username3885888
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
Recently, I lost some BTEC sport work, In the isolation room, and got caught and sentenced to 2 weeks of isolation. However, when I broke a rule (by taking of my shoes, which were really painful) I got another two weeks. So I was asking whether the rules which you will read are fair and justified?
The booths/cell:
1. Around 30 of the cells/booths
2. A desk with high floor to ceiling walls going back 2.5 metres, with a piece of wood covering the legs and feet
The rules:
1. No talking or other communication with other students
2. No turning around, or looking around the room or the cell
3. No electronic equipment all to be given to the member of staff
4. No bags or other such objects In the cell, to be left in front.
5. Continuous work, or silently face the wall opposite for a period then another choice
6. Full school uniform at all times ( here in my cell I removed my shoes, and had plain white socks to a full black uniform, so I got 2 extra weeks, of isolation for that)
7.Each day of isolation has a detention
8. You report to isolation at 08:30 and finish at 4:30
9. Only a cold school meal, and no own snacks or similar.
10. Breaking this had more isolation,
So now o ask you, is this just my school or common?
0
reply
Hideyourfires
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
We had similar rules at my school apart from if you had a hot/school dinner you would have to eat it at the end of lunch with the head teacher.
0
reply
haseebj49
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 years ago
#3
(Original post by NapIngton)
sentenced to 2 weeks of isolation
Sentenced to time in prison more like... that's so harsh!
(Always been a good kid so can't relate much to the rules 😇)
2
reply
Purmerend
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
Fairly common. I've worked in a school with a similar setup to this.

The rules are fair and justified as schools are required to maintain order and good discipline. Punishing students harshly for continued breach of rules is fair as the consequences must become more severe. If you've put yourself in a position to be removed from all lessons then the above rules are the consequence.

I don't agree with the length of isolation - that is unjustified and arguably is depriving you of a decent education as you are essentially teaching yourself.
I don't agree with a detention for each day of isolation either. You are already being punished enough.

Unfortunately, the school is unlikely to change their behaviour policy - probably implemented in this form after a spell of serious bad behaviour in the past.
1
reply
Kian Stevens
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
Meh, being in isolation at my school never meant we had to eat cold dinners. It never meant we had detention everyday either. I guess schools have different 'additional' rules.

However, the general rules of isolation are that you're there all day, by yourself, in silence, either doing work or doing nothing at all. No ifs, no buts. Harsh, but discipline is discipline, and I guess it has to be done - don't do stupid things and you won't find yourself in isolation.
0
reply
katf
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#6
Report 2 years ago
#6
Ridiculously strict. I had countless days in isolation, but even I never had a month solid. Mind you I was also a kid with a lot of problems and punishment isn't the way to solve it. I've worked as a teaching assistant, never had to raise my voice to a kid. I find draconian discipline to be detrimental to behaviour, particularly when kids struggle to cope already. Kids with autism, for example are more than twice as likely to be permanently excluded as neurotypical children. That indicates a systemic problem within schools. The way to gain respect is by showing it to the kids. Encouragement and gentle correction will get better results than locking a kid up for a month. That doesn't teach anything. Some kids (me) when faced with constant punishment say f it and cause chaos for the sake of it. If you're constantly being punished when you do try, why bother putting in any effort? I have seen kids like this. Being the first adult to put faith in them can turn that kid around.
0
reply
username3885888
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#7
(Original post by Kian Stevens)
Meh, being in isolation at my school never meant we had to eat cold dinners. It never meant we had detention everyday either. I guess schools have different 'additional' rules.

However, the general rules of isolation are that you're there all day, by yourself, in silence, either doing work or doing nothing at all. No ifs, no buts. Harsh, but discipline is discipline, and I guess it has to be done - don't do stupid things and you won't find yourself in isolation.
I agree, but it was quite harsh, and at least o learned a lesson. But still, I felt so stupid for getting another two weeks for removing my shoes in a closed off, hidden. Part of the booth.
0
reply
username3885888
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#8
(Original post by Purmerend)
Fairly common. I've worked in a school with a similar setup to this.

The rules are fair and justified as schools are required to maintain order and good discipline. Punishing students harshly for continued breach of rules is fair as the consequences must become more severe. If you've put yourself in a position to be removed from all lessons then the above rules are the consequence.

