Is an Oxbridge degree actually a disadvantage?

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e^iπ
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By this I mean if some employers are more biased against Oxbridge grads as they come across know-it-alls.

Also do Oxbridge grads expect more from a career than their RG uni counterparts and do these expectations get met?

It seems to me that Oxbridge is just 3 years of hard work for relatively little benefits.

What do you guys think?
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e^iπ
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Anyone who went to Oxbridge, your input would be appreciated.
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ruthf
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(Original post by e^iπ)
By this I mean if some employers are more biased against Oxbridge grads as they come across know-it-alls.

Also do Oxbridge grads expect more from a career than their RG uni counterparts and do these expectations get met?

It seems to me that Oxbridge is just 3 years of hard work for relatively little benefits.

What do you guys think?
I haven’t actually started my degree at Oxford but I’m (hopefully) going there for Law in October. I just want to say that for a legal career I think it is beneficial. One of the reasons I wanted to go to Oxbridge is because when you look at the most recent tenants at the top chambers in the country, particularly in London and the South where I have grown up, they almost always have a degree from Oxbridge.
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e^iπ
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(Original post by ruthflame57)
I haven’t actually started my degree at Oxford but I’m (hopefully) going there for Law in October. I just want to say that for a legal career I think it is beneficial. One of the reasons I wanted to go to Oxbridge is because when you look at the most recent tenants at the top chambers in the country, particularly in London and the South where I have grown up, they almost always have a degree from Oxbridge.
It would be very helpful when your employers are made up of mostly Oxbridge grads but for other sectors would it be a disadvantage because more is expected from you?
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yt7777
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(Original post by e^iπ)
By this I mean if some employers are more biased against Oxbridge grads as they come across know-it-alls.

Also do Oxbridge grads expect more from a career than their RG uni counterparts and do these expectations get met?

It seems to me that Oxbridge is just 3 years of hard work for relatively little benefits.

What do you guys think?
Any employer who generalises like this isn't worth working for anyway
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rhaegar458
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A degree from Oxbridge gives you a sizeable advantage for elite careers if you are capable of fully leveraging it.

Also "RG counterparts"? Lol, outside of maybe a few of the RGs, Oxbridge is far superior to the rest of RG.
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ruthf
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(Original post by e^iπ)
It would be very helpful when your employers are made up of mostly Oxbridge grads but for other sectors would it be a disadvantage because more is expected from you?
It is difficult to say. Obviously both Oxford and Cambridge are fantastic universities but so are all of the RGs and other universities in their own individual specialities. I think at Oxbridge and the RGs the connections are what makes a lot of it, particularly at Oxbridge, and that can be really helpful. I wouldn’t necessarily say that more is expected from you because if you get a first class degree you’ve obviously proven yourself. If you got a pass degree, even at Oxbridge, I doubt you’d have as much success as someone with a first class from a RG or another university.
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e^iπ
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(Original post by yt7777)
Any employer who generalises like this isn't worth working for anyway
True.

But it seems that for a significant portion of the Oxbridge student body, their priorities lie in academia so this might impact in their soft skills. (especially true for stem subject)

I suppose the crux of my original question is whether striving so hard to get into Oxbridge has any benefitd as it seems that you can get into most jobs these days as long as your degree is from a respectable university.

Oxbridge just seems like they make the courses hard for the sake of it.
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Beth_H
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It can be an advantage, because no employer is ever going to question the academic integrity of an Oxbridge degree (not that I think many employers ask this question of other unis, but it's difficult to know). However, it can be disadvantageous because the heavy workload and focus on academic success means that - from my experience so far - less time is devoted to developing other skills that improve employability (like CV writing and interview preparation) than it might be elsewhere.
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yt7777
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(Original post by e^iπ)
True.

But it seems that for a significant portion of the Oxbridge student body, their priorities lie in academia so this might impact in their soft skills. (especially true for stem subject)

I suppose the crux of my original question is whether striving so hard to get into Oxbridge has any benefitd as it seems that you can get into most jobs these days as long as your degree is from a respectable university.

