Why pursuing a career in Law is (for the most part) pointless. Watch

username4102858
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 11 months ago
#1
After completing my studies a year ago with a 2:1 overall, the realities of this profession have set in.
I have spent a year working in two firms and I have discovered the following reoccurring traits within Law firms:

* Very high staff turnover
* Very low wages (£15,000-£17,000)
* Very slow career progression
* Long hours and high expectations

Law is a profession that is saturated with ambitions and intelligent graduates and firms are keen to exploit this and employ glorified call centre workers and\or administrators. Firms will often promise progression but this will either happen incredibly slowly or not at all.

I strongly urge those Law students not currently studying at a top University to reconsider another path.
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
4
reply
STw67
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#2
Report 11 months ago
#2
(Original post by Chillout18)
After completing my studies a year ago with a 2:1 overall, the realities of this profession have set in.
I have spent a year working in two firms and I have discovered the following reoccurring traits within Law firms:

* Very high staff turnover
* Very low wages (£15,000-£17,000)
* Very slow career progression
* Long hours and high expectations

Law is a profession that is saturated with ambitions and intelligent graduates and firms are keen to exploit this and employ glorified call centre workers and\or administrators. Firms will often promise progression but this will either happen incredibly slowly or not at all.

I strongly urge those Law students not currently studying at a top University to reconsider another path.
What University did you go to ?
0
reply
e^iπ
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#3
Report 11 months ago
#3
(Original post by Chillout18)
After completing my studies a year ago with a 2:1 overall, the realities of this profession have set in.
I have spent a year working in two firms and I have discovered the following reoccurring traits within Law firms:

* Very high staff turnover
* Very low wages (£15,000-£17,000)
* Very slow career progression
* Long hours and high expectations

Law is a profession that is saturated with ambitions and intelligent graduates and firms are keen to exploit this and employ glorified call centre workers and\or administrators. Firms will often promise progression but this will either happen incredibly slowly or not at all.

I strongly urge those Law students not currently studying at a top University to reconsider another path.
This is definitely true and only the people from top unis have any chance of getting what they want in law.

What uni did you go to btw?
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
STw67
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#4
Report 11 months ago
#4
(Original post by Chillout18)
After completing my studies a year ago with a 2:1 overall, the realities of this profession have set in.
I have spent a year working in two firms and I have discovered the following reoccurring traits within Law firms:

* Very high staff turnover
* Very low wages (£15,000-£17,000)
* Very slow career progression
* Long hours and high expectations

Law is a profession that is saturated with ambitions and intelligent graduates and firms are keen to exploit this and employ glorified call centre workers and\or administrators. Firms will often promise progression but this will either happen incredibly slowly or not at all.

I strongly urge those Law students not currently studying at a top University to reconsider another path.
FFS, i was thinking about being a solicitor when older, but I don't think i'm going to end up in a top uni because of my gcse's. Don't know what to do now, Law Seems grim
0
reply
username4102858
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 11 months ago
#5
I went to UCLAN. Not a terrible Uni but certainly not the best.

However, some of my colleagues over the past year have gone to superior institutions and were in a similar situation. For example, a girl I know has been doing the same role for two years, sometimes even taking the work laptop home at weekends and for minimum wage and zero progression.

These firms need administrators and getting ones with demonstrable cognitive ability (in the form of a Law Degree) is a bonus. They will often cleverly name the roles to entice people which is smart from a marketing perspective.

A firm contacted me the other day and offered me a job interview. The day consisted of an assessment centre, case study, written test and competency based interview. This was for £16,000 a year salary.

LOL
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
STw67
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#6
Report 11 months ago
#6
(Original post by Chillout18)
I went to UCLAN. Not a terrible Uni but certainly not the best.

However, some of my colleagues over the past year have gone to superior institutions and were in a similar situation. For example, a girl I know has been doing the same role for two years, sometimes even taking the work laptop home at weekends and for minimum wage and zero progression.

These firms need administrators and getting ones with demonstrable cognitive ability (in the form of a Law Degree) is a bonus. They will often cleverly name the roles to entice people which is smart from a marketing perspective.

A firm contacted me the other day and offered me a job interview. The day consisted of an assessment centre, case study, written test and competency based interview. This was for £16,000 a year salary.

