Maths or Maths and Physics? Watch

thenbhd
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 7 months ago
#1
Needed some help deciding on whether to do a straight Maths degree or Maths and Physics degree

I really enjoy Physics lessons and find different areas very interesting (especially particle physics ) and I do well in exams. However I'm a lot less confident in myself when it comes to Physics - I never come out of an exam 100% confident I've got good marks.

Maths I also find really interesting - i enjoy the 'pure' stuff at a level but ik that pure stuff at uni is proofs etc. which I don't find particularly interesting. the applied modules in maths are much more appealing to me and I definitely want to do as much applied maths at uni as possible.

Im trying to find a compromise between the two subjects. Are there any degrees that are straight maths that involve a lot of applied maths and some physics modules that you can recommend? / good joint degrees that still have a fair bit of maths in but also physics?

thanks in advance
1
reply
kkboyk
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#2
Report 7 months ago
#2
(Original post by thenbhd)
Needed some help deciding on whether to do a straight Maths degree or Maths and Physics degree

I really enjoy Physics lessons and find different areas very interesting (especially particle physics ) and I do well in exams. However I'm a lot less confident in myself when it comes to Physics - I never come out of an exam 100% confident I've got good marks.

Maths I also find really interesting - i enjoy the 'pure' stuff at a level but ik that pure stuff at uni is proofs etc. which I don't find particularly interesting. the applied modules in maths are much more appealing to me and I definitely want to do as much applied maths at uni as possible.

Im trying to find a compromise between the two subjects. Are there any degrees that are straight maths that involve a lot of applied maths and some physics modules that you can recommend? / good joint degrees that still have a fair bit of maths in but also physics?

thanks in advance
At many universities (e.g. Heriot-Watt, Baths, Cardiff) for a straight Maths degree you'll get the chance to choose optional modules related to Physics during your second and third year, as well other applied areas such as Stats and Computational Maths. However if you're dead set that you want to learn more theoretical and practical topics in Physics then I'd recommend doing the joint honours, which you get to do more advanced modules you wouldn't do in a straight Maths degree.

Proofs is something you'd stumble in any Maths related topic (yes this includes applied stuff), and its very crucial to understand them. Mainly because we need proofs in Math, first, because we want to be sure that what we are doing is correct.

In terms of career prospect, neither has an advantage over the other. It's a matter of personal preference.
0
reply
thenbhd
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 7 months ago
#3
(Original post by kkboyk)
At many universities (e.g. Heriot-Watt, Baths, Cardiff) for a straight Maths degree you'll get the chance to choose optional modules related to Physics during your second and third year, as well other applied areas such as Stats and Computational Maths. However if you're dead set that you want to learn more theoretical and practical topics in Physics then I'd recommend doing the joint honours, which you get to do more advanced modules you wouldn't do in a straight Maths degree.

Proofs is something you'd stumble in any Maths related topic (yes this includes applied stuff), and its very crucial to understand them. Mainly because we need proofs in Math, first, because we want to be sure that what we are doing is correct.

In terms of career prospect, neither has an advantage over the other. It's a matter of personal preference.
thank you for this!
0
reply
exam freak
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#4
Report 7 months ago
#4
Honestly Physics at degree level is much more Mathsy and nothing like A level. Physics degree is probably more similar to A level maths and further maths than it is to Physics A level.
1
reply
thenbhd
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 7 months ago
#5
(Original post by exam freak)
Honestly Physics at degree level is much more Mathsy and nothing like A level. Physics degree is probably more similar to A level maths and further maths than it is to Physics A level.
That's kind of what I'm after! I want to kind of combine the harder maths with the physics concepts. Do you do Physics at university and if so can you tell me a bit more about it ? thanks in advance!
0
reply
exam freak
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#6
Report 7 months ago
#6
I did Chem eng. I'm all graduated now. But I knew lots of Physicists. It sounds like Physics at top uni's would very much suit you.
0
reply
Ljg2015
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#7
Report 7 months ago
#7
(Original post by thenbhd)
That's kind of what I'm after! I want to kind of combine the harder maths with the physics concepts. Do you do Physics at university and if so can you tell me a bit more about it ? thanks in advance!
I'm going into my second year of physics at York. If you're looking for a completely mathsy degree with some emphasis on physics, then a Maths and Physics degree is what you're looking for. If you take straight physics you'll still have the maths there but you'll go through it at a slower pace because you have labs too. Pure maths is, from what I've seen, just an abstract physics degree. So it depends what you're after. I'd personally say Maths and Physics is the more desirable degree to employers but obviously that's a subjective viewpoint
0
reply
username4136150
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#8
Report 7 months ago
#8
(Original post by thenbhd)
Needed some help deciding on whether to do a straight Maths degree or Maths and Physics degree

I really enjoy Physics lessons and find different areas very interesting (especially particle physics ) and I do well in exams. However I'm a lot less confident in myself when it comes to Physics - I never come out of an exam 100% confident I've got good marks.

Maths I also find really interesting - i enjoy the 'pure' stuff at a level but ik that pure stuff at uni is proofs etc. which I don't find particularly interesting. the applied modules in maths are much more appealing to me and I definitely want to do as much applied maths at uni as possible.

