I don't understand joint honours degrees

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Nihilisticb*tch
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I know that joint honours degrees are where you so two subjects but I don't know a lot of the details about that. Do you do less content in each subject or do you do the same amount? Also, what's the difference between a degree where it's [insert subject name here] and [insert subject name here] vs [insert subject name here] with [insert subject name here]. Like is there a significance in the use of the word "and" vs "with".
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CTLeafez
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Well some courses can be 'BSc/BA ____ and ____' and not be joint honours, just the complicate things a tad more .

My course is 'BSc Genetics and Molecular Biology' and as far as I know, I'm not doing joint honours. I just do 360 credits over three years.

My friend however does do a joint honours degree: 'BA Dance and Drama'. She does 120 credits per year (Same as me) but she does a combination of the modules required for the 'BA Dance' and the 'BA Drama' degrees. Like a mix and match.
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Nihilisticb*tch
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(Original post by CTLeafez)
Well some courses can be 'BSc/BA ____ and ____' and not be joint honours, just the complicate things a tad more .

My course is 'BSc Genetics and Molecular Biology' and as far as I know, I'm not doing joint honours. I just do 360 credits over three years.

My friend however does do a joint honours degree: 'BA Dance and Drama'. She does 120 credits per year (Same as me) but she does a combination of the modules required for the 'BA Dance' and the 'BA Drama' degrees. Like a mix and match.
Wow I'm confused. So what differentiates a joint honours and a not joint honours degree.
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CTLeafez
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(Original post by Nihilisticb*tch)
Wow I'm confused. So what differentiates a joint honours and a not joint honours degree.
From what I know, I think it's joint honours when the credits which make up your overall qualification is made up of modules/credits from differing courses provided by the University.
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Nihilisticb*tch
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(Original post by CTLeafez)
From what I know, I think it's joint honours when the credits which make up your overall qualification is made up of modules/credits from differing courses provided by the University.
I am unfamiliar with a lot of stuff about university so I don't really understand what credits are.
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Dalek1099
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(Original post by Nihilisticb*tch)
I know that joint honours degrees are where you so two subjects but I don't know a lot of the details about that. Do you do less content in each subject or do you do the same amount? Also, what's the difference between a degree where it's [insert subject name here] and [insert subject name here] vs [insert subject name here] with [insert subject name here]. Like is there a significance in the use of the word "and" vs "with".
With most single subject degree programmes there will be Core Modules and Optional Modules and for Joint Honours programmes you will normally study the Core Modules for both the subjects that you are doing until maybe the final year where there is less/no Core Modules for the single subject degree programmes.

Joint Honours students will have normally studied the same content that everyone has on the single subject degree programmes but with their Optional Modules they have studied another subject and often these programmes consist of two similar subjects like with Chemistry and Physics or Physics and Mathematics so its not exactly like saying you aren't studying that subject as much as single subject students just studying it in a more applied/less applied way for your optional modules.

The down side of Joint Honours degree programmes is that because you have to do the Core Modules for both subjects you will have little/no choice for your first and second year but you will normally have some choice for your final year.

I am not actually studying a Joint Honours degree programme but I am studying two subjects as part of Natural Sciences which is also an option at many universities. My degree is closely linked to the structure of the Joint Honours degree programme though with a bit of added flexibility, you are advised for my course to look at the Joint Honours degree programme for guidance, so I know what I'm talking about.
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Nihilisticb*tch
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(Original post by Dalek1099)
With most single subject degree programmes there will be Core Modules and Optional Modules and for Joint Honours programmes you will normally study the Core Modules for both the subjects that you are doing until maybe the final year where there is less/no Core Modules for the single subject degree programmes.

Joint Honours students will have normally studied the same content that everyone has on the single subject degree programmes but with their Optional Modules they have studied another subject and often these programmes consist of two similar subjects like with Chemistry and Physics or Physics and Mathematics so its not exactly like saying you aren't studying that subject as much as single subject students just studying it in a more applied/less applied way for your optional modules.

The down side of Joint Honours degree programmes is that because you have to do the Core Modules for both subjects you will have little/no choice for your first and second year but you will normally have some choice for your final year.
okay thank you for your explanation
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University of Derby
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Hi Nihilisticb*tch,

You've had some great responses here that have explained Joint Honours in a really clear way. At Derby, every full time undergraduate student takes 6 modules (or topics) throughout the year. But for Joint Honours you take 3 in each subject, instead of all 6 being in one area. So you still gain all the core skills, but you don’t have to do double the work!

I'll try and answer your question of what's the difference between a Joint Honours and a degree where the combination is already set in the title. What you'll increasingly find now is that universities have found popular combinations that provide alternatives to their better-known programmes, and so they actively recommend them as programmes within that area.

But Joint Honours allows you much more flexibility in your combination as you can combine two totally different courses, across different disciplines if you want to. That allows you to join subjects together that suit your career ideas more than what a prescriptive course list says. You’re also encouraged to apply the skills or knowledge you've gained in one of your choices to the other subject.

Are you applying for this year? Our Joint Honours courses can be applied for in Clearing the same way as you would a single honours course – if you call our Clearing hotline, just tell the operator what you’re looking to study. You can find out which of our courses are available in our Clearing thread – just look for ‘(Joint Honours)’ after the title, or see our combination zones here.

Let me know if you have any other question - hope that helps you understand it more.

Ryan
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Minerva
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(Original post by Nihilisticb*tch)
I know that joint honours degrees are where you so two subjects but I don't know a lot of the details about that. Do you do less content in each subject or do you do the same amount? Also, what's the difference between a degree where it's [insert subject name here] and [insert subject name here] vs [insert subject name here] with [insert subject name here]. Like is there a significance in the use of the word "and" vs "with".
"and" usually means a roughly 50:50 split between the two subjects; "with" usually means that you'll spend more of your time on the first named subject. However, at many universities even single honours courses allow you to take one or two 'out of discipline' modules provided all the compulsory ground for the main subject is covered and the timetables work out.

There isn't really a standard answer to your question - you'll need to look course prospectuses individually. If you are looking for courses that tend to have high flexibility, check out the Scottish unis in particular, but also unis like Lancaster.
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