LOL
How about if you want to become a solicitor, and don't end up in a top uni such as oxbridge, lse, kings, warwick, durham. ?
0
reply
Notoriety
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#7
Report 11 months ago
#7
2:1 from UCLan, what did you really expect? Types of firms you're dealing with like people from in-house, so they recruit internally for the TCs. Keep at it, secure promotions and you still might become someone you want to be.
0
reply
emmamariekitty
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#8
Report 11 months ago
#8
I'm confused with what you say by this. When you say you finished your studies a year ago does that literally just mean you finished your degree?
If you wanted to be a solicitor you have to do at least a training contract and a legal practice course which takes 3 years
If you wanted to be a barrister you then have to complete a bar professional training course which takes at least a year
How do you expect to be earning a lot of money when from what it sounds like you have just done your degree and don't have the other relevant qualifications?
1
reply
-Eirlys-
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#9
Report 11 months ago
#9
(Original post by emmamariekitty)
I'm confused with what you say by this. When you say you finished your studies a year ago does that literally just mean you finished your degree?
If you wanted to be a solicitor you have to do at least a training contract and a legal practice course which takes 3 years
If you wanted to be a barrister you then have to complete a bar professional training course which takes at least a year
How do you expect to be earning a lot of money when from what it sounds like you have just done your degree and don't have the other relevant qualifications?
You can also do an 18 month PGDip in law and you can then become a solicitor - it consolidates a three year law degree into 18 months.
0
reply
emmamariekitty
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#10
Report 11 months ago
#10
(Original post by hannxm)
You can also do an 18 month PGDip in law and you can then become a solicitor - it consolidates a three year law degree into 18 months.
Did this person do that? Surely a law firm would be more interested in someone who has done a two year contract because they already have two years of experience in a law firm?
0
reply
-Eirlys-
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#11
Report 11 months ago
#11
(Original post by emmamariekitty)
Did this person do that? Surely a law firm would be more interested in someone who has done a two year contract because they already have two years of experience in a law firm?
I was just stating another avenue into law. Experience in law or any type of work is beneficial.
1
reply
emmamariekitty
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#12
Report 11 months ago
#12
(Original post by STw67)
FFS, i was thinking about being a solicitor when older, but I don't think i'm going to end up in a top uni because of my gcse's. Don't know what to do now, Law Seems grim
I wouldn't be put off by this guy, in order to be a solicitor he would have to have done a legal practice course and a training contract which would take a least three years and it sounds like he only graduated a year ago so he clearly hasn't done that so he doesn't even have the right qualifications to become a solicitor which may be why he's not getting jobs and if he is they're low paying. You can't just jump out of law school and expect a job immediately there's more work you have to do before that.

Most universities don't look at your GCSE grades unless you're looking at like Oxbridge so you may still get into a top uni
1
reply
username4102858
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 11 months ago
#13
(Original post by Notoriety)
2:1 from UCLan, what did you really expect? Types of firms you're dealing with like people from in-house, so they recruit internally for the TCs. Keep at it, secure promotions and you still might become someone you want to be.
I did specify at the outset that I didn't go to a top University. Secondly, the firms that I have worked in actually recruited both internally and externally.

I should also add that the pay of training contracts at these firms was only £20,000. So, an education that costs circa £27,000 and takes a minimum of four years to complete alongside working for £17,000 for potentially years to then become a legal trainee earning £20,000, then once qualified you will earn circa £20,000-£30,000.

My point is that one could just go into Financial Services and earn £30,000 straight away or even go for a graduate scheme. Both options make much more sense.

Luckily, many corporations don't give a hoot about which University you went to unless you go to Oxbridge which will obviously impress them. The point of my thread isn't to moan, I just want people to really think about this from a logical perspective.
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
2
reply
Notoriety
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#14
Report 11 months ago
#14
(Original post by hannxm)
You can also do an 18 month PGDip in law and you can then become a solicitor - it consolidates a three year law degree into 18 months.
I am not sure what this PGDip is, but if it is replacing a three-year degree (normally people would take a GDL), then OP would still need to take the LPC or BPTC.
0
reply
Notoriety
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#15
Report 11 months ago
#15
(Original post by Chillout18)
I did specify at the outset that I didn't go to a top University. Secondly, the firms that I have worked in actually recruited both internally and externally.

