heathersmusical
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I've just finished year 12 and I'm stuck between doing civil or mechanical engineering at university. When I graduate I'm not entirely sure what I want to do, I have a very broad idea. At the moment I really like the idea of aerospace, renewable energy and structures (I know..this is the problem.)

I really like the idea of mechanical as so far in physics I've really enjoyed mechanics and it's my favourite part of maths as well. however people have told me this is the hardest engineering discipline and you have to be really bright to do this (I'm not naturally bright but I will work hard). if I did mechanical then I'd be able to specialise into aerospace or renewable energy.

I also really like the idea of civil engineering because it also involves physics including parts of mechanic I've particularly liked doing like forces and moments. however people have told me that it isn't a particularly broad subject so if I didn't like certain areas then I'd be a bit stuck. if I did this then I could do structural or renewable energy.

I'm really stuck , any opinions are welcome and any advice would be so much appreciated

Thanks in advanced
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S2M
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(Original post by heathersmusical)
I've just finished year 12 and I'm stuck between doing civil or mechanical engineering at university. When I graduate I'm not entirely sure what I want to do, I have a very broad idea. At the moment I really like the idea of aerospace, renewable energy and structures (I know..this is the problem.)

I really like the idea of mechanical as so far in physics I've really enjoyed mechanics and it's my favourite part of maths as well. however people have told me this is the hardest engineering discipline and you have to be really bright to do this (I'm not naturally bright but I will work hard). if I did mechanical then I'd be able to specialise into aerospace or renewable energy.

I also really like the idea of civil engineering because it also involves physics including parts of mechanic I've particularly liked doing like forces and moments. however people have told me that it isn't a particularly broad subject so if I didn't like certain areas then I'd be a bit stuck. if I did this then I could do structural or renewable energy.

I'm really stuck , any opinions are welcome and any advice would be so much appreciated

Thanks in advanced
I’d say Mechanical Engineering since its more broad. You could do a masters in Structural or Aerospace after a BEng.
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heathersmusical
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(Original post by Black Water)
I’d say Mechanical Engineering since its more broad. You could do a masters in Structural or Aerospace after a BEng.
Thank you , is there much structural in mechanical engineering BEng?
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S2M
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(Original post by heathersmusical)
Thank you , is there much structural in mechanical engineering BEng?
I don’t think so, since it’s a part of civil engineering.
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Adridk
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Mechanical and civil are very different fields. Mechanical is the broadest engineering field. If you want to structural engineering that will involve designing big structures like bridges so you will be doing a lot of calculations together with simulation. In mechanical you can be doing something similar but you will also be involved with doing a lot of CAD, manufacturing and other stuff. The advantage of mechanical engineering is that depending on the university you go, you can do robotics. It really depends on the options of the university. Also consider that a civil engineer is always moving from one place to another, a mechanical engineer as a more stable job in therms of location.
Look for job offer for both and see if you imagine yourself doing what those companies offer.
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heathersmusical
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(Original post by Adridk)
Mechanical and civil are very different fields. Mechanical is the broadest engineering field. If you want to structural engineering that will involve designing big structures like bridges so you will be doing a lot of calculations together with simulation. In mechanical you can be doing something similar but you will also be involved with doing a lot of CAD, manufacturing and other stuff. The advantage of mechanical engineering is that depending on the university you go, you can do robotics. It really depends on the options of the university. Also consider that a civil engineer is always moving from one place to another, a mechanical engineer as a more stable job in therms of location.
Look for job offer for both and see if you imagine yourself doing what those companies offer.
Thank you!
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Doones
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(Original post by heathersmusical)
I've just finished year 12 and I'm stuck between doing civil or mechanical engineering at university. When I graduate I'm not entirely sure what I want to do, I have a very broad idea. At the moment I really like the idea of aerospace, renewable energy and structures (I know..this is the problem.)

I really like the idea of mechanical as so far in physics I've really enjoyed mechanics and it's my favourite part of maths as well. however people have told me this is the hardest engineering discipline and you have to be really bright to do this (I'm not naturally bright but I will work hard). if I did mechanical then I'd be able to specialise into aerospace or renewable energy.

I also really like the idea of civil engineering because it also involves physics including parts of mechanic I've particularly liked doing like forces and moments. however people have told me that it isn't a particularly broad subject so if I didn't like certain areas then I'd be a bit stuck. if I did this then I could do structural or renewable energy.

I'm really stuck , any opinions are welcome and any advice would be so much appreciated

Thanks in advanced
You could do a General Engineering course for year 1 (and sometimes year 2) before specialising into aero or civil (or something completely different).

Many general engineers completely change their mind about their original specialisation during the course.

Alternatively a BEng in MechEng would be absolutely fine for a MSc in Structural or Aero or just about any specialisation.

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heathersmusical
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
You could do a General Engineering course for year 1 (and sometimes year 2) before specialising into aero or civil (or something completely different).

Many general engineers completely change their mind about their original specialisation during the course.

