what you wished you had done in year 12? Watch

__itsme
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I'm starting sixth form September 2018.Do any year 13's or uni students have any advice for me.I'm taking biology,chemistry,math and English lit (but i might drop it)
1. what should i bring to school?
2.how much revision should i do?
3.should i use PDF or paper textbooks?
4.how do i make friends in a new school?
5.tips for the subjects i've chosen?
6.how should i spend my free's?
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tegs*99
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A lot will depend on your subjects and out of the subjects you chose I only took English. I always brought pens and highlighters, I had one pencil I never used and I brought lined paper and a plastic popper file to store paper from the week to transfer home to large ring binders. Amount of revision is entirely subjective, don’t work a certain amount of hours work what you need aka revise enough to pass class tests and understand content and finish any homework set. I used paper because I can’t revise off a screen and so always have to print a load of stuff off it depends who you are, loads of people brought laptops and had online notes but I’m not technological. Sometimes teachers may want essays for English I typed those and brought them in. I also managed to accidentally merge my laptop files with my phone don’t know how I did it I was trying to do something unrelated but it was useful if you can do it. I wasn’t new to my sixth form as it was my same school but I don’t think you’ll have a problem as everyone is really open to new people and the new people who joined my school slipped in to existing groups easily. My friends for example gained two people. English specific tip that changed my English revision highlight key quotes in text as you are going along bookmark them with a sticky tab so it’s easier to make quote cards for revision. Don’t stress about free periods to much in year 12 use them when you need but also take a break if you can and want. The only time I worked flat out was the last two terms of year 13 (after Xmas) and a few weeks before my two AS subjects as this was revision. Now AS exams are gone I see no reason to work too much in Year 12 but it’s all personal. I also want to say though don’t worry about starting year 12 too much you’ll learn methods and routines that suit you very quickly, the opening weeks are all about getting used to your subjects and teachers and the school as you’re new anyway so you’ll have time to adjust. I’ve just left year 13 and looking back the jump wasn’t as bad as it had looked before I started but then hindsight can be a bad premise to make assumptions from.
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tegs*99
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Mostly I wish that I re wrote notes as some of the handwriting was illegible from where I had to write so fast in class it became a pain to revise from but that’s only because I have messy handwriting naturally
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Snoozinghamster
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For chem (and probably bio) make sure that you write up practicals as soon as you do them, and I’d suggest you either type them or write up the method to not hand in so you have a copy of the method you can use for revision regarding how to do different practicals
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TheTroll73
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don't worry too much and enjoy your summer

you will be fine
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__itsme
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(Original post by tegs*99)
Mostly I wish that I re wrote notes as some of the handwriting was illegible from where I had to write so fast in class it became a pain to revise from but that’s only because I have messy handwriting naturally
thanks so much,i have messy handwriting to so i will make sure to rewrite any class notes
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__itsme
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(Original post by Snoozinghamster)
For chem (and probably bio) make sure that you write up practicals as soon as you do them, and I’d suggest you either type them or write up the method to not hand in so you have a copy of the method you can use for revision regarding how to do different practicals
thanks i've read the spec for chem and biology and both have quite a few practicals so i will make sure i will write them up as i go.
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__itsme
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(Original post by TheTroll73)
don't worry too much and enjoy your summer

