username4181196
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Hi I am currently doing diagnostic radiography bsc where I have become very interested in physics. I haven't got a physics A level but have been studying in my own time just out of curiosity. From this I have been very interested in aerospace engineering and would like to do a masters in it. However as my degree in radiotherapy has very little relation to engineering I would do experience, research and internships beforehand. But is that good enough for a job? Im assuming they would want someone with a degree in engineering and then a masters but I am really determined to study hard and educate myself enough in the little time that I have.

Any other options you think I can do?

Thanks in advance.
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Smack
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(Original post by uksurfernet)
Hi I am currently doing radiotherapy and oncology BSc where I have become very interested in physics. I haven't got a physics A level but have been studying in my own time just out of curiosity. From this I have been very interested in aerospace engineering and would like to do a masters in it. However as my degree in radiotherapy has very little relation to engineering I would do experience, research and internships beforehand. But is that good enough for a job? Im assuming they would want someone with a degree in engineering and then a masters but I am really determined to study hard and educate myself enough in the little time that I have.

Any other options you think I can do?

Thanks in advance.
Are there MSc degrees that accept a radiography degree for entry?
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username4181196
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(Original post by Smack)
Are there MSc degrees that accept a radiography degree for entry?
Im not completely sure yet I would have to try at the universities who care more about interviewing, experience and linking my physics modules to engineering. I would like to try and prove to them I am able by taking up a lot of extra work as most universities say they will accept applicants with different degrees as long as they having something to show for because I really like physics. Unfortunately I didnt find many career options in physics that I was interested in except medical physics which links directly to my degree.
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Adridk
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Have you ever done mechanics of materials, material science, thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, heat transfer?
I find it hard to believe that you will be able get into a MSc in aerospace engineering.
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(Original post by Adridk)
Have you ever done mechanics of materials, material science, thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, heat transfer?
I find it hard to believe that you will be able get into a MSc in aerospace engineering.
Yes I have started studying about them now in my own time I have about 2 years before I will think apply so I think that is enough time to learn as much as I can even if I dont get in I will still try.
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I don't doubt that you have the capability to learn. But a university will ask you for a relevant bachelor degree, without that it will be very difficult. Have you done any CAD or FEM?
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(Original post by Adridk)
I don't doubt that you have the capability to learn. But a university will ask you for a relevant bachelor degree, without that it will be very difficult. Have you done any CAD or FEM?
I want to apply for CAD but im really starting to have second thoughts now if I put in all this effort and its not worth because no where will accept me. You are very right I need to have more to show for myself but if I really want to pursue it I will apply for CAD and then an online FEM course afterwards. Thanks a lot for your help.
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You can learn CAD on YouTube, that's what most people do. You should try to get a bachelor degree in mechanical engineering, mechatronics or aerospace. But be sure it is what you want, I did mechanical engineering but I am now switching to software development. This field is very related to mechanical design, coming up with loads and then finding materials that can hold up maximum loads a d fatigue (there's much more than this, I am just trying to give an overview), be sure that's what you want. If it is you can persue, for example, mechanical engineering in another country where you don't have to pay for tuition, try Denmark or Sweden.
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(Original post by Adridk)
You can learn CAD on YouTube, that's what most people do. You should try to get a bachelor degree in mechanical engineering, mechatronics or aerospace. But be sure it is what you want, I did mechanical engineering but I am now switching to software development. This field is very related to mechanical design, coming up with loads and then finding materials that can hold up maximum loads a d fatigue (there's much more than this, I am just trying to give an overview), be sure that's what you want. If it is you can persue, for example, mechanical engineering in another country where you don't have to pay for tuition, try Denmark or Sweden.
Thats great thanks I will do more research before making any major decisions. I see have you graduated or are you still in uni?
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I graduated from a danish university in January. By the 3rd year I realised that I enjoy more programming and found a conversion master for software development in the UK. I will start it in September.
What makes you like aerospace engineering?
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Smack
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(Original post by uksurfernet)
Im not completely sure yet I would have to try at the universities who care more about interviewing, experience and linking my physics modules to engineering. I would like to try and prove to them I am able by taking up a lot of extra work as most universities say they will accept applicants with different degrees as long as they having something to show for because I really like physics. Unfortunately I didnt find many career options in physics that I was interested in except medical physics which links directly to my degree.
I would firstly ensure that there are MSc degrees that will accept you with your current background. If not, you may have to do an engineering undergrad degree.

What is it that you are looking for in a job?
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(Original post by Adridk)
I graduated from a danish university in January. By the 3rd year I realised that I enjoy more programming and found a conversion master for software development in the UK. I will start it in September.
What makes you like aerospace engineering?
That’s awesome never thought about uni abroad but it sounds like a good idea especially because uni in the UK is so expensive. I like it because of I enjoy learning about aerodynamics and how crafts interact in the air/space backed by mathematics.
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exam freak
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As an Engineering grad, No is the answer. But you could transfer to a foundation year which automatically progresses onto an integrated MEng in aeronautical, thus solving the lack of related A level problem. Its going to take a while but if you really want to do it, its worth it, you are most likely still young and our generation will be working till we die these days. So go for it. I can personally recommend the Engineering foundation year at Nottingham, I did it. Graduated with a 2:1 in Chem eng despite not having any related A levels.
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If aerodynamics is your interest, you should bet in fluid mechanics and then proceed to CFD(Computational fluid dynamics). This assumes previous knowledge in mechanics and and classical physics.
If you took physics and maths in years 12/13 it should be enough for universities in Denmark. Not sure how it will work in the UK. But as exam freak mentioned, a foundation year would take care of that problem.
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(Original post by Adridk)
If aerodynamics is your interest, you should bet in fluid mechanics and then proceed to CFD(Computational fluid dynamics). This assumes previous knowledge in mechanics and and classical physics.
If you took physics and maths in years 12/13 it should be enough for universities in Denmark. Not sure how it will work in the UK. But as exam freak mentioned, a foundation year would take care of that problem.
They won't get full student finance for an engineering undergraduate course, nevermind a foundation year, as they are already doing a BSc.

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exam freak
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yes they will if they give up before they graduate and make a course transfer. Also foundation years are considered part of the degree and therefore is also guaranteed finance.
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Doones
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(Original post by exam freak)
yes they will if they give up before they graduate and make a course transfer. Also foundation years are considered part of the degree and therefore is also guaranteed finance.
No. Prior years of a degree course reduce the eligibility for finance. If they have been on their current course for more than a year they will have to pay towards the extra years study.




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exam freak
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[QUOTE=Doonesbury;78993612]No. Prior years of a degree course reduce the eligibility for finance. If they have been on their current course for more than a year they will have to pay towards the extra years study.

This has changed recently then, my friend did physics for 2 years then switched to PPE for another 3 all was covered fully.
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(Original post by exam freak)
Prior years of a degree course reduce the eligibility for finance. If they have been on their current course for more than a year they will have to pay towards the extra years study.

This has changed recently then, my friend did physics for 2 years then switched to PPE for another 3 all was covered fully.
It's been this way for quite a while.

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exam freak
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
It's been this way for quite a while.

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Well my friend has just graduated so it must of been in the last 3 years.
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