Alternatively a BEng in MechEng would be absolutely fine for a MSc in Structural or Aero or just about any specialisation.

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Thank you
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trapking
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(Original post by heathersmusical)
Thank you , is there much structural in mechanical engineering BEng?
Yes but it is not the main focus of the degree like it is in say Civil Engineering. In Civil Engineering they take it further by studying things like soil mechanics (learning how the ground/soil affects structures) etc.

In Mech Engineering you will learn about structural engineering in particular how to solve common beam bending problems, FEA/FEM, material engineering, common failure modes etc etc.
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heathersmusical
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(Original post by trapking)
Yes but it is not the main focus of the degree like it is in say Civil Engineering. In Civil Engineering they take it further by studying things like soil mechanics (learning how the ground/soil affects structures) etc.

In Mech Engineering you will learn about structural engineering in particular how to solve common beam bending problems, FEA/FEM, material engineering, common failure modes etc etc.
thanks , I really appreciate your advice
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jason0597
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(Original post by heathersmusical)
I've really enjoyed mechanics and it's my favourite part of maths as well.

[...]

I've particularly liked doing like forces and moments.
Keep in mind that the material that you will be covering will be much higher level than this
Take for example ICL's material, Civil Engineering and Mechanical Engineering
You'll be doing things like fluid dynamics, mechatronics creative design, etc.

And for reference, here's what you'll be doing in mechanics (source):
Spoiler:
Show


Image

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Smack
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(Original post by heathersmusical)
I've just finished year 12 and I'm stuck between doing civil or mechanical engineering at university. When I graduate I'm not entirely sure what I want to do, I have a very broad idea. At the moment I really like the idea of aerospace, renewable energy and structures (I know..this is the problem.)

I really like the idea of mechanical as so far in physics I've really enjoyed mechanics and it's my favourite part of maths as well. however people have told me this is the hardest engineering discipline and you have to be really bright to do this (I'm not naturally bright but I will work hard). if I did mechanical then I'd be able to specialise into aerospace or renewable energy.

I also really like the idea of civil engineering because it also involves physics including parts of mechanic I've particularly liked doing like forces and moments. however people have told me that it isn't a particularly broad subject so if I didn't like certain areas then I'd be a bit stuck. if I did this then I could do structural or renewable energy.

I'm really stuck , any opinions are welcome and any advice would be so much appreciated

Thanks in advanced
If you like aerospace, mechanical is better for that. Civil is better for structures, though, as it includes a lot of structural engineering, and most building and infrastructure design consultancies are probably looking for graduates with civil & structural engineering degrees for structural roles. Although you can do stuff like aerospace structures with a mech eng degree, and renewables is quite broad.

A general engineering course might be a good idea. And, as others have also noted, you could do an MSc in structural engineering with a BEng in mechanical engineering.
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helen877
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(Original post by heathersmusical)
I've just finished year 12 and I'm stuck between doing civil or mechanical engineering at university. When I graduate I'm not entirely sure what I want to do, I have a very broad idea. At the moment I really like the idea of aerospace, renewable energy and structures (I know..this is the problem.)

I really like the idea of mechanical as so far in physics I've really enjoyed mechanics and it's my favourite part of maths as well. however people have told me this is the hardest engineering discipline and you have to be really bright to do this (I'm not naturally bright but I will work hard). if I did mechanical then I'd be able to specialise into aerospace or renewable energy.

I also really like the idea of civil engineering because it also involves physics including parts of mechanic I've particularly liked doing like forces and moments. however people have told me that it isn't a particularly broad subject so if I didn't like certain areas then I'd be a bit stuck. if I did this then I could do structural or renewable energy.

I'm really stuck , any opinions are welcome and any advice would be so much appreciated

Thanks in advanced
Don't worry,

The engineering fields and degrees are rather interchangeable

For example most engineering degrees will cover the same fundamentals, such as Mechanics, the first year modules are usually the same, and if not they are often interchangeable and even in the second year. .

the core of the engineering modules in a lot of unis is the same and there are just a small modules which may differ. such as in civils you may have a module on structures whereas in mechanical it may be on manufacturing or something different.

So if you did 1st year mechanical and wanted to change and do civil in the second year that usually would be fine. or even in t second year.

Even after graduation it isn't too much of a problem. As the engineering accrediting bodies such as IMechE for Mechanical and ICE are regulated by the UK engineering council, so they are both accredited engineering degrees, so with the relevant experience, when you go for accreditation, they are a flexible with this and you can prove you have the knowledge with a technical report, proving you have the competency etc. So it shouldn't be too much hindrance to become a Mechanical engineer with a civil degree and vice versa.


As for mechanics, Civil engineering uses just as much mechanics as mechanical, the difference being in civil you may focus more on statics , such as for structures where as in mechanical you may do more dynamics, but you may be sitting the same mechanics paper in the same hall alongside the students of other engineering disciplines.


Hope this helps
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