you will be fine
I wish i could but im so exited and quite nervous for sixth form,lots of people have said that its so hard.also results day is 4 weeks away so im super stressed for that but i'll try to enjoy my summer =)
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Mochi1185
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(Original post by __itsme)
I'm starting sixth form September 2018.Do any year 13's or uni students have any advice for me.I'm taking biology,chemistry,math and English lit (but i might drop it)
1. what should i bring to school?
2.how much revision should i do?
3.should i use PDF or paper textbooks?
4.how do i make friends in a new school?
5.tips for the subjects i've chosen?
6.how should i spend my free's?
-Rewrite your notes as soon as you get the chance by using a textbook so that you can add in extra details that you may have missed. When it comes to revision it will be a lot easier to read over notes knowing that all the information is on paper.
- Read ahead, even if it’s just the basics. For subjects such as biology and chemistry (I don’t do maths or english lit so I’m not sure about those) reading ahead will actually help a lot in ensuring you don’t sit there confused in class
-past paper questions, once you know the topic attempt at least one past paper question. I don’t mean do 2 past papers a day because you’ll burn out by the end of the year but it’ll help in knowing what type of questions you will get
-make flashcards or mindmaps as you go on through the year. During class I would write important information on flashcards and then do a topic summary mindmap at the end of the topic but this is pretty subjective.
- For biology and chemistry, keep your lab book up to date! A lot of people in my year had to write up 6 practicals during mock week because they couldn’t be bothered to earlier on in the year. Print out the method from the practical handbook to use in class and then rewrite the method in your own words at home.
-Spend frees effectively, I spent so much time at a desk just doodling on my paper instead of getting work done. It’s really your choice if you want to use online textbooks or paper textbooks. I used the actual textbooks and would read through the chapter making bullet points as I went along. Using a computer may be more helpful in researching something you don’t quite understand.
-Once you start assessments and end of unit tests use the feedback you get to actually make improvements. For biology and chemistry there are a lot of questions that have the same word for word markscheme. Electron microscopes and their advantage over light microscopes is a common 2 marker while the definition on ionisation energy is common in chemistry.
I wouldn’t stress out too much since the first couple of weeks are really to see if you enjoy the subject. Please don’t say that you hate a subject because of a teacher, it’s about the content and learning rather than who teaches it. The jump from GCSE to first year of a levels will seem big but if you keep on learning as you go along then you’ll find revision a lot easier. Also, the amount of time spent revising is really up to personal preference just find what works for you and you should be fine.
Good luck for results day!
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__itsme
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(Original post by Mochi1185)
-Rewrite your notes as soon as you get the chance by using a textbook so that you can add in extra details that you may have missed. When it comes to revision it will be a lot easier to read over notes knowing that all the information is on paper.
- Read ahead, even if it’s just the basics. For subjects such as biology and chemistry (I don’t do maths or english lit so I’m not sure about those) reading ahead will actually help a lot in ensuring you don’t sit there confused in class
-past paper questions, once you know the topic attempt at least one past paper question. I don’t mean do 2 past papers a day because you’ll burn out by the end of the year but it’ll help in knowing what type of questions you will get
-make flashcards or mindmaps as you go on through the year. During class I would write important information on flashcards and then do a topic summary mindmap at the end of the topic but this is pretty subjective.
- For biology and chemistry, keep your lab book up to date! A lot of people in my year had to write up 6 practicals during mock week because they couldn’t be bothered to earlier on in the year. Print out the method from the practical handbook to use in class and then rewrite the method in your own words at home.
-Spend frees effectively, I spent so much time at a desk just doodling on my paper instead of getting work done. It’s really your choice if you want to use online textbooks or paper textbooks. I used the actual textbooks and would read through the chapter making bullet points as I went along. Using a computer may be more helpful in researching something you don’t quite understand.
-Once you start assessments and end of unit tests use the feedback you get to actually make improvements. For biology and chemistry there are a lot of questions that have the same word for word markscheme. Electron microscopes and their advantage over light microscopes is a common 2 marker while the definition on ionisation energy is common in chemistry.
I wouldn’t stress out too much since the first couple of weeks are really to see if you enjoy the subject. Please don’t say that you hate a subject because of a teacher, it’s about the content and learning rather than who teaches it. The jump from GCSE to first year of a levels will seem big but if you keep on learning as you go along then you’ll find revision a lot easier. Also, the amount of time spent revising is really up to personal preference just find what works for you and you should be fine.
Good luck for results day!
thanks so much im defo going to be using your advice in the future,btw what grades did you get in biology and chemistry(im really curious)
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_gcx
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If you're going to have to pay for paper textbooks then pdf textbooks are probably the way to go.
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Mochi1185
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(Original post by __itsme)
thanks so much im defo going to be using your advice in the future,btw what grades did you get in biology and chemistry(im really curious)
As in both bio and chem, could’ve done better if I just focused earlier on
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Little Popcorns
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(Original post by __itsme)
I'm starting sixth form September 2018.Do any year 13's or uni students have any advice for me.I'm taking biology,chemistry,math and English lit (but i might drop it)
1. what should i bring to school?
2.how much revision should i do?
3.should i use PDF or paper textbooks?
4.how do i make friends in a new school?
5.tips for the subjects i've chosen?
6.how should i spend my free's?
1. Note pad and a file to store things for the days work (you should have individual files at home for all the work that you’ll build up whilst there).