Oxbridge just seems like they make the courses hard for the sake of it.
My point of view is, and this applies to anyone considering university, that you should push yourself to got to the best institution possible as you'll be challenged according to your ability. If you genuinely are passionate about the subject you study why wouldn't you want the best education, albeit being more effort. There are so many poor universities out there now (I originally applied to some of these) I couldn't think of anything worse than going somewhere that didn't challenge me. I didnt go to Oxbridge by the way (Attended: top 20 for BSc, top 10 for MSc - for CS).

In terms of jobs, I've heard it certainly helps with getting interviews and definitely stands out on your application. From there it depends on your skills an personality. But more than that, even the value for money. It costs the same to go to uni whether you go to Oxford or if you go to London Met, so surely you'd want to get the best degree for the same cost rather than compensate and go somewhere for an easier life?
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e^iπ
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(Original post by yt7777)
My point of view is, and this applies to anyone considering university, that you should push yourself to got to the best institution possible as you'll be challenged according to your ability. If you genuinely are passionate about the subject you study why wouldn't you want the best education, albeit being more effort. There are so many poor universities out there now (I originally applied to some of these) I couldn't think of anything worse than going somewhere that didn't challenge me. I didnt go to Oxbridge by the way (Attended: top 20 for BSc, top 10 for MSc - for CS).

In terms of jobs, I've heard it certainly helps with getting interviews and definitely stands out on your application. From there it depends on your skills an personality. But more than that, even the value for money. It costs the same to go to uni whether you go to Oxford or if you go to London Met, so surely you'd want to get the best degree for the same cost rather than compensate and go somewhere for an easier life?
Comoektly agree with you about the fact that the return from going to a university is linked to it's reputation and rigour.

Of course there many good unis like Warwick and UCL where although the course load is difficult, it's no where near that if Oxbridge. What I'm saying is Oxbridge seems to fall short of how much you get back in relation to how much work you put in compared to other unis.

And I suspect that many of the "Oxbridge only" companies only hire Oxbridge grads due to them having a shared experience of an increased workload as opposed to Oxbridge grads actually being better at the job.
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username3535256
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(Original post by e^iπ)
By this I mean if some employers are more biased against Oxbridge grads as they come across *know-it-alls*.

Also do Oxbridge grads expect more from a career than their RG uni counterparts and do these expectations get met?

It seems to me that Oxbridge is just 3 years of *hard work* for relatively little benefits.

What do you guys think?
From the first and third paragraphs, it seems like you’re tacitly admitting that Oxbridge graduates are the more knowledgable and skilled, and have received the better education... I rather think employees would be attracted to this. Also, it is common knowledge that Oxbridge is generally more academically challenging than other universities, and that employees recognise this.

I don’t really understand what makes you think that an Oxbridge degree would put you at a disadvantage...
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Beth_H
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(Original post by e^iπ)
It seems to me that Oxbridge is just 3 years of hard work for relatively little benefits.
You make it sound like hard work is a bad thing. People apply to Oxbridge *because* it's hard work - they want to spend three (or more) years in a stimulating and challenging environment, for the intellectual developments as much as any perceived employment advantage.
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e^iπ
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(Original post by Rachmaninov)
From the first and third paragraphs, it seems like you’re tacitly admitting that Oxbridge graduates are the more knowledgable and skilled, and have received the better education... I rather think employees would be attracted to this. Also, it is common knowledge that Oxbridge is generally more academically challenging than other universities, and that employees recognise this.

I don’t really understand what makes you think that an Oxbridge degree would put you at a disadvantage...
Yes there is no doubt that Oxbridge grads are more knowledgabkr and skilled, but I. their subject area.

Most employers don't care about how much you j WI about your degree course as the work environment is completely different to academia and qualities which would benefit you in the latter will not necessarily do so in the former.