I don't agree with the length of isolation - that is unjustified and arguably is depriving you of a decent education as you are essentially teaching yourself.
I don't agree with a detention for each day of isolation either. You are already being punished enough.

Unfortunately, the school is unlikely to change their behaviour policy - probably implemented in this form after a spell of serious bad behaviour in the past.
I agree that the first two weeks were justified, as I did enter the room, to my booth where I did lunch work, without permission. However, two extra weeks for removing footwear where it was no seen? It was a bit too hsrsh, but I learned, and now moved on.
0
reply
Kian Stevens
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#9
Report 2 years ago
#9
(Original post by NapIngton)
I agree, but it was quite harsh, and at least o learned a lesson. But still, I felt so stupid for getting another two weeks for removing my shoes in a closed off, hidden. Part of the booth.
I do admit that being in more hot water just for taking off your shoes is quite harsh. I suppose you do have to be in uniform, but surely the teacher supervising the isolation could've just told you to put them back on or something, and you could've explained why you took them off in the first place.

I got put in isolation some years ago for 'accidentally' Cantona kicking a dinnerlady... Only got put in once, and would never wish to be put in again
0
reply
izzyr162
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#10
Report 2 years ago
#10
At my school there’s a separate room with floor to ceiling barriers where you do work all day and have all your free time taken away like lunch and break and have supervised lunches so you basically spend your whole lunch with a teacher and you can’t see your own friends. My schools policy doesn’t sound half as bad as yours
0
reply
username3885888
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#11
(Original post by izzyr162)
At my school there’s a separate room with floor to ceiling barriers where you do work all day and have all your free time taken away like lunch and break and have supervised lunches so you basically spend your whole lunch with a teacher and you can’t see your own friends. My schools policy doesn’t sound half as bad as yours
So a simmilar fundamental part, but different advanced rules
0
reply
username3885888
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#12
Also forgot that as an prefect, I had to hand in all of my school access keys and key cards. So I had no rights. Oh and there was a huge list of every day and cell and activity and all day. So a advanced prison. And also fogot, if you wanted to go to toilet with footwear you could wear orange flip flops which they kept, but I would rather not
0
reply
username3885888
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#13
FFinal thing which I forgot, if you misbwmehaved you would get fixed termed, and you isolation term would start again. For your uniform, if you got a major infraction in or out of Isolation, you would go to isolation and get a plain black jumpsuit. Now I am not kidding you. Same if you got wrong shoes, you got isolation and still remove them, but you get given black slip on shoes. So I once came in Sri g uniform(thought it was non-uniform, a stupid prank) and I had to wear all of that. Also as I came in ankle socks, I would have been made to wear plain black, but as I was in isolation they gave me plain white. That is what happens for wrong uniform.
0
reply
MadamePompadour
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#14
Report 2 years ago
#14
Is isolation after you have already had repeated warnings about behaviour or is it the default? If its default then thats harsh but I would assume that the punishment is mean as a deterant so 1 period of being in isolation will be enough for most students to sort themselves out. How many students manage to not get in isolation? If its the majority of them then you really need to have a look at yourself and what you are doing at school to draw attention to yourself. If most students will spend some time in isolation then you can argue its the schools policies that need looking at and perhaps rewriting.
0
reply
katf
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#15
Report 2 years ago
#15
(Original post by MadamePompadour)
Is isolation after you have already had repeated warnings about behaviour or is it the default? If its default then thats harsh but I would assume that the punishment is mean as a deterant so 1 period of being in isolation will be enough for most students to sort themselves out. How many students manage to not get in isolation? If its the majority of them then you really need to have a look at yourself and what you are doing at school to draw attention to yourself. If most students will spend some time in isolation then you can argue its the schools policies that need looking at and perhaps rewriting.
The trouble is isolation doesn't work to change behaviour. The kids who tend to be disruptive usually end up viewing isolation as a badge of honour. And kids with learning difficulties who end up in there usually view it as punishment for being different.

Kids should only be out of class if being there is disrupting others learning. Isolation for wearing the wrong shoes or socks isn't going to help. It just stresses kids out.

