera, but they're rarely very successful. Good shots take a lot more work than you see. Take for instance a shot pulling up to park, only 5 seconds worth of footage but adds a lot of context and "production value". They've had to pull up, either place a camera and pray no-one steals it or drop off a friend with a camera, pull off again, circle the block or whatever then actually park. You've just turned a 20 second activity into a 5 min activity, all for 5 seconds of footage. Do that throughout the day and it could get tiring fast. It also requires some serious creative talent, especially with the amount of competition.
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RandomTennisfan
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(Original post by Dheorl)
Tbh I think vloggers actually do a decent amount of work, purely because it can disrupt your day so much. Sure, some will just do pure speech to camera, but they're rarely very successful. Good shots take a lot more work than you see. Take for instance a shot pulling up to park, only 5 seconds worth of footage but adds a lot of context and "production value". They've had to pull up, either place a camera and pray no-one steals it or drop off a friend with a camera, pull off again, circle the block or whatever then actually park. You've just turned a 20 second activity into a 5 min activity, all for 5 seconds of footage. Do that throughout the day and it could get tiring fast. It also requires some serious creative talent, especially with the amount of competition.
Yeah I get you I used to study media production at college so I know the creative process I just feel like vlogging is easy compared to what some other big channels do. Good vloggers I watch is Casey Niestat, LifeofTom sometimes FunforLouis. I don’t buy into the fake positivity vlogs that Roman Atwood & Alfie and Caspar churn out. A vlog is very personal, it is hard I give you to know what to film and include.
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Dheorl
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(Original post by RandomTennisfan)
Yeah I get you I used to study media production at college so I know the creative process I just feel like blogging is easy compared to what some other big channels do. Good vloggers I watch is Casey Niestat & LifeofTom sometimes FunforLouis. I don’t buy into the fake positivity vlogs that Roman Atwood & Alfie and Caspar churn out. A vlog is very personal, it is hard I give you to know what to film and include.
Tbh about the only vlog I've properly watched is Jon Olsson's, oh, and the occasional one on the sub channel of Demolition Ranch. Olsson's has got some legit production quality, whereas the ranch one tbh is just talk to camera, but the guys got a sincere enough personality to carry it IMO. Casey and so on I just found very samey and pretentious, but personal opinion I guess.

I think vlogging can just be a different kind of hard if done well. Individually the videos certainly require less prep, but I think it's a much more mentally demanding thing to do.
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shadowdweller
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I don't think it's easy, no - the number of 'famous' YouTubers compared to the number in general is a testament to that. Additionally even if you do get the number of subscribers you need, the quality and quantity of content you'd need to generate to make a good amount of money would be a huge time consumer.
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RandomTennisfan
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(Original post by shadowdweller)
I don't think it's easy, no - the number of 'famous' YouTubers compared to the number in general is a testament to that. Additionally even if you do get the number of subscribers you need, the quality and quantity of content you'd need to generate to make a good amount of money would be a huge time consumer.
Ok I will have to respectfully disagree, thanks for sharing an opinion though, I like debates like this with different viewpoints. The YouTube scene is in a bad place atm, all about fake drama still and promo deals etc, it’s essy for guys at the top but harder than ever for guys starting out.
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