I'm saying the disadvantaged comes I to paly when the students spend more time trying to get a 2:1 (challenging at Oxbridge) when they could have gotten a 1st at another top but not Oxbridge uni and developed soft skills and completed work experience
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e^iπ
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(Original post by Beth_H)
You make it sound like hard work is a bad thing. People apply to Oxbridge *because* it's hard work - they want to spend three (or more) years in a stimulating and challenging environment, for the intellectual developments as much as any perceived employment advantage.
You may think I'm cynical in saying this but a vast majority of Oxbridge applicant apply because Oxbridge is ranked highly and not because they want to work harder for the same thing.
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NamesAreEffort
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A 2:1 isn't any more challenging at Oxbridge. Oxbridge routinely get some of the highest % of 2:1s or 1sts in the country.

https://www.timeshighereducation.com...irsts-revealed

Both Oxford and Cambridge have comprehensive careers advice services' and there are more opportunities for placements, jobs, offers and so on than there are students because unsurprisingly, firms love Oxbridge grads.

Oxbridge students also take part in the same sorts of extracurriculars as you'd get at any university. The ability to balance workload with hobbies is one soft skill Oxbridge does better. Otherwise an Oxbridge education in no way disadvantages you as far as soft skills are concerned. The civil service is disproportionately Oxbridge, and their recruitment process is exclusively competence-based.

Yes, an Oxbridge education can easily be recreated at plenty of other universities, comparable to some of the other best universities, and much of the success of Oxbridge is down to selection bias. But the idea that going to Oxbridge is a disadvantage for the reasons you've given is just untrue.
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ThomH97
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Political parties won't choose you to lead them unless you've been to Oxbridge. That's why Labour tried to get rid of him for one of their Oxbridge candidates. You've got more chance of becoming Prime Minister if you didn't go to university than if you went to somewhere other than Oxbridge.

How's that for bias?
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username3535256
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(Original post by e^iπ)
Yes there is no doubt that Oxbridge grads are more knowledgabkr and skilled, but I. their subject area.

Most employers don't care about how much you j WI about your degree course as the work environment is completely different to academia and qualities which would benefit you in the latter will not necessarily do so in the former.

I'm saying the disadvantaged comes I to paly when the students spend more time trying to get a 2:1 (challenging at Oxbridge) when they could have got a 1st at another top but not Oxbridge uni and developed soft skills and completed work experience
NB: there are a couple of typos in here so I’m only getting the gist of what you’re saying...

From my point of view, I know that I want a career in music, and that I’m not going to get a better musical education anywhere than Oxford (or Cambridge, and discounting the conservatories). I would have thought it would also apply to other people who want a subject-specific career (although I know a lot of people don’t). And I know that if I get into Oxford I’ll be aiming for a first, not a 2i (or I’ll try, at the very least), and I think you can get summer internships whatever the uni.
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e^iπ
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(Original post by Rachmaninov)
NB: there are a couple of typos in here so I’m only getting the gist of what you’re saying...

From my point of view, I know that I want a career in music, and that I’m not going to get a better musical education anywhere than Oxford (or Cambridge, and discounting the conservatories). I would have thought it would also apply to other people who want a subject-specific career (although I know a lot of people don’t). And I know that if I get into Oxford I’ll be aiming for a first, not a 2i (or I’ll try, at the very least), and I think you can get summer internships whatever the uni.
Apologies for the typos and thanks for not dispelling my points on the basis of a few typos.

What I was saying is that the intensity of the workload at Cambridge might affect peoples ability to develop skills relevant to the workplace.

I guess what I'm trying to say is, what is the point of going above and beyond when applying for Cambridge only to work even harder their. I realise Cambridge has passionate people but you can find those in other unis as well.

A student once told me the workload at Cambridge is like memorising the first 100 digits of pi while the workload at other top unis is like using the pi button on a calculator. While the former is impressive it doesn't serve any more use than the latter
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The RAR
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(Original post by ThomH97)
Political parties won't choose you to lead them unless you've been to Oxbridge. That's why Labour tried to get rid of him for one of their Oxbridge candidates. You've got more chance of becoming Prime Minister if you didn't go to university than if you went to somewhere other than Oxbridge.

How's that for bias?
Are you telling me that you have to go to Oxbridge in order to lead either the Conservatives or Labour? That is just straight up stupid if it's actually true, what is it with this University prestige these days? You should be judged as an individual, not of the uni you have been to.
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