I should also add that the pay of training contracts at these firms was only £20,000. So, an education that costs circa £27,000 and takes a minimum of four years to complete alongside working for £17,000 for potentially years to then become a legal trainee earning £20,000, then once qualified you will earn circa £20,000-£30,000.

My point is that one could just go into Financial Services and earn £30,000 straight away or even go for a graduate scheme. Both options make much more sense.

Luckily, many corporations don't give a hoot about which University you went to unless you go to Oxbridge which will obviously impress them. The point of my thread isn't to moan, I just want people to really think about this from a logical perspective.
They have a preference for in-house and getting on a grad scheme at the FSA is not easy for these Oxbridge grads, so not sure why you think that you and your 2:1 UCLan might get there.
1
reply
username4102858
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#16
Report Thread starter 11 months ago
#16
(Original post by STw67)
FFS, i was thinking about being a solicitor when older, but I don't think i'm going to end up in a top uni because of my gcse's. Don't know what to do now, Law Seems grim
If it is something that you truly want to do, go for it and don't be disheartened.
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
-Eirlys-
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#17
Report 11 months ago
#17
(Original post by Notoriety)
I am not sure what this PGDip is, but if it is replacing a three-year degree (normally people would take a GDL), then OP would still need to take the LPC or BPTC.
About PGDips and PGCerts. GDL is what I was referring to - it mentions it in the link and yes, you would need to do the LPC or BPTC.
0
reply
emmamariekitty
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#18
Report 11 months ago
#18
(Original post by Chillout18)
I did specify at the outset that I didn't go to a top University. Secondly, the firms that I have worked in actually recruited both internally and externally.

I should also add that the pay of training contracts at these firms was only £20,000. So, an education that costs circa £27,000 and takes a minimum of four years to complete alongside working for £17,000 for potentially years to then become a legal trainee earning £20,000, then once qualified you will earn circa £20,000-£30,000.

My point is that one could just go into Financial Services and earn £30,000 straight away or even go for a graduate scheme. Both options make much more sense.

Luckily, many corporations don't give a hoot about which University you went to unless you go to Oxbridge which will obviously impress them. The point of my thread isn't to moan, I just want people to really think about this from a logical perspective.

I'm not sure why you expect to get paid a lot on a training contract, you're still not fully qualified to practice law, they're training you, why would they pay you a lot?
"£17,000 for potentially years to then become a legal trainee earning £20,000" You can become a legal trainee right after your degree/LPC so why are you earning £17,000 for potentially years to then become a legal trainee?
May I ask what experience you have to put on your CV? Have you done any internships? Those are all things that help you get onto a training contract, if you haven't done them that's your downfall

It might make more sense to do something else but if your passion is law then why would you?
0
reply
emmamariekitty
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#19
Report 11 months ago
#19
I've spoken to law firms who have told me that a degree is a degree and they don't care about where you get it from as long as you have a 2:1 or above. It just depends on the law firm you apply to
0
reply
CityTCwannabe
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#20
Report 11 months ago
#20
(Original post by emmamariekitty)
I'm not sure why you expect to get paid a lot on a training contract, you're still not fully qualified to practice law, they're training you, why would they pay you a lot?
"£17,000 for potentially years to then become a legal trainee earning £20,000" You can become a legal trainee right after your degree/LPC so why are you earning £17,000 for potentially years to then become a legal trainee?
May I ask what experience you have to put on your CV? Have you done any internships? Those are all things that help you get onto a training contract, if you haven't done them that's your downfall

It might make more sense to do something else but if your passion is law then why would you?
Lots of training contracts in the City are very well paid. You work very hard for your money, but they are well paid.

You might have to work 'for years' for less money though as TCs are super competitive and lots of people are unsuccessful so it takes a few rounds(years) of applications to secure one, particularly if you're applying to City/Magic Circle/American firms.
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Are you tempted to change your firm university choice on A-level results day?

Yes, I'll try and go to a uni higher up the league tables (152)
17.86%
Yes, there is a uni that I prefer and I'll fit in better (75)
8.81%
No I am happy with my course choice (503)
59.11%
I'm using Clearing when I have my exam results (121)
14.22%

Watched Threads

View All