Should the n word be said by teachers?

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filmaker
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Do you think that teachers are allowed to say the n word for educational purposes like when reading books such as to kill a mockingbird or when talking about the history of racism in america?
I bring this up because it's generally agreed on that only black people are allowed to say the n word but a couple years ago i studied to kill a mockingbird and my english teacher said it was okay to say it if youre quoting literature. Recently i studied heart of darkness and the teacher said the same thing.
What do you think? Should only the teachers be able to say it, everyone or nobody?
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TripleSlash
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I mean, in my opinion, if the person doesn't mean it as a slur, they can say it, as long as it is very clear that they don't mean to offend, and if all those around them are alright with it.
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999tigger
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(Original post by filmaker)
Do you think that teachers are allowed to say the n word for educational purposes like when reading books such as to kill a mockingbird or when talking about the history of racism in america?
I bring this up because it's generally agreed on that only black people are allowed to say the n word but a couple years ago i studied to kill a mockingbird and my english teacher said it was okay to say it if youre quoting literature. Recently i studied heart of darkness and the teacher said the same thing.
What do you think? Should only the teachers be able to say it, everyone or nobody?
No it isnt.

It is perfectly fine if it is in context and there is an educational reason for it.
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LeMan
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I don't really know, I feel like somebody of authority using the word without repercussions might have a knock-on effect and almost help to normalise the term in the eyes of the students. Then again more mature students should understand the negative connotations of the term, so I guess University-level and beyond it should be acceptable (?)
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UWS
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We studied that book and our teacher used it in an educational context (reading the book out loud). We had black guys in the classroom that didn't kick up a fuss.
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filmaker
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(Original post by UWS)
We studied that book and our teacher used it in an educational context (reading the book out loud). We had black guys in the classroom that didn't kick up a fuss.
Same, my class had quite a few black people, a white teacher said it and nobody cared.
But then the teacher started picking people to read and a white guy refused to say it even after the teacher said it was okay in that context.
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londonmyst
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No.
I don't think that word has any place in a civilised society.
It's extremely derogatory, with a vile historical association connected to lynchings and seems to generate a lot of distress amongst those who hear it.
When Diane Abbott read out hate messages she said she had received that included the N word, Good Morning Britain was inundated with complaints.

Everyone I know will only refer to "the N word", no matter what their race.
Within the black community there seems to be a lot of discussion about music including the word.
Older people seem upset that very young musicians are using it, the young musicians talk about reclaiming the word.
But a lot of people seem unhappy with hearing it used by anyone, in any context.


(Original post by filmaker)
Do you think that teachers are allowed to say the n word for educational purposes like when reading books such as to kill a mockingbird or when talking about the history of racism in america?
I bring this up because it's generally agreed on that only black people are allowed to say the n word but a couple years ago i studied to kill a mockingbird and my english teacher said it was okay to say it if youre quoting literature. Recently i studied heart of darkness and the teacher said the same thing.
What do you think? Should only the teachers be able to say it, everyone or nobody?
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filmaker
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(Original post by londonmyst)
No.
I don't think that word has any place in a civilised society.
It's extremely derogatory, with a vile historical association connected to lynchings and seems to generate a lot of distress amongst those who hear it.
When Diane Abbott read out hate messages she said she had received that included the N word, Good Morning Britain was inundated with complaints.

Everyone I know will only refer to "the N word", no matter what their race.
Within the black community there seems to be a lot of discussion about music including the word.
Older people seem upset that very young musicians are using it, the young musicians talk about reclaiming the word.
But a lot of people seem unhappy with hearing it used by anyone, in any context.
Playing devils advocate,
You cant ban a word because that just gives it so much power just how different cu*nt is from fu*ck, cu*nt is so much more offensive because not many people use it. And if its in literature and history surely ignoring it wont solve the problem
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londonmyst
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Not a legally binding ban restricting free speech or state censorship.
Just a social attitude that the n word is a tool for very unpleasant abuse and triumphalism that suits the KKK image, not that of civilised people in a multicultural society.

People are free to use it but if they do- don't expect their poor decision making to attract applause, make them any friends or be ignored on twitter.
Several hundred years ago, the word "papist" was used as a derogatory term for catholics, featuring in violent anti-catholic attacks and a high profile riot in 1780.
The word is included in 18th century legislation but is now associated with bigotry and trying to whip up anti-catholic hysteria.
A few trouble makers did shout it during violent episodes in northern ireland during the troubles.
But very few decent people fancy being tarred with that brush- whether atheist, protestant, catholic or any other religion.
As a result the word has almost disappeared from the modern vocabulary and is rarely encountered in popular culture.




(Original post by filmaker)
Playing devils advocate,
You cant ban a word because that just gives it so much power just how different cu*nt is from fu*ck, cu*nt is so much more offensive because not many people use it. And if its in literature and history surely ignoring it wont solve the problem
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ByEeek
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In the context of literature or general education then yes, it is perfectly acceptable to use the n-word. Thankfully we don't live in a world like Harry Potter where the unmentionable is known as He-who-shall-not-be-named. I find the whole n-word debate rather unsettling. The idea that it is ok for blacks to use it but not whites is a prime example of reverse snobbery that helps no one.
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xoxAngel_Kxox
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If it's in a book that you are studying, and it is said in the context of the book alone, it is fine.

I hate that there is almost terror of using a word - even when we need to!
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0lut0
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I just think it's too much hassle in a classroom you've got kids who aren't all that mature so it just brings unnecessary attention I would say if it's like a university lecture then they should fully say it but in schools, no.
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