2. You’re doing quite traditionally difficult subjects so you will need to put aside a lot of time. But make sure you’re finding time to sleep, relax and meet friends at the less revision intensive times.

3. Ideally you’ll have a paper copy but if it’s also available free through college library services too that may be handy sometimes.

4. Be friendly, ask questions, get to know them, spend the occasional free together or join clubs/societies.

5. Didn’t do these subjects but so you’ll have to take note from others.

6. In revision intensive times and generally if you want to do well go to the library! There’ll be some time to chill here and there too.
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__itsme
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(Original post by Little Popcorns)
1. Note pad and a file to store things for the days work (you should have individual files at home for all the work that you’ll build up whilst there).

2. You’re doing quite traditionally difficult subjects so you will need to put aside a lot of time. But make sure you’re finding time to sleep, relax and meet friends at the less revision intensive times.

3. Ideally you’ll have a paper copy but if it’s also available free through college library services too that may be handy sometimes.

4. Be friendly, ask questions, get to know them, spend the occasional free together or join clubs/societies.

5. Didn’t do these subjects but so you’ll have to take note from others.

6. In revision intensive times and generally if you want to do well go to the library! There’ll be some time to chill here and there too.
Thanks! would you say i need to bring a 'day folder' with me as well or is that too much?
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Little Popcorns
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(Original post by __itsme)
Thanks! would you say i need to bring a 'day folder' with me as well or is that too much?
Yep that’s what I meant by my answer in number 1
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saboor 123
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I am doing maths, further maths, physics and economics. How do i go on about it? Do I start now? I am doing my exams in 2019. I am starting sixth form now. I am 14 years old
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minivampire
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(Original post by __itsme)
I'm starting sixth form September 2018.Do any year 13's or uni students have any advice for me.I'm taking biology,chemistry,math and English lit (but i might drop it)
1. what should i bring to school?
2.how much revision should i do?
3.should i use PDF or paper textbooks?
4.how do i make friends in a new school?
5.tips for the subjects i've chosen?
6.how should i spend my free's?
I didn't take the same subjects as you, but my advise would be....
1. Take to school - pens, pencils, highlighters and coloured pens.
I don't know what your college is like but mine had a study room full of; lined paper, A4 paper for mindmaps, coloured paper, rulers, felt-tip pens, etc.
If yours doesn't have the same, bring some paper for revision purposes.
I also had a folder for each subject which I brought with me if I needed it that day.
- get some loose folder sheets (whatever they are called???) So if you are given any sheets you can keep them nice and clean in your bag (my friend learned this first hand when her hot chocolate leaked xD!)

2. How much revision? Everyone is different but the recommended amount of revision for one week is 15 to 20 hours.
Personally I took Saturdays off, that was my relax day to ensure I didn't turn out.
So Monday to Friday, I took my classes plus an additional three/four hours of revision. Sometimes more depending on free periods for that day.
On a Sunday I did two hours of revision for each subject, then briefly went over any notes ready for Monday's lesson/s.
You don't want to do TOO much or you might burn out, but go over notes enough to ensure you retain key aspects
When you have been taught everything, you'll get class times to revise too! I had three montha to revise my subjects because i learnt everything ahead of time!
When it came closer to the exams I upped the amount of revision. So I sacrificedmy relaxing Saturday to up revision times, and practice more exam questions

3. Personally found paper textbooks better.
But something I did was read my paper textbook at home, and at college I used a digital based one ----- so I didn't havr to carry textbooks everyday!

4. Making friends in a new school - this is always a anxious time for everyone! But honestly there is no method to making friends. In my classes I always sat at the back, and oftenly my teachers asked us to communicate witg the people on mh table.
Just be kind to everyone.
Talk about your subject and eventually the conversation will start to flow.

5. Sorry didn't take your subjects, I took;
Psychology - included parts of biology and small amount of maths
Sociology
Health and social

6. Frees; I divided my frees up.
Lets say you have 6 hours of frees a week.
I used 3 to sit in a coffee shop, snack, socialise, we compared homework.
Otger 3 - revise! Make summary notes of the topic, make flashcards, can you get ahead somehow? Make quizzes on kahoot and quizlet.

**I used this and achieved an A in health and social - not aure about the others yet!
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atlanticblue26
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(Original post by __itsme)
I'm starting sixth form September 2018.Do any year 13's or uni students have any advice for me.I'm taking biology,chemistry,math and English lit (but i might drop it)
1. what should i bring to school?
2.how much revision should i do?
3.should i use PDF or paper textbooks?
4.how do i make friends in a new school?
5.tips for the subjects i've chosen?
6.how should i spend my free's?
Just finished Year 13 doing chemistry, maths and biology.

Apart from the obvious like pens, bring whatever you need to keep everythig organised, especially if you're the type of person that likes looking back at their classwork. A good idea I saw people in my year did was taking one little folder to school every day and having big subject ones at home. Dividers also useful.

Revise every time you have an end of topic test or mock, leaving enough time. If there's something you don't understand in a lesson, follow up on it by revising or getting help.

I personally preferred paper textbooks because when I did final revision I could physically highlight. Obviously see what you like but textbooks are very useful to have with you in lessons, harder to do with a pdf. I don't know if the new maths A-Level has a good textbook (I was the last year on the old) but chemistry and biology ones were good. Too many words in the biology one maybe, not everything is important.

Science and maths are good subjects to work together on initially; you can start talking with that person that helped you with a problem before even asking a teacher, make friends that way. Talk to other people that are new, too.

Apart from getting help from people in the year that understand more than you, practice is the best thing. Sometimes in biology mainly the exam board want an answer that stays pretty much the same. Makes you better at handling weird questions, though save past papers. Also practice harder stuff than you need sometimes.

Split frees between working (homework, then eventually revision) and rest - not really realistic to work every single free.

Good luck and don't worry too much, sixth form goes really quickly. Final tip is treat end of topic exams and mocks really seriously as it makes life easier in the summer of Year 13 if you've revised everything a few times already.
Happy to help if you've got more questions.
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Mahree_Ah
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(Original post by __itsme)
I'm starting sixth form September 2018.Do any year 13's or uni students have any advice for me.I'm taking biology,chemistry,math and English lit (but i might drop it)
1. what should i bring to school?
2.how much revision should i do?
3.should i use PDF or paper textbooks?
4.how do i make friends in a new school?
5.tips for the subjects i've chosen?
6.how should i spend my free's?
Just finished AS, so I can only speak for first year.

1. A bare yet very important minimum: Pen, pencil, ruler, calculator, lined paper, somewhere to keep loose paper/printouts, like a folder or a file with plastic wallets. For your subjects, I would also recommend a maths set and highlights. Obviously, a bag to carry this all (you might also need a book bag to carry textbooks), your phone, purse/wallet and a set of headphones for when you need peace and quiet.

2. Depends on how you're finding your subjects and how you like to revise. I use around 12-20 hrs a week including homework, but I like making flashcards and posters. My friend only use practice papers and does no more than 3hrs a subject a week (she doesn't do her homework)

3. Online. I do French and I've found lots of PDFs for free online. I can imagine you can do the same for English. If you need a textbook, borrow one from school. The only books I recommend are revision/study guides which can you borrow off school or a mate and photocopy.

4. The first few weeks are the easiest, just talk to everyone, offer food and have lunch with some people. You'll find your niche. Might be a bit foreign, but also build good, friendly relationships with your teachers, tutors, staff members, cleaning staff, security guards etc. The perks are too real.

5. Biology is very very wordy and has the largest textbooks filled with unnecessary fluff. As you may have found with GCSE, it's very keyword based but it's also more logical than you would think. My advice is to learn and understand specific keywords (and the correct verb/adjectives to use with them) and apply them to make processes/explanations. The same can be said for Chemistry. Chemistry will have a lot more maths that you're probably used to so brush up on your basic arithmetic and FDPs.

6. 60% revising for subjects, 30% other academic/future based things (EPQ, Uni searches, work experience stuff etc.), 10% playing pc games, going shopping going home etc.
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ynlyndys
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Dated all my bits of work so it would be easier to file away in order and you know if you’re missing anything! That’s literally my biggest life regret as I go into y13.
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