If a kid can't cope in the classroom, then support should be given to address the issue. If a kid can cope, then a punishment that fits the crime should be given. Something like writing an essay on what they've done wrong and why it was wrong.
1
reply
username3885888
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#16
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#16
(Original post by MadamePompadour)
Is isolation after you have already had repeated warnings about behaviour or is it the default? If its default then thats harsh but I would assume that the punishment is mean as a deterant so 1 period of being in isolation will be enough for most students to sort themselves out. How many students manage to not get in isolation? If its the majority of them then you really need to have a look at yourself and what you are doing at school to draw attention to yourself. If most students will spend some time in isolation then you can argue its the schools policies that need looking at and perhaps rewriting.
I'm in a very small school, around 400 pupils, and most 80percent have been to isolation. I was simply there for tribal reasons, and if you read the reason for the original verdict at the top, well. Also, my school got you for real minor things, and any repeat offence was a day or 2 in isolation. So it was a common thing st my school. In fact I only really got it on year 11. With the stress and panic of GCSE
0
reply
Humayraax
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#17
Report 1 year ago
#17
I got put in isolation today and our schools rules for bags and phones are the same and you can't look around but we don't get detentions everyday of iso we don't have hot meals either and I'm worried cuz I'm.in nthere tomorrow and it's Friday which is fish and hips and I'm Muslim and the only sandwiches they have are ham.

(Original post by username3885888)
Recently, I lost some BTEC sport work, In the isolation room, and got caught and sentenced to 2 weeks of isolation. However, when I broke a rule (by taking of my shoes, which were really painful) I got another two weeks. So I was asking whether the rules which you will read are fair and justified?
The booths/cell:
1. Around 30 of the cells/booths
2. A desk with high floor to ceiling walls going back 2.5 metres, with a piece of wood covering the legs and feet
The rules:
1. No talking or other communication with other students
2. No turning around, or looking around the room or the cell
3. No electronic equipment all to be given to the member of staff
4. No bags or other such objects In the cell, to be left in front.
5. Continuous work, or silently face the wall opposite for a period then another choice
6. Full school uniform at all times ( here in my cell I removed my shoes, and had plain white socks to a full black uniform, so I got 2 extra weeks, of isolation for that)
7.Each day of isolation has a detention
8. You report to isolation at 08:30 and finish at 4:30
9. Only a cold school meal, and no own snacks or similar.
10. Breaking this had more isolation,
So now o ask you, is this just my school or common?
0
reply
Iñigo de Loyola
  • Political Ambassador
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#18
Report 1 year ago
#18
In my school the problem is that:
1) It's a strict school with a few chavs or whatever the East London version is of them.
2) School construction is paska (look it up).
3) Isolation is in the carpark in a portacabin.
Which leads to:
4) No talking in changing rooms (another portacabin) or in car park as we may "disrupt" the chav contingent's "learning" - we have to go through the car park to get to the park for PE.
Last edited by Iñigo de Loyola; 1 year ago
1
reply
TobyyyA
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#19
Report 1 year ago
#19
The fact you keep getting 2 weeks on 2 weeks on 2 weeks doesn’t sound right F
0
reply
ZOMBIEKILLER16x
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#20
Report 1 year ago
#20
(Original post by username3885888)
Recently, I lost some BTEC sport work, In the isolation room, and got caught and sentenced to 2 weeks of isolation. However, when I broke a rule (by taking of my shoes, which were really painful) I got another two weeks. So I was asking whether the rules which you will read are fair and justified?
The booths/cell:
1. Around 30 of the cells/booths
2. A desk with high floor to ceiling walls going back 2.5 metres, with a piece of wood covering the legs and feet
The rules:
1. No talking or other communication with other students
2. No turning around, or looking around the room or the cell
3. No electronic equipment all to be given to the member of staff
4. No bags or other such objects In the cell, to be left in front.
5. Continuous work, or silently face the wall opposite for a period then another choice
6. Full school uniform at all times ( here in my cell I removed my shoes, and had plain white socks to a full black uniform, so I got 2 extra weeks, of isolation for that)
7.Each day of isolation has a detention
8. You report to isolation at 08:30 and finish at 4:30
9. Only a cold school meal, and no own snacks or similar.
10. Breaking this had more isolation,
So now o ask you, is this just my school or common?
Nah when a teacher tried putting me in isolation I shouted at him and told him to f*ck off and nothing more happened
Last edited by ZOMBIEKILLER16x; 1 year ago
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

With no certainty that exams next year wil take place, how does this make you feel?

More motivated (31)
26.05%
Less motivated (88)
73.95%

Watched Threads

View All