Im trying to find a compromise between the two subjects. Are there any degrees that are straight maths that involve a lot of applied maths and some physics modules that you can recommend? / good joint degrees that still have a fair bit of maths in but also physics?

thanks in advance
If by Physics you man Theoretical Physics you are much better off with Mathematics. Those who do Physics usually have more preparatory reading to do than those who do Mathematics.
0
reply
alevelphysicist
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#9
Report 7 months ago
#9
(Original post by thenbhd)
Needed some help deciding on whether to do a straight Maths degree or Maths and Physics degree

I really enjoy Physics lessons and find different areas very interesting (especially particle physics ) and I do well in exams. However I'm a lot less confident in myself when it comes to Physics - I never come out of an exam 100% confident I've got good marks.

Maths I also find really interesting - i enjoy the 'pure' stuff at a level but ik that pure stuff at uni is proofs etc. which I don't find particularly interesting. the applied modules in maths are much more appealing to me and I definitely want to do as much applied maths at uni as possible.

Im trying to find a compromise between the two subjects. Are there any degrees that are straight maths that involve a lot of applied maths and some physics modules that you can recommend? / good joint degrees that still have a fair bit of maths in but also physics?

thanks in advance
The entrance for straight maths tends to be higher than for maths and physics. Also you can transfer to straight maths or straight physics on come maths and physics courses.

Courses like maths and physics at Warwick and Durham (called natural sciences) seem very good courses without incredibly high entry requirements.
0
reply
eav_3508
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#10
Report 7 months ago
#10
(Original post by thenbhd)
Needed some help deciding on whether to do a straight Maths degree or Maths and Physics degree

I really enjoy Physics lessons and find different areas very interesting (especially particle physics ) and I do well in exams. However I'm a lot less confident in myself when it comes to Physics - I never come out of an exam 100% confident I've got good marks.

Maths I also find really interesting - i enjoy the 'pure' stuff at a level but ik that pure stuff at uni is proofs etc. which I don't find particularly interesting. the applied modules in maths are much more appealing to me and I definitely want to do as much applied maths at uni as possible.

Im trying to find a compromise between the two subjects. Are there any degrees that are straight maths that involve a lot of applied maths and some physics modules that you can recommend? / good joint degrees that still have a fair bit of maths in but also physics?

thanks in advance
I know that Birmingham does a theoretical physics and applied maths course which seems like it could be what you’re after, and it seems from the modules on the website that it’s more heavily weighted towards the applied maths side. I imagine there are lots of other unis that do similar things so the best thing you could do would probably be to look on the UCAS website or Which or something to find courses you might be interested in and then look more closely at the individual modules to see which type of degree (single or joint honours) seems to fit the bill best.
Good luck whatever you decide 😊
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
exam freak
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#11
Report 7 months ago
#11
Honestly everything said here is irrelevent. It all comes down to your optional modules. If you have good A levels once you are there a physics degree which is pretty much 80% Maths and 20% qualatative mathmatical related explanations of mathmatical related theories you will be able to change between all Maths, Physics, Theoretical physics, Maths with physics, physics with maths. You get the grades and you start they'll let you change.
0
reply
Heriot-Watt University - Student Rep
  •  Official Rep
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#12
Report 7 months ago
#12
(Original post by thenbhd)
Needed some help deciding on whether to do a straight Maths degree or Maths and Physics degree

I really enjoy Physics lessons and find different areas very interesting (especially particle physics ) and I do well in exams. However I'm a lot less confident in myself when it comes to Physics - I never come out of an exam 100% confident I've got good marks.

Maths I also find really interesting - i enjoy the 'pure' stuff at a level but ik that pure stuff at uni is proofs etc. which I don't find particularly interesting. the applied modules in maths are much more appealing to me and I definitely want to do as much applied maths at uni as possible.

Im trying to find a compromise between the two subjects. Are there any degrees that are straight maths that involve a lot of applied maths and some physics modules that you can recommend? / good joint degrees that still have a fair bit of maths in but also physics?

thanks in advance
Hi Thenbhd!

Whilst I understand that many universities (including ourselves) offer joint degrees of Maths and Physics, an interesting course I can recommend for somebody with an interest like yours is Mathematical Physics (MPhys). This is an integrated masters degree, meaning that you start off as an undergraduate and then leave the university with a post graduate degree. Not only is the course accredited with the Institute of Physics (IOP), it also offers the benefits of a joint degree (studying maths separately to physics) as well as the insight and knowledge with linking two courses into one. All our physics programmes also come with industrial experience, meaning you will leave us with both a masters degree and excellent industry experience (either in the UK or abroad depending on whichever you prefer).

More information on the course can be found below:
https://www.hw.ac.uk/study/uk/underg...sics-mphys.htm

I hope I helped!

Shaima
0
reply
alevelphysicist
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#13
Report 7 months ago
#13
At unis such as Durham you can take maths and physics then after first year transfer to single honours maths if you want.
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Cardiff University
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Wed, 27 Mar '19
  • University of Portsmouth
    Postgraduate and Part-Time Open Evenings Postgraduate
    Wed, 27 Mar '19
  • Middlesex University London
    Postgraduate Open Evening Postgraduate
    Wed, 27 Mar '19

How old were you when you first saw porn?

I've never seen it (123)
20.95%
Before I was 12 (201)
34.24%
13 (91)
15.5%
14 (71)
12.1%
15 (40)
6.81%
16 (17)
2.9%
17 (6)
1.02%
18 (5)
0.85%
Between the ages of 19 - 24 (8)
1.36%
Over 25 (1)
0.17%
12 (24)
4.09%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise