B1407 – Constitution of the United Kingdom Bill 2018 Watch

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B1407 – Constitution of the United Kingdom Bill 2018, Aph, Pugglet MP

Opening Remarks and NotesThank You Mr Speaker,
I would like to start this discussion with why I have opted to go with the unusual procedure of writing my notes at the start of this bill. Given how long the bill is and how poor TSR formatting is I have decided to supply alongside the bill in TSR form a PDF which, not only is more visually attractive, but is also easier to navigate here.

I have Written this Codified Constitution as I fundamentally believe in the concept of a codified constitution. Having a single document which tells everyone how your country is run, who your people are and what your values are is important. It means that the people can more easily understand what is going on which allows them to participate better.

Some Key features of this constitution are:
  • The Monarchy is kept, the powers of the Monarch are specified and protected. The Monarch is vested with ultimate executive power as well as immunity from the law and fairly broad legislative power.
  • The Executive is removed from the Legislative, this removes the situation where in general elections people think that they are voting for the next leader of the country and not just one representative in parliament.
  • Devolution is codified, meaning that for Parliament to reverse devolution it needs the consent of devolved institutions.
  • The Justice System is codified, meaning that separation of powers in ensured.
  • The House of Lords is reformed to become a house of experts and not a retirement home for politicians and big downers.
  • BOTs and CDs are brought into the UK proper,
  • Free Trade and the Right to Property are enshrined in law.



B1407 – Constitution of the United Kingdom Bill 2018, Aph, Pugglet MP

PREAMBLE

WE THE PEOPLE OF THE UNITED KINGDOM OF GREAT BRITAIN AND NORTHERN IRELAND, HER ASSORTED ISLANDS AND PROTECTORATES, having solemnly resolved to constitute the UNITED KINGDOM into a SOVEREIGN ANGLICAN DEMOCRATIC MONARCHY.



WE renew our loyalty to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, her children and heirs and resolve to build a society which aims to bring liberty, democracy, independence and peace to the world.



DETERMINED to live together in harmony with mutual respect and consideration for our common diversity,

conscious that our common achievements and failures will impact our children for generations to come,

And in the knowledge that only those who exercise their freedom truly remain free, and that the strength of a people is only measured by the wellbeing of their weakest members,

do HEREBY ADOPT, ENACT AND ENFORCE UPON OURSELVES THIS CONSTITUTION.

PARTS



PART I: THE UNION AND ITS TERRITORY

Article 1: Name and Territory of the Union

  1. The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, her Assorted Islands and Protectorates, henceforth to be called The United Kingdom or The Union, shall be a union of Provinces.
  2. The Provinces and territories thereof shall be as specified in the First Schedule.
  3. The people of Provinces and territories thereof shall henceforth be known as the British.
  4. The territory of The United Kingdom shall be comprised of:
    1. the territories of the Provinces;
    2. the Crown Territories specified in the first schedule; and
    3. such other territories that may be acquired.


Article 2: Admission or Establishment of New Provinces

  1. Parliament may by law, admit into the Union, or establish, new Provinces on such terms as it sees fit.


Article 3: Formation of new Provinces and alteration of areas, boundaries or names of existing Provinces.

  1. Parliament may by law:
    1. form a new Province by separation of territory from any Province or by uniting two or more Provinces or parts of Provinces or by uniting any territory to a part of any Province;
    2. increase the area of any Province;
    3. diminish the area of any Province;
    4. alter the boundaries of any Province;
    5. alter the name of any Province:


Provided that no Bill for the purpose shall be introduced in any House of Parliament except on the recommendation of the Prime Minister and unless, where the proposal contained in the Bill affects the area, boundaries or name of any of the Provinces, the Bill has been referred by the Prime Minister to the Legislature of that Province for expressing its views thereon within such period as may be specified in the reference or within such further period as the Prime Minister may allow and the period so specified or allowed has expired.

Article 4: Succession of Provinces from the Union.

  1. Any Provincial legislature may, upon the agreement of 2/3rd of its members, initiate a referendum on independence from the Union in their Province.
    1. The First Minister for Northern Ireland must initiate such a referendum if the Good Friday Agreement requires it.
  2. The question on the ballot shall be “Should the Province of [Province name] leave the United Kingdom of Great Britain, Northern Ireland, Her Assorted Islands and Protectorates”
  3. The Answers shall be “Yes” and “No”.
  4. The referendum is considered passed if more than 33% of eligible voters vote yes and more people vote yes than no.
  5. On the passing of an aforementioned referendum the Prime Minister is compelled to recommend a bill to Parliament which makes the necessary changes to law to make the Province independant.




Article 5: Laws made under articles 2, 3 and 4 to provide for the amendment of the First and the Fourth Schedules and supplemental, incidental and consequential matters.

  1. Any law referred to in Article 2, Article 3 or Article 4 shall contain such provisions for the amendment of the First Schedule and the Fourth Schedule as may be necessary to give effect to the provisions of the law and may also contain such supplemental, incidental and consequential provisions (including provisions as to representation in Parliament and in the Legislature or Legislatures of the Province or Provinces affected by such law) as Parliament may deem necessary.
  2. No such law as aforesaid shall be deemed to be an amendment of this Constitution for the purposes of Article 216.




PART II: CITIZENSHIP

Article 6: Citizenship at the Commencement of the Constitution.

  1. At the Commencement of this Constitution, every person who is:
    1. a British citizen;
    2. a British Overseas territory citizen;
    3. a British Overseas citizen;
    4. a British Subject;
    5. a British National (Overseas); or
    6. a British Protected Person


as defined by law, shall be a citizen of The United Kingdom, or British citizen for short.



Article 7: Rights of Citizenship of certain persons of British origin.

  1. Any person may freely obtain British citizenship provided that at the time of their birth:
    1. At least one of their parents was a British citizen;
    2. At the time of their parents’ birth at least one of their respective parents’ parents was a British citizen;
  2. British citizen as above shall be taken to include anyone who, had they been alive upon the commencement of this constitution would have been a citizen of The United Kingdom according to Article5 had it been in force at the time.
  3. If a person is adopted lawfully before the age of 18 only their adopted lineage shall apply in this article.


Article 8: Continuance of the Right to Citizenship.

  1. Every person who is or is deemed to be a citizen of The United Kingdom under any of the foregoing provisions of this Part shall, subject to the provisions of any law that may be made by Parliament, continue to be such citizen.


Article 9: Parliament to regulate the right of citizenship by law

  1. Nothing in the foregoing provisions of this Part shall derogate from the power of Parliament to make any provision with respect to the acquisition and termination of citizenship and all other matters relating to citizenship.


PART III: FUNDAMENTAL RIGHTS

GENERAL

Article 10: Definition.

  1. In this Part, unless the context otherwise requires, “the State’’ includes the Government and Parliament of The United Kingdom and the Government and the Legislature of each of the Provinces and all local or other authorities within the territory of The United Kingdom or under the control of the Government of The United Kingdom.




Article 11: Laws inconsistent or in derogation of the fundamental rights.

  1. All laws in force in the territory of The United Kingdom immediately before the commencement of this Constitution, in so far as they are inconsistent with the provisions of this Part, shall, to the extent of such inconsistency, be void.
  2. The State shall not make any law which takes away or abridges the rights conferred by this Part and any law made in contravention of this clause shall, to the extent of the contravention, be void.
    1. Except where The State believes that one person exercising their rights would harm the rights of another, in which case The State may legislate to protect one right over another.
  3. In this article:
    1. “law” includes any Ordinance, order, bye-law, rule, regulation, notification, custom or usage having in the territory of The United Kingdom the force of law;
    2. “laws in force” includes laws passed or made by a legislature or other competent authority in the territory of The United Kingdom before the commencement of this Constitution and not previously repealed, notwithstanding that any such law or any part thereof may not be then in operation either at all or in particular areas.
  4. Nothing in this article shall apply to any amendment of this Constitution made under Article 216.


RIGHT TO EQUALITY



Article 12: Equality before the law.

  1. The State shall not deny to any person equality before the law or the equal protection of the laws within the territory of The United Kingdom.
  2. The State shall not discriminate against any citizen on grounds only of religion, race, sex, gender, age, disability, sexual orientation, language, political ideology, place of birth or any such characteristic.
  3. No citizen shall, on grounds only of religion, race, sex, gender, age, disability, sexual orientation, political ideology, place of birth or any such characteristic, be subject to any disability, liability, restriction or condition with regard to:
    1. access to shops, public restaurants, hotels and places of public entertainment; or
    2. the use of any service wholly or partly funded by The State for general public use or consumption.
  4. Nothing in this article shall prevent the state from running programs which enhance the prospects or abilities of otherwise disadvantaged persons.


Article 13: Equality of opportunity in public employment.

  1. There shall be equality of opportunity for all citizens in matters relating to employment or appointment to any office under The State.
  2. No citizen shall, on grounds only of religion, race, sex, gender, age, disability, sexual orientation, political ideology, place of birth, residence or any such characteristic, be ineligible for, or discriminated against in respect of, any employment or office under The State.
  3. Nothing in this article shall prevent Parliament from making any law prescribing, in regard to a class or classes of employment or appointment to an office under the Government of, or any local or other authority within, a Province or Crown Territory, any requirement as to residence within that Province or Crown Territory prior to such employment or appointment
  4. Nothing in this article shall prevent the State from making any provision for the reservation of appointments or posts in favour of any disadvantaged group of citizens which, in the opinion of the State, is not adequately represented in the services under the State.




RIGHT TO FREEDOM

Article 14: Protection of certain rights

  1. All citizens shall have the right to:
    1. freedom of speech and expression;
    2. assemble peacefully and without arms;
    3. form unions and associations;
    4. move freely throughout the territory of The United Kingdom;
    5. reside and settle in any part of the territory of The United Kingdom;
    6. practice any profession, trade or business;
    7. pursue any private economic activity;
    8. enter and leave the country;
    9. use any language they so wish;
    10. privacy;
    11. artistic expression;
    12. assistance when they cannot carry out tasks required to live by themselves;
    13. own property and be paid in full when The State removes such property from them.
  2. Nothing in this article prevents The State from regulating the expressions of these freedoms in any way it sees fit to ensure the rule of law, peace and prosperity in The United Kingdom or the enactment of laws or requirements which are seen as being for the good of the Public.


Article 15: Immutable Rights

  1. All citizens are guaranteed the right to:
    1. human dignity;
    2. life;
    3. not to be tortured;
    4. physical and mental integrity;
    5. marry and have a family;
    6. follow any religion or lack thereof they so wish;


Article 16: Protection against expulsion, extradition and deportation

  1. British citizens may not be expelled from The United Kingdom and may only be extradited to a foreign authority with their consent.
  2. Refugees may not be deported or extradited to a state in which they will be persecuted.
  3. No person may be deported to a state in which they face the threat of torture or any other form of cruel or inhumane treatment or punishment.




RULE OF LAW

Article 17: Protection in respect to conviction for offences.

  1. No person shall be convicted of any offence except for violation of a law in force at the time of the commission of the act charged as an offence, nor be subjected to a penalty greater than that which might have been inflicted under the law in force at the time of the commission of the offence.
  2. No person shall be prosecuted and punished for the same offence more than once.
    1. Save for when a judge determines that significant new evidence that, had it been available at the time, would have changed the result of a trial.
  3. No person accused of any offence shall be compelled to be a witness against himself.


Article 18: Protection against detention and arrest in certain cases.

  1. No person who is arrested shall be detained in custody without being informed, as soon as may be, of the grounds for such arrest nor shall they be denied the right to consult, and to be defended by, a legal practitioner of their choice.
  2. Every person who is arrested and detained in custody shall be produced before the nearest magistrate within a period of twenty-four hours of such arrest excluding the time necessary for the journey from the place of arrest to the court of the magistrate and no such person shall be detained in custody beyond the said period without the authority of a magistrate.


Article 19: Law and the State.

  1. All activities of the state are based on and limited by law.
  2. State activities must be conducted in the public interest and be proportionate to the ends sought.
  3. State institutions and private persons shall act in good faith when dealing with each other.
  4. The United Kingdom and the Provinces shall respect international law.


Article 20: Individual and Collective Responsibility.

  1. All individuals shall take responsibility for themselves and shall, according to their abilities, contribute to achieving the tasks of the state and society.




RIGHT AGAINST EXPLOITATION

Article 21: Prohibition of human trafficking and forced labour.

  1. Traffic in human beings and other similar forms of forced labour are prohibited and any contravention of this provision shall be an offence punishable in accordance with law.
  2. Nothing in this article shall prevent the State from imposing compulsory service for public purposes, and in imposing such service the State shall not make any discrimination as in accordance with Article 12.


Article 22: Prohibition of child labour.

  1. No child below the age of fourteen years shall be employed to work in any factory or mine or engaged in any other hazardous employment.


RIGHT TO EDUCATION

Article 23: Right of children to a basic education.

  1. The State shall provide free and compulsory education to all children of the age of four to sixteen years in such manner as the State may, by law, determine.


Article 24: Right to academic freedom.

  1. Freedom of research and teaching is guaranteed.


RIGHT TO CONSTITUTIONAL REMEDIES

Article 25: Guarantee of access to the courts.

  1. In a legal dispute, every person has the right to have their case determined by a judicial authority. The Union and the Provinces may by law preclude the determination by the courts of certain exceptional categories of case.


Article 26: Judicial Proceedings.

  1. Any person whose case falls to be judicially decided has the right to have their case heard by a legally constituted, competent, independent and impartial court. Ad hoc courts are prohibited.
  2. Unless otherwise provided by law, any person against whom civil proceedings have been raised has the right to have their case decided by a court within the jurisdiction in which they reside.
  3. Unless the law provides otherwise, court hearings and the delivery of judgments shall be in public.


Article 27: The Supreme Court.

  1. The right to move the Supreme Court by appropriate proceedings for the enforcement of the rights conferred by this Part is guaranteed.
  2. The Supreme Court shall have power to issue directions or orders or writs, including writs in the nature of habeas corpus, mandatory orders, prohibiting orders, quo warranto and quashing orders, whichever may be appropriate, for the enforcement of any of the rights conferred by this Part.
  3. Without prejudice to the powers conferred on the Supreme Court by clauses (1) and (2), Parliament may by law empower any other court to exercise within the local limits of its jurisdiction all or any of the powers exercisable by the Supreme Court under clause (2).
  4. The Supreme Court is the ultimate judicial authority in The United Kingdom and is responsible for the enforcement of this constitution in accordance to law.


Article 28: Power of Parliament to modify rights applied to the armed forces.

  1. Parliament may, by law, determine to what extent any of the rights conferred by this Part shall, in their application to,—
    1. the members of the Armed Forces; or
    2. the members of the Forces charged with the maintenance of public order; or
    3. persons employed in any bureau or other organisation established by the State for purposes of intelligence or counterintelligence; or
    4. person employed in, or in connection with, the telecommunication systems set up for the purposes of any Force, bureau or organisation referred to in clauses (a) to (c),


be restricted or abrogated so as to ensure the proper discharge of their duties and the maintenance of discipline among them.



PART IV: DIRECTIVE PRINCIPLES OF STATE POLICY

Article 29: Definition.

  1. In this part, unless the context otherwise requires it, “The State” shall have the same definition as in Part III.


Article 30: Application of the principles contained in this part.

  1. The provisions contained in this part shall not be enforceable by any court, but the principles therein laid down are nevertheless fundamental in the governance of the country and it shall be the duty of the State to apply these principles in making laws.


Article 31: The main aims and principles of state.

  1. The State shall strive to promote the welfare of the people by securing and protecting as effectively as it may a social order in which justice, social, economic and political, shall inform all the institutions of the national life.
  2. The State shall, in particular, strive to minimise the inequalities in opportunity, and endeavour to eliminate inequalities in status and facilities, not only amongst individuals but also amongst groups of people residing in different areas or engaged in different vocations.
  3. The state shall also ensure that:
    1. the citizens, men and women equally, have the right to an adequate means of livelihood;
    2. that children are given opportunities and facilities to develop in a healthy manner and in conditions of freedom and dignity and that childhood and youth are protected against exploitation and against moral and material abandonment.


Article 32: Equality of justice and legal aid

  1. The State shall secure that the operation of the legal system promotes justice, on a basis of equal opportunity, and shall, in particular, provide free legal aid, by suitable legislation or schemes or in any other way, to ensure that opportunities for securing justice are not denied to any citizen by reason of economic or other disabilities.


Article 33: Right to public assistance.

  1. The State shall, within the limits of its economic capacity and development, make effective provision for securing the right to work, to education and to public assistance in cases of unemployment, old age, sickness and disablement, and in other cases of undeserved want.


Article 34: Right to humane working conditions.

  1. The State shall make provision for securing just and humane conditions of work and for maternity relief.


Article 35: Environmental protections.

  1. The State shall endeavour to protect and improve the environment and to safeguard the forests and wildlife of the country.


Article 36: Sites of Historic or Cultural interest

  1. It shall be the obligation of the State to protect every monument or place or object of artistic or historic interest, declared by or under law made by Parliament to be of national importance, from spoliation, disfigurement, destruction, removal, disposal or export, as the case may be.


Article 37: Separation of the judiciary

  1. The State shall take steps to separate the judiciary from the executive in the public services of the State.


Article 38: Fostering international relations.

  1. The State shall endeavour to:
    1. promote international peace and security;
    2. maintain just and honourable relations between nations;
    3. foster respect for international law and treaty obligations in the dealings of organised peoples with one another; and
    4. encourage settlement of international disputes by arbitration.
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Bxxx Constitution of the United Kingdom Bill Part II

PART V: THE UNION



CHAPTER I: - THE EXECUTIVE

THE MONARCHY

Article 39: The Monarch of the United Kingdom

  1. There shall be a Monarch of The United Kingdom.
  2. The Monarch shall serve until their death or abdication of the throne.


Article 40: Appointment of the Monarch

  1. Upon the death or abdication of the previous Monarch the next Monarch shall be the first qualified person on this list:
    1. The Monarch’s oldest child;
    2. The Monarchs oldest sibling;
    3. Whomsoever the Monarch, by royal decree determines will be their successor;
    4. The Monarchs oldest aunt or uncle from the royal line;
    5. The Monarchs oldest great-aunt or great-uncle from the royal line;
    6. The person elected by a public vote.
  2. In determining this person, if a person on the list predeceased the Monarch, their children, and their children's children, shall be considered to inherit the role of Monarch passing down the oldest lines first.


Article 41: Monarch's powers in relation to legislation.

  1. All bills passed by Parliament only become law upon the Monarch signing them.
    1. The Monarch may not refuse to sign a bill passed by Parliament into law except under the advice of the Executive Council at the time.
    2. If any of the Houses of Commons or Provinces passes said bill by a supermajority of 66% then subparagraph (a) may not be enacted.
  2. The Monarch may veto any amendment to the constitution that affects Chapters I, II, III or V of the constitution:
    1. save for an amendment that passes with a majority of 75% of all houses voting in favour of it.
  3. The Monarch has absolute power to veto any amendment to this article and to Articles 40 and 44.
  4. The Monarch may veto any executive order and is compelled to do so if they reasonably believe the order would have a net negative effect on the rule of law or the British people.
    1. Save for an executive order passed by a majority of 80% of the Executive Council and approved by at least 50% of First Ministers


Article 42: Monarch as head of state.

  1. The Monarch is the supreme representative of The United Kingdom as well as its head of state.
  2. The Monarch will formally inaugurate the Prime Minister, Deputy Prime Minister, all members of the Executive Council and the Council of Ministers, The Attorney General for the United Kingdom, the Speakers of Parliament, the First Ministers and Deputy First Ministers and Advocate Generals of Province into their roles.
  3. The Monarch will formally open and close Parliament.
  4. The Monarch is the defender of the constitution and ultimate authority of the United Kingdom.


Article 43: Protection from law.

  1. The Monarch may not face criminal proceedings against them except in the case they have broken the constitution.
  2. The Monarch may not testify at any criminal or civil proceedings except their own.


Article 44: Regency

  1. Should the new Monarch appointed under Article 40 be under the age of twenty one years, or the current Monarch, or Regent, be declared mentally infirm in the way laid out below there shall be a Regent appointed.
  2. The Regent shall be the next person, permanently domicile within the United Kingdom who is over the age of twenty one years, who would be appointed monarch under Article 40.
  3. The current Monarch or Regent shall be declared mentally infirm if at least 3 of the following write, by their own hand, an open letter declaring that they believe them to be so:
    1. The spouse of the Monarch;
    2. The Speaker of the House of Commons;
    3. The Speaker of the House of Provinces;
    4. The Chief Justice of the United Kingdom;
    5. The Deputy Chief Justice of the United Kingdom;
    6. The Lord Chancellor;
  4. During a time if Regency the Regent shall be the legal guardian of the Monarch.


Article 45: Miscellaneous provisions.

  1. All functions of the Monarch previous to the adoption of this constitution and not accounted for in this constitution shall continue to be carried out by the Monarch or their appointed person until such a time when Parliament legislates for this power to be moved.


THE PRIME MINISTER AND THE DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER

Article 46: The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom

  1. There shall be a Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.
  2. The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom shall be the supreme executive representative of the United Kingdom


Article 47: Election of the Prime Minister.

  1. At the start of a new term of the Executive Council the Prime Minister shall be appointed as the person who was elected to that sitting of the Executive Council first in accordance with Article 66.


Article 48: Term of office of the Prime Minister

  1. The Prime Minister shall hold office from the date on which they is elected until such a time that either:
    1. a new Executive Council has been elected and inducted;
    2. the Prime Minister, by their own hand, writes and delivers a letter to the Monarch formally resigning;
    3. for violation of the constitution is impeached in the manner set out in Article 68;
    4. for becoming mentally incapacitated is impeached in the manner set out in Article 69;
    5. for losing the faith of the legislature loses a Vote of No Confidence in the manner set out in Article 73; or
    6. they die.


Article 49: Ability for re-election of the Prime Minister.

  1. Any person who has served two terms as Prime Minister may not stand for election to the Executive Council.


Article 50: Powers of the Prime Minister.

  1. The Prime Minister shall be the head of the Executive Council of the United Kingdom and chair its meetings.
  2. The Prime Minister has the right to declare a state of emergency in which they can exercise the full power of the Executive Council themselves until such a time as it is reasonable for the Executive Council to convene.
  3. The Prime Minister has the casting vote in all decisions made by the Executive Council.


Article 51: Conditions on the office of Prime Minister

  1. The Prime Minister shall not hold any other office of profit.
  2. The Prime Minister shall be entitled without payment of rent to the use of their official residences and shall be also entitled to such emoluments, allowances and privileges as may be determined by Parliament by law and, until provision in that behalf is so made, such emoluments, allowances and privileges as are specified in the Second Schedule.
  3. The emoluments and allowances of the Prime Minister shall not be diminished during their term of office.


Article 52: Oath of the Prime Minister.

  1. Every Prime Minister and every person acting as Prime Minister or discharging the functions of the Prime Minister shall, before entering upon their office, make and subscribe in the presence of the Monarch, an oath or affirmation in the following form, that is to say:


“I, A.B, do (solemnly affirm / swear in the name of God) that I will faithfully execute the office of Prime Minister (or discharge the functions of the Prime Minister) of The United Kingdom and will to the best of my ability preserve, protect and defend the Constitution and the law and that I will devote myself to the service and well-being of the people of The United Kingdom”

Article 53: Temporary incapacity of the Prime Minister.

  1. Should the Prime Minister be incapable for fulfilling their role due to events outside of their control, but not as a result of Article 48, the (Acting) Deputy Prime Minister shall discharge the role of Prime Minister.


Article 54: Total incapacity of the Prime Minister.

  1. Should the Prime Minister be subject to Article 48, paragraph 1, sub-paragraphs b-f, they are deemed to be “Totally Incapacitated”.
  2. Upon total incapacity of the Prime Minister the Deputy Prime Minister is to be sworn in as Prime Minister until the end of their term.


Article 55: The Deputy Prime Minister of The United Kingdom.

  1. There shall be a Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.


Article 56: Election of the Deputy Prime Minister.

  1. At the start of a new term of the Executive Council the Deputy Prime Minister shall be appointed as the person who was elected to that sitting of the Executive Council second in accordance with Article 66.


Article 57: Term of office of the Deputy Prime Minister.

  1. The Deputy Prime Minister shall hold office from the date on which they is elected until such a time that either:


  1. a. a new Executive Council has been elected and inducted;
  2. b. the Prime Minister is totally incapacitated;
  3. c. the Deputy Prime Minister, by their own hand, writes and delivers a letter to the Monarch formally resigning;
  4. d. for violation of the constitution is impeached in the manner set out in Article 68;
  5. e. for becoming mentally incapacitated is impeached in the manner set out in Article 69;
  6. f. for losing the faith of the legislature loses a Vote of No Confidence in the manner set out in Article 73; or
  7. g. they die.


Article 58: Ability for Re-election of the Deputy Prime Minister

  1. Holding the office of Deputy Prime Minister does not prevent you from being re-elected to the Executive Council.


Article 59: Conditions on the office of Deputy Prime Minister

  1. The Deputy Prime Minister shall not hold any other office of profit.
  2. The Deputy Prime Minister shall be entitled without payment of rent to the use of their official residences and shall be also entitled to such emoluments, allowances and privileges as may be determined by Parliament by law and, until provision in that behalf is so made, such emoluments, allowances and privileges as are specified in the Second Schedule.
  3. The emoluments and allowances of the Deputy Prime Minister shall not be diminished during their term of office.


Article 60: Oath of the Deputy Prime Minister.

  1. Every Deputy Prime Minister and every person acting as Deputy Prime Minister or discharging the functions of the Deputy Prime Minister shall, before entering upon their office, make and subscribe in the presence of the Monarch, an oath or affirmation in the following form, that is to say:


“I, A.B, do (solemnly affirm / swear in the name of God) that I will faithfully execute the office of Deputy Prime Minister (or discharge the functions of the Prime Minister) of The United Kingdom and will to the best of my ability preserve, protect and defend the Constitution and the law and that I will devote myself to the service and well-being of the people of The United Kingdom”

Article 61: Temporary incapacity of the Deputy Prime Minister.

  1. Should the Deputy Prime Minister be incapable for fulfilling their role due to events outside of their control, but not as a result of Article 54, the next highest elected person to that sitting of the Executive Council, in accordance with Article 66, shall discharge the role of Deputy Prime Minister.
    1. Members of the Executive Council who have not lost a Vote of No Confidence during that sitting of the Council of the Executive shall be given priority over those who have.
    2. Members who have already been Prime Minister or Deputy Prime Minister in that sitting of the Council of the Executive shall come second to those who have not.


Article 62: Total incapacity of the Deputy Prime Minister.

  1. Should the Deputy Prime Minister be subject to Article 57, paragraph 1, sub-paragraphs b-g, they are deemed to be “Totally Incapacitated”.
  2. Upon total incapacity of the Deputy Prime Minister the next highest elected person to that sitting of the Executive Council, in accordance with Article 66, shall discharge the role of Deputy Prime Minister.
    1. Members of the Executive Council who have not lost a Vote of No Confidence during that sitting of the Council of the Executive shall be given priority over those who have.
    2. Members who have already been Prime Minister or Deputy Prime Minister in that sitting of the Council of the Executive shall come second to those who have not.


THE EXECUTIVE COUNCIL OF THE UNITED KINGDOM

Article 63: The Executive Council of the United Kingdom

  1. There shall be an Executive Council of the United Kingdom.


Article 64: Composition of the Executive Council.

  1. The Executive Council shall be made up of members elected to the Executive Council in accordance to Article 66 who shall be called Members of the Executive Council (or MEC’s).
  2. All First Ministers, or their deputies in their stead, may attend and and all meetings of the Executive Council but may not vote.
  3. The Attorney General for the United Kingdom shall be a full member of the Executive Council


Article 65: Eligibility to stand for election to the Executive Council.

  1. No person may stand for election to the Executive Council unless they:
    1. are british Citizens residing in the Territories of the United Kingdom as laid out in Article 1;
    2. are not a member of any of the Houses of Parliament, Provincial legislature or Provincial executive.
    3. are eligible to vote in an election of the Executive Council; and
    4. are not subject to any other lawful impediment as set by Parliament.


Article 66: Election of the Executive Council.

  1. The Executive Council shall be elected in a national ballot.
  2. There shall be as many people elected as there are Secretaries of State listed in the Fourth Schedule plus two.
  3. The election shall use an open list Saint-Lauge where:
    1. no party may have more than 35% of the seats;
    2. there is only one constituency, the United Kingdom; and
    3. each party may only list as many members as seats it can win.
  4. The first elected person shall be the person who was elected in the first round.
    1. The second highest elected person shall be the person who was elected in the second round and so on;
    2. In the event that a member of the Executive Council is replaced their replacement is added to the bottom of this list.


Article 67: Term of Office for a Member of the Executive Council

  1. A new election of the Executive Council shall happen when:
    1. A period of 7 years has passed since the last election.
    2. More than 50% of the members have been replaced from the original membership of the council at the start of term.
    3. If Article 82, sub-paragraph 3a applies then the life of the Executive Council is extended until the election of the House of Commons.
  2. A Member of the Executive Council shall hold office from the date on which they is elected until such a time that either:
    1. a new Executive Council has been elected and inducted;
    2. by their own hand, writes and delivers a letter to the Monarch formally resigning;
    3. for violation of the constitution is impeached in the manner set out in Article 68;
    4. for becoming mentally incapacitated is impeached in the manner set out in Article 69; or
    5. they die.


Article 68: Impeachment for breaking the constitution.

  1. When a Member of the Executive Council is to be impeached for breaking the constitution no charge may be heard before a court of law until one of the following conditions are met:
    1. One quarter of any house of Parliament vote in favour of such a resolution;
    2. The Monarch orders the impeachment; or
    3. A resolution for doing so is submitted by one quarter of all First Ministers and the Attorney General.
  2. When impeached the Member of the Executive Council may not attend any meetings of the Executive Council and shall not continue to exercise executive power as a secretary of state, Prime Minister or Deputy Prime Minister.
  3. The case shall then be prosecuted in the Supreme Court at the earlier possible time.
    1. Should the Member be found guilty they are removed from office with immediate effect and become ineligible to stand for pubic office anywhere in the United Kingdom.
    2. A member who is found innocent shall resume office.


Article 69: Impeachment for mental incapacity

  1. Before taking office and every 12 months after each Member of the Executive Council is required to have 3 independent mental exams conducted by trained and qualified psychologists whilst in office.
    1. Should one of these psychologists believe that the member is unfit to continue in office they shall recommend to the Monarch that the member be removed from office.
    2. If the Monarch receives two such recommendations for the same member at the same time they shall remove the member from office immediately.


Article 70: Secretaries of State.

  1. Each MEC, bar the Prime Minister and Deputy Prime Minister shall be appointed one of the Secretary of State positions as laid out in the Fourth Schedule by the Prime Minister.
  2. Each Secretary of state may appoint ministers from amongst the members of the House of Commons or the House of Lords to aid them in carrying out their duties.
    1. Among these there must be a Deputy Secretary of State appointed who, in the instance of Article 68 being invoked, shall carry out the duties of Secretary of State for the duration of the Trial.
    2. No more than 40% of the combined membership of the houses of Parliament may be appointed to be a Minister in this way.
  3. Parliament may by law add or remove any secretary of state position to the Fourth Schedule as it sees fit, any such change will only occur when a new election happens.
    1. Amendments to the Fourth Schedule made in this way shall not be treated as amendments to the Constitution.
    2. The Prime Minister may accelerate the addition of a Secretary of State role if they believe it to be urgent, at which point a new member will join the Executive Council in the same way as laid out in sub-clause (1b) of Article 72.
  4. Parliament may with immediate effect expand or reduce the portfolio of any Secretary of State.
  5. Secretaries of State may be removed from a department by a vote of no confidence as per Article 73.
    1. Upon a successful vote of no confidence the Prime Minister is required to move the MEC to a different Secretary of State position.


Article 71: Executive Authority of the Executive Council.

  1. The executive power of the Union shall be vested in the Executive Council and shall be exercised by them either directly or through officers subordinate to them in accordance with this Constitution.
  2. Without prejudice to the generality of the foregoing provision, the supreme command of the Defence Forces of the Union shall be vested in the Executive Council and the exercise thereof shall be regulated by law.
  3. Nothing in this article shall:
    1. be deemed to transfer to the Executive Council any functions conferred by any existing law on the Government of any State or other authority; or
    2. prevent Parliament from conferring by law functions on authorities other than the Executive Council.
  4. Subject to the provisions of this Constitution, the executive power of the Union shall extend:
    1. to the matters with respect to which Parliament has power to make laws; and
    2. to the exercise of such rights, authority and jurisdiction as are exercisable by the Government of the United Kingdom by virtue of any treaty or agreement:


Provided that the executive power referred to in subclause (a) shall not, save as expressly provided in this Constitution or in any law made by Parliament, extend in any Province to matters with respect to which the Legislature of the Province has also power to make laws.

  1. Until otherwise provided by Parliament, a Province and any officer or authority of a Province may, notwithstanding anything in this article, continue to exercise in matters with respect to which Parliament has power to make laws for that Province such executive power or functions as the Province or officer or authority thereof could exercise immediately before the commencement of this Constitution


Article 72: Incapacity of a MEC.

  1. Should any MEC become incapacitated for any reason in Article 67, paragraph 2, sub-paragraphs b-e they shall be replaced in the following ways:
    1. If they were a party candidate:
      1. By the next eligible person on their parties list at the last election; else
      2. by a person their party nominates if there are no eligible people on the list.
    2. If they were an independent candidate:
      1. By a named successor according to their will if they have one; else
      2. by the next eligible person who would have been elected in the previous election; else,
      3. by a nominated member of the biggest party who currently isn’t at their maximum number of seats.


Article 73: Vote of no Confidence in a Secretary of State.

  1. A Motion of No Confidence can be called in any Secretary of State, the Prime Minister or the Deputy Prime Minister at any time.
  2. The motion may be presented to either house first and shall read “That this house has no confidence in the Secretary of State for x to continue to fulfil their duties to the people in accordance to law”
  3. Upon the successful passage through two of the Houses of Parliament the motion is carried.


Article 74: Voting and Quorum of the Executive Council

  1. Save other times as provided for by this constitution all votes in any house will be passed by a simple majority of voting members, other than the person presiding over the vote,
    1. Should there be a tie the Prime Minister shall cast the deciding vote.
  2. Every sitting of every council meeting shall be valid, notwithstanding vacancy in the membership thereof, and all proceedings of Parliament are valid, notwithstanding it is later discovered that some person who had no standing in the seated house partook or voted in the houses business.
  3. The quorum to constitute a meeting of any house shall be three-quarters of the councils total membership.
  4. Should at any point the council not be at quorum it is the duty of the Prime Minister to adjourn the council until such a time as quorocracy is restored.


Article 75: Procedure of the Executive Council

  1. On all matters presented to the council all members who wish to speak may do so.
  2. All members of the council are bound by collective responsibility, no member may reveal the discussions of the council or the way individual members voted on an issue without specific approval from the council.
  3. Unless there are strong feelings one way or another, or there are complex issues to discuss, in general a Secretary of State should be given as much autonomy over the policy of their department as is reasonable to still maintain overall collective responsibility.


THE ATTORNEY GENERAL FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM

Article 76: The Attorney General

  1. The Prime Minister shall appoint an Attorney General from amongst those qualified to be a Judge of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom.
  2. The Attorney General shall be entitled to sit in the House of Lords during their time in office.
  3. The Attorney General shall serve at the pleasure of the Prime Minister.
  4. It shall be the duty of the Attorney-General to give advice to the Government of the United Kingdom upon such legal matters, and to perform such other duties of a legal character, as may from time to time be referred or assigned to him by the Executive Council, and to discharge the functions conferred on them by or under this Constitution or any other law for the time being in force.
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CHAPTER II: - Parliament



GENERAL

Article 77: Constitution of Parliament.

  1. There shall be a Parliament for the United Kingdom which shall consist of three houses, to be known respectively as “the Honourable the Commons of the United Kingdom in Parliament assembled”, or “House of Commons”, “the Right Honourable the Lords Temporal of the United Kingdom in Parliament assembled” or “House of Lords” and “the Honourable the Provinces of the United Kingdom in Parliament assembled” or “House of Provinces”.


Article 78: Composition of the House of Commons.

  1. The House of commons shall be made up of members elected by the people in single and mixed member constituencies using the proportional representation method of Single Transferable vote.
  2. Each county in accordance with the Second Schedule shall be a constituency where:
    1. Each Crown Territory with a permanent population shall receive one seat;
    2. Each county is guaranteed one seat; and
    3. an additional six hundred seats are distributed to each county using the D’hondt method of proportional representation.


Article 79: Composition of the House of Lords.

  1. The House of Lords shall be made up of no more than seven hundred members appointed by the Monarch on the advice of an independent commission.
  2. Members may only be appointed for outstanding contributions to:
    1. academia, no more than three hundred people;
    2. literature, no more than one hundred people;
    3. society and public life, only acts of charity may count here, no more than three hundred people;
    4. Law, no more than one hundred and fifty people;
    5. international relations, no more than one hundred people; and
    6. other notable figures who may be considered “British treasures”, no more than one hundred people.
  3. Members of the House of Lords may not belong or openly affiliate to any political party.
  4. Members of the House of Lords must not have been previously elected to and of the Houses of Parliament.


Article 80: Composition of the House of Provinces.

  1. The House of Provinces shall be made up on an indeterminate number of members.
  2. Each province as per the First schedule shall get three members automatically and;
    1. an additional member if their population is greater than two million;
    2. two additional members if their population is greater than six million; or
    3. three additional members if their population is over eight million.
  3. Members shall be elected from amongst the members of each provincial legislature, elected by their members in a secret Single Transferable Vote ballot.
    1. The First Minister and Deputy First Minister may not be elected by a legislature.
  4. It is at the discretion of each Provincial legislature as to whether Members of the House of Provinces are required to stand down from the legislature once elected.
    1. Should they be made to stand down the candidate has the right to nominate any eligible person to take their place for as long as they remain a member of the House of Provinces


Article 81: Readjustment after each census.

  1. Upon the completion of each census, the allocation of seats in the House of Commons to the Counties and the division of seats in the House of Provinces shall be readjusted by such authority and in such manner as Parliament may by law determine:
    1. Provided that such readjustment shall not affect representation in the House of Parliament until the dissolution of the then existing House


Article 82: Duration of the Houses of Parliament.

  1. The House of Provinces shall not be subject to dissolution, rather, each province at the start of its legislatures new term recalls it’s provincial representatives and elects new ones.
    1. Members of the House of Provinces may, if eligible, stand for re-election as many times as they wish.
  2. The House of Lords shall not be subject to dissolution and all members have unlimited term lengths.
  3. The House of Commons shall, unless sooner dissolved, continue for the period of one thousand, eight hundred and twenty five days from the day of the designated first meeting of this term;
    1. Parliament may, by law, extend the life of the House of Commons for a period of up to five hundred and forty eight days at a time in a state of emergency provided there are less than one hundred and eighty-two days left of the current sitting.


Article 83: Qualifications for membership of Parliament

  1. No person may take a seat in Parliament unless they:
    1. are a british citizen normally domicile in the territories of the United Kingdom according to Article 1;
    2. are not directly in line to inherit the throne;
    3. are over the age of eighteen; and
    4. meet and other qualifications as determined by law.


Article 84: Sessions of Parliament, prorogation and dissolution.

  1. The Monarch shall from time to time summon each House of Parliament to meet at such time and place as they thinks fit, but six months shall not intervene between its last sitting in one session and the date appointed for its first sitting in the next session.
  2. The Monarch may from time to time:
    1. prorogue the houses or any house at the recommendation of the Prime Minister;
    2. dissolve the House of Commons when required by law or constitutionally.


Article 85: Right of the Monarch to address the houses.

  1. The Monarch may address any and all Houses of Parliament and require attendance for such purposes.


Article 86: Right of Secretaries of State to address the house

  1. Any Secretary of State may sit in an conveening of any House of Parliament to talk to or against the merits of any bill before that house.
    1. This right does not allow the Secretary of State to vote on the bill.
    2. For this article the Prime Minister, Attorney General, Provincial First Ministers and Deputy Prime Minister count as Secretaries of State.


Article 87: Right of members of a house to address that house.

  1. Parliament shall make measures to ensure that, when for reasons of geographical isolation or socio-political disturbance members of the respective houses of Parliament who would otherwise be unable to, have a way to address the house and cast votes in it.


OFFICERS OF Parliament

Article 88: Chairman and deputy chairman of the House of Provinces.

  1. The Deputy Prime Minister shall be ex officio the Chairman of the House of Provinces
  2. The House of Provinces shall, as soon as may be, choose a member of the House to be Deputy Chairman thereof and, so often as the office of Deputy Chairman becomes vacant, the House shall choose another member to be Deputy Chairman thereof.


Article 89: Vacation and resignation of and removal from the office of Deputy Chairman.

  1. A member holding office as Deputy Chairman of the House of Provinces:
    1. shall vacate their office if they ceases to be a member of the House;
    2. may at any time, by writing under their hand addressed to the Chairman, resign their office; and
    3. may be removed from their office by a resolution of the House passed by a majority of all the then members of the House.


Article 90: Power of the Deputy Chairman or others to act as Chairman in the absence of the Chairman

  1. During the absence of the Chairman from any sitting of the House of Provinces the Deputy Chairman, or, if they are also absent, such person as may be determined by the rules of procedure of the House, or, if no such person is present, such other person as may be determined by the House, shall act as Chairman.


Article 91: The Chairman to sit over removals of the Deputy Chairman

  1. At any sitting of the House of Provinces, while any resolution for the removal of the Deputy Chairman from their office is under consideration, the Deputy Chairman, shall not, though they are present, preside, and the provisions of Article 90 shall apply in relation to every such sitting as they apply in relation to a sitting from which the Chairman, or, as the case may be, the Deputy Chairman, is absent.


Article 92: The Deputy chairman to sit over Motions of No Confidence and Impeachments

  1. At any sitting of the House of Provinces, while any resolution for the removal of any member of the Executive Council from office is under consideration, the Chairman shall not, though they are present, preside, and the provisions of Article 90 shall apply in relation to every such sitting as they apply in relation to a sitting from which the Chairman, or, as the case may be, the Deputy Chairman, is absent.


Article 93: The Speaker and Deputy Speaker of the House of Commons

  1. The House of Commons shall, as soon as may be, choose two members of the House to be respectively Speaker and Deputy Speaker thereof and, so often as the office of Speaker or Deputy Speaker becomes vacant, the House shall choose another member to be Speaker or Deputy Speaker, as the case may be.
    1. These members shall not be from the same political party


Article 94: Vacation and resignation of and removal from the office of Speaker and Deputy Speaker of the House of Commons.

  1. A member holding office as Speaker or Deputy Speaker of the House of Commons:
    1. shall vacate their office if they cease to be a member of the House;
    2. may at any time, by writing under their hand addressed, if such member is the Speaker, to the Deputy Speaker, and if such member is the Deputy Speaker, to the Speaker, resign their office; and
    3. may be removed from their office by a resolution of the House passed by a majority of all the then members of the House.


Article 95: Provisions for the Deputy Speaker or other people to act as the Speaker in their absence

  1. While the office of Speaker is vacant, the duties of the office shall be performed by the Deputy Speaker or, if the office of Deputy Speaker is also vacant, by such member of the House of Commons as the Prime Minister may appoint for the purpose.
  2. During the absence of the Speaker from any sitting of the House of Commons the Deputy Speaker or, if they are also absent, such person as may be determined by the rules of procedure of the House, or, if no such person is present, such other person as may be determined by the House, shall act as Speaker.


Article 96: Conflicts in removal of office of the Speaker or Deputy Speaker of the House of Commons.

  1. At any sitting of the House of Commons, while any resolution for the removal of the Speaker from their office is under consideration, the Speaker, or while any resolution for the removal of the Deputy Speaker from their office is under consideration, the Deputy Speaker, shall not, though they are present, preside, and the provisions of clause (2) of Article 95 shall apply in relation to every such sitting as they apply in relation to a sitting from which the Speaker, or, as the case may be, the Deputy Speaker, is absent.


Article 97: The Leader and Deputy Leader of the House of Lords

  1. The House of Lords shall, as soon as may be, choose two members of the House to be respectively Leader and Deputy Leader thereof and, so often as the office of Leader or Deputy Leader becomes vacant, the House shall choose another member to be Leader or Deputy Leader , as the case may be.


Article 98: Vacation and resignation of and removal from the office of Leader and Deputy Leader of the House of Lords.

  1. A member holding office as Leader or Deputy Leader of the House of Lords:
    1. shall vacate their office if they cease to be a member of the House;
    2. may at any time, by writing under their hand addressed, if such member is the Leader, to the Deputy Leader, and if such member is the Deputy Leader, to the Leader, resign their office; and
    3. may be removed from their office by a resolution of the House passed by a majority of all the then members of the House.


Article 99: Provisions for the Deputy Leader or other people to act as the Leader in their absence

  1. While the office of Leader is vacant, the duties of the office shall be performed by the Deputy Leader or, if the office of Deputy Leader is also vacant, by such member of the House of Lords as the Prime Minister may appoint for the purpose.
  2. During the absence of the Leader from any sitting of the House of Lords the Deputy Leader or, if they are also absent, such person as may be determined by the rules of procedure of the House, or, if no such person is present, such other person as may be determined by the House, shall act as Leader.


Article 100: Conflicts in removal of office of the Leader or Deputy Leader of the House of Lords.

  1. At any sitting of the House of Lords, while any resolution for the removal of the Leader from their office is under consideration, the Leader, or while any resolution for the removal of the Deputy Leader from their office is under consideration, the Deputy Leader, shall not, though they are present, preside, and the provisions of clause (2) of Article 99 shall apply in relation to every such sitting as they apply in relation to a sitting from which the Leader, or, as the case may be, the Deputy Leader, is absent.


Article 101: Secretariat of Parliament

  1. Each House of Parliament shall have a separate secretarial staff:
    1. Provided that nothing in this clause shall be construed as preventing the creation of posts common to any and all Houses of Parliament.
  2. Parliament may by law regulate the recruitment, and the conditions of service of persons appointed,


CONDUCT OF BUSINESS

Article 102: Oath of affirmation by members.

  1. Every member of any house of Parliament shall, before taking their seat, make a solemn oath or affirmation before the Monarch or some person appointed on their behalf.
    1. The form of which shall be as prescribed in the Third Schedule.


Article 103: Voting in the houses and quorum.

  1. Save other times as provided for by this constitution all votes in any house will be passed by a simple majority of voting members, other than the person presiding over the vote,
    1. Should there be a tie the person presiding should vote in a way as to continue a bills passage through the house.
  2. Every sitting of every house shall be valid, notwithstanding vacancy in the membership thereof, and all proceedings of Parliament are valid, notwithstanding it is later discovered that some person who had no standing in the seated house partook or voted in the houses business.
  3. The quorum to constitute a meeting of any house shall be one-tenth of the houses total membership.
  4. Should at any point the house not be at quorum it is the duty of the presiding officer to adjourn the house until such a time as quorocracy is restored.


DISQUALIFICATION OF MEMBERS

Article 104: Vacation of seats.

  1. No person may be a member of more than one house of Parliament at any one time.
  2. No person may be a member of the House of Commons or House of Lords and a State legislature or executive together at any one time.
  3. Provided that a person become of the subject of any of the terms of disqualification in Article 105 whilst in office their seat shall become vacant.
  4. A person may, under their own hand, write a letter to the queen resigning from office immediately to make their seat vacant.
  5. Parliament may make laws for the recall of any member of the House of Commons or the House of Provinces by their own constituents.
  6. A person who has, without permission from their house, missed forty consecutive days of Parliament where their house was sitting shall be removed from office.
  7. A person who, elected under a party banner, resigns from said party shall have their seat become vacant.
  8. A member of the House of Lords may, at the suggestion of an independent panel, be removed from the house for breaking the law or bringing the country into disrepute.
  9. Any seat vacated from the House of Commons or House of Provinces shall, at the earliest possible convenience, be filled in a by-election mirroring the rules of normal election to the house.


Article 105: Disqualification for membership.

  1. A person will be disqualified from holding any elected public office if they:
    1. hold any other office of a foreign state;
    2. is, by a court of law, declared to be unfit for office due to being of unsound mind;
    3. is or has ever been insolvent;
    4. has been impeached from any office in the United Kingdom; or
    5. is so disqualified by any other law made by Parliament.


POWERS, PRIVILEGES AND IMMUNITIES OF Parliament AND ITS MEMBERS

Article 106: Powers, Privileges and Immunities of Parliament and its Members

  1. Subject to the provisions of the constitution and the rules and standing orders of Parliament no member shall be held liable in any court for anything they say in Parliament in session as long as it is not personal slander.
  2. No one may be held liable for any vote, paper, report or speach they legitimately perform in a sitting Parliament, in a court of law.


LEGISLATIVE PROCEDURE

Article 107: Provisions for the introduction and passing of bills.

  1. Save for the introduction of money bills, as in the provisions of Article 109, a bill may originate in any house of Parliament.
  2. Save for the provisions of Articles 108 and 109, a bill is only deemed to have passed if it has been approved, with or without amendments by the Houses of Commons and Provinces and:
    1. has been approved with or without amendments by the House of Lords; or
    2. has not been approved by the lords for over a period of three hundred and sixty five days without amendment from the Commons or Provinces in that time.
  3. A Bill pending in Parliament shall not lapse by reason of the prorogation of the Houses.
  4. A Bill passed by the House of Commons but not agreed by Parliament before the lapse of a Parliamentary term shall be scrapped.


Article 108: Joint sittings of Parliament in relation to bills.

  1. The Monarch may, on the advice of the Executive Council, call a joint sitting of Parliament whereby a bill is heard and voted on collectively if:
    1. A bill has been returned to the house it originated from twice
    2. Six or more months have elapsed from when one house passed the bill and it has not been read in both the other houses.
  2. All bills passed by a joint sitting are binding acts, given the full weight of the law as if they were passed according to Article 107.
  3. When this article is invoked the vote of a Member of the House of Provinces shall be weighted seven times the vote of a member of the House of Lords and seven times the vote of a Member of the House of Commons.


Article 109: Special procedure for money bills.

  1. All money bills will first be submitted to all Houses of Parliament simultaneously by the Prime Minister on behalf of the Executive Council.
  2. The Houses shall consider it and transmit any amendments agreed by the respective houses to the Executive Council within fourteen days of receiving the bill.
  3. The Executive Council may then accept or reject any or all of the proposed amendments or make further amendments of their own and pass the bill in a vote amongst themselves.
    1. Any provisions in law which require certain levels of state spending cannot be overturned in a money bill passed in this way.
    2. Any provisions that affect funding of individual provinces must be approved by the provincial legislatures affected.
    3. Any provisions in law which affect levels of taxation passed in Parliament cannot be changed in this way.
  4. Nothing in this article shall prevent Parliament, if it so desires, from enacting laws which would set out minimum funding commitments to areas of state spending, from setting out minimum or maximum taxation limits or from requiring the state to invest in infrastructure projects.


Article 110: Definition of “Money Bills”.

  1. For the purposes of this chapter a bill shall only be deemed a money bill if it deals solely with the following:
    1. the imposition, abolition, remission, alteration or regulation of any tax;
    2. the regulation of the borrowing of money or the giving of any guarantee by the Government of the United Kingdom, or the amendment of the law with respect to any financial obligations undertaken or to be undertaken by the Government of the United Kingdom;
    3. the custody of the Consolidated Fund or the Contingency Fund of the United Kingdom, the payment of moneys into or the withdrawal of moneys from any such Fund;
    4. the appropriation of moneys out of the Consolidated Fund of the United Kingdom;
    5. the declaring of any expenditure to be expenditure charged on the Consolidated Fund of the United Kingdom or the increasing of the amount of any such expenditure;
    6. the receipt of money on account of the Consolidated Fund of the United Kingdom or the public account of the United Kingdom or the custody or issue of such money or the audit of the accounts of the Union or of a Province ; or
    7. any matter incidental to any of the matters specified in sub-clauses (a) to (f).
  2. A Bill shall not be deemed to be a Money Bill by reason only that it provides for the imposition of fines or other pecuniary penalties, or for the demand or payment of fees for licences or fees for services rendered, or by reason that it provides for the imposition, abolition, remission, alteration or regulation of any tax by any local authority or body for local purposes.
  3. If any question arises whether a Bill is a Money Bill or not, the decision of the Speaker of the House of the People thereon shall be final.




PROCEDURE GENERALLY

Article 111: Oversight of State spending

  1. At the start of every financial year the Prime Minister shall cause to appear before a joint sitting of Parliament a statement of the spending and revenue of the state for the previous financial year and predictions for the current one as well as publiclicly publishing said data.
    1. This sessions is simply to inform members of Parliament and no amendments or votes shall occur during this reading,
    2. That is not to say that Parliament may not legislate based on the information from the reading however.


Article 112: Rules of procedure.

  1. Each House of Parliament may make rules for regulating, subject to the provisions of this Constitution, its procedure and the conduct of its business.
  2. Until rules are made under clause (1), the rules of procedure and standing orders in force immediately before the commencement of this Constitution with respect to the Legislature of the United Kingdom shall have effect in relation to Parliament subject to such modifications and adaptations as may be made therein by the Chairman of the House of Provinces, the Leader of the House of Lords or the Speaker of the House of Commons, as the case may be.
    1. The House of Provinces shall follow the rules of the House of Commons initially.
  3. The Prime Minister, after consultation with the Chairman of the House of Provinces and the Speaker of the House of Commons, may make rules as to the procedure with respect to joint sittings of, and communications between, the two Houses.
  4. At a joint sitting of the three Houses the Speaker of the House of Commons, or in their absence such person as may be determined by rules of procedure made under clause (3), shall preside


Article 113: Restriction of discussion in Parliament.

  1. No discussion as to the conduct or ruling of any judge with the authority of the High Court or Supreme Court may be called into question inside Parliament.


Article 114: Courts right to inquire into Parliamentary proceedings.

  1. The validity of any proceedings in Parliament shall not be called in question on the ground of any alleged irregularity of procedure.
  2. No officer or member of Parliament in whom powers are vested by or under this Constitution for regulating procedure or the conduct of business, or for maintaining order, in Parliament shall be subject to the jurisdiction of any court in respect of the exercise by him of those powers.


Article 115: Parliament's right to scrutinise the executive.

  1. Parliament or any house thereof may, at any time, issue a writ of summons ordering any member of the Executive Council to appear before the issuing house(s) to be scrutinised by the house.
  2. Upon the receipt of such a writ the MEC is required to appear before the issuing authority within 14 days.


CHAPTER III: - LEGISLATIVE AUTHORITY OF THE PRIME MINISTER

Article 116: Power of the Prime Minister to enact ordinances in a crisis.

  1. If at any time, except when the Executive Council is in session, the Prime Minister is satisfied that circumstances exist which render it necessary for them to take immediate action, they may promulgate such Ordinances as the circumstances appear to them to require.
    1. When the Executive Council is in session this power shall lie with them.
  2. An Ordinance promulgated under this article shall have the same force and effect as an Act of Parliament, but every such Ordinance:
    1. shall be laid before all Houses of Parliament and shall cease to operate at the expiration of six weeks from the reassembly of Parliament, or, if before the expiration of that period resolutions disapproving it are passed by all Houses, upon the passing of the third of those resolutions; and
    2. may be withdrawn at any time by the President.
  3. If and so far as an Ordinance under this article makes any provision which Parliament would not under this Constitution be competent to enact, it shall be void.
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CHAPTER IV: - THE UNION JUDICIARY

Article 117: The Supreme Court.

  1. There shall be a Supreme Court of the United Kingdom consisting of a Chief Justice of the United Kingdom, a Deputy Chief Justice of the United Kingdom and no more than the equivalent of thirteen full time other judges at any one time.
  2. Every judge of the Supreme Court shall be appointed by the Monarch by a royal warrant at the recommendation of the recommendation of both the existing judges of the Supreme Court and the Executive Council.
  3. The terms of office of each judge are indefinite, until such time that they retire or become incapable of carrying out their duties as determined by the court.
  4. Parliament may legislate for conditions of membership for the Supreme Court as it likes within the constitution.
  5. The Court may refuse to hear any case out of hand it so wishes if it determines that there is no basis for a legal challenge.
    1. Any lower court may refer any issue to the Supreme Court and in these cases the Supreme Court must hear the case.


Article 118: Jurisdiction of the Supreme Court

  1. The Supreme Court is the ultimate court in the United Kingdom, it has ultimate responsibility for the enforcement of all laws and the constitution.
  2. The primary responsibility of the Supreme Court is to:
    1. Determine the constitutionality of all primary and secondary legislation, and if it decides, to repeal unconstitutional legislation.
    2. Enforce international treaties within the United Kingdom
    3. To resolve disputes between:
      1. The government of the United Kingdom and one or more of its Provinces;
      2. The government of the United Kingdom and any one or more Provinces on one side and one or more on another side; or
      3. Two or more Provinces.


Article 119: Auxiliary powers of the Supreme Court

  1. Parliament may by law make provision for conferring upon the Supreme Court such supplemental powers not inconsistent with any of the provisions of this Constitution as may appear to be necessary or desirable for the purpose of enabling the Court more effectively to exercise the jurisdiction conferred upon it by or under this Constitution.


Article 120: Authority of the Supreme Court

  1. The law declared by the Supreme Court shall be binding on all courts within the territory of the United Kingdom.
  2. The Supreme Court in the exercise of its jurisdiction may pass such decree or make such order as is necessary for doing complete justice in any cause or matter pending before it, and any decree so passed or order so made shall be enforceable throughout the territory of the United Kingdom in such manner as may be prescribed by or under any law made by Parliament.
  3. Subject to the provisions of any law made in this behalf by Parliament, the Supreme Court shall, as respects the whole of the territory of the United Kingdom, have all and every power to make any order for the purpose of securing the attendance of any person, the discovery or production of any documents, or the investigation or punishment of any contempt of itself.


Article 121: Rules of the Court.

  1. Subject to the provisions of any law made by Parliament, the Supreme Court may from time to time make rules for regulating generally the practice and procedure of the Court and all courts within the United Kingdom including:
    1. rules as to the persons practising before the Court;
    2. rules as to the procedure for hearing appeals and other matters pertaining to appeals including the time within which appeals to the Court are to be entered;
    3. rules as to the proceedings in the Court for the enforcement of any of the rights conferred by Part III;
    4. rules as to the conditions subject to which any judgment pronounced or order made by the Court may be reviewed and the procedure for such review including the time within which applications to the Court for such review are to be entered;
    5. rules as to the costs of and incidental to any proceedings in the Court and as to the fees to be charged in respect of proceedings therein;
    6. rules as to the granting of bail;
    7. rules as to stay of proceedings;
    8. rules providing for the summary determination of any appeal which appears to the Court to be frivolous or vexatious or brought for the purpose of delay;
    9. Rules as to the minimum number of judges required to hear a case, provided that there are always at least seven.
  2. No judgment shall be delivered by the Supreme Court save in open Court.
  3. No judgment and no such opinion shall be delivered by the Supreme Court save with the concurrence of a majority of the Judges present at the hearing of the case, but nothing in this clause shall be deemed to prevent a Judge who does not concur from delivering a dissenting judgment or opinion


Article 122: Lesser Courts.

  1. Parliament may designate lower courts to hear more mundane matters by law providing that:
    1. These lower courts must follow the example of the Supreme Court in making legislation
    2. There is a hierarchy which ends at the Supreme Court.
    3. There is a system of appeals before a case is heard at the Supreme Court.
    4. The appointment of Judges to these courts shall be done in a manner that the Supreme or High courts may set out.


CHAPTER V: - COMPTROLLER AND AUDITOR-GENERAL OF THE UNITED KINGDOM

Article 123: COMPTROLLER AND AUDITOR-GENERAL OF THE UNITED KINGDOM

  1. There shall be a Comptroller and Auditor General of the United Kingdom who shall be appointed by the Monarch at the suggestion of the Executive Council by royal warrant.
  2. The Comptroller and Auditor-General shall not be eligible for further office either under the Government of the United Kingdom or under the Government of any Province after they have ceased to hold their office.
  3. The Comptroller and Auditor-General shall perform such duties and exercise such powers in relation to the accounts of the Union and of the Provinces and of any other authority or body as may be prescribed by or under any law made by Parliament.
  4. The reports of the Comptroller and Auditor General of the United Kingdom relating to the accounts of the Union shall be submitted to the Prime Minister, who shall cause them to be laid before each House of Parliament.
  5. The reports of the Comptroller and Auditor General of the United Kingdom relating to the accounts of a Province shall be submitted to the First Minister of the Province, who shall cause them to be laid before the Legislature of the Province.




PART VI: THE PROVINCES

CHAPTER I: - THE EXECUTIVE

THE FIRST MINISTER AND DEPUTY FIRST MINISTER

Article 124: The First Minister of Province

  1. Each province shall have a First Minister


Article 125: Appointment of the First Minister.

  1. The First Minister shall be appointed by the Monarch from among the members of the Provincial Legislature and shall normally be the person who commands the confidence of the house.


Article 126: Executive power of the Province

  1. The executive power of the Province shall be vested in the First Minister thereof and shall be exercised by them either directly or by subordinate officers of them in accordance to this constitution.
  2. Nothing in this article shall:
    1. be deemed to transfer to the First Minister any functions conferred by any existing law on any other authority; or
    2. prevent Parliament or the Legislature of the Province from conferring by law functions on any authority subordinate to the First Minister.


Article 127: Term of office of the First Minister.

  1. The First Minister shall continue to serve as long as they command the confidence of the provincial legislature and continue to be a member of said legislature.


Article 128: Extent of Executive power of a Province.

  1. Subject to the provisions of this Constitution, the executive power of a Province shall extend to the matters with respect to which the Legislature of the Province has power to make laws. Provided that in any matter with respect to which the Legislature of a Province and Parliament have power to make laws, the executive power of the Province shall be subject to, and limited by, the executive power expressly conferred by this Constitution or by any law made by Parliament upon the Union or authorities thereof.


Article 129: The Deputy First Minister.

  1. There shall be a Deputy First Minister appointed by the First Minister from the members of the Provincial legislature.
  2. The Deputy First Minister shall stand in for the First Minister should the first minister be unable to act for any reason.


THE FIRST PROVINCIAL COUNCIL

Article 130: Council of Provincial Ministers.

  1. The First Minister may appoint Ministers from among the members of the provincial Legislature.
  2. Ministers appointed under this article shall:
    1. cease to be a Minister should they cease to be a member of the legislature
    2. be removed from office should the Legislature at any time determine that it has no confidence in the First Minister
    3. serve at the pleasure of the First Minister
    4. have the right to resign at any time knowing that upon resignation they shall immediately cease to be a minister.


THE ADVOCATE GENERAL FOR THE PROVINCE

Article 131: The Advocate General

  1. There shall be a Advocate General for every Province.
  2. The Advocate General shall be appointed by the Monarch, on the advice of the First Minister after having consulted with the Attorney General.
  3. The Advocate General shall be an ex officio member of the First Provincial Council


Article 132: Duties of the Advocate General.

  1. It shall be the duty of the Advocate-General to give advice to the Government of the Province upon such legal matters, and to perform such other duties of a legal character, as may from time to time be referred or assigned to him by the First Minister, and to discharge the functions conferred on him by or under this Constitution or any other law for the time being in force.


CONDUCT OF GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

Article 133: Conduct of the business of the government of a Province.

  1. All executive action of the government of a Province shall be expressed to be taken out by the Monarch at the advice of the First Minister.




CHAPTER II: - THE PROVINCIAL LEGISLATURE

DEFINITION

Article 134: Definition of Parliament

  1. For the purpose of this chapter “Parliament” shall be taken to mean the Parliament of the United Kingdom.
    1. Any reference to the Legislature of a Province shall be cited as the “Provincial Parliament”


GENERAL

Article 135: The constitution of a Provincial Legislature.

  1. Each province as prescribed in the First Schedule shall have its own legislature which shall consist of one house.
  2. This house shall be called the “Provincial Parliament for [province]”


Article 136: Creation or dissolution of subservient legislatures within a Province.

  1. Any provincial legislature may, at any time, by law create or destroy additional legislative bodies which exist only wholly within its borders, who’s composition and method of election may be determined by the Province.
  2. Nothing in this article shall prevent Parliament from legislating conditions on which additional legislative entities must run or from overturning legislation made according to paragraph (1).


Article 137: Composition of Provincial Parliaments

  1. The Provincial Parliament is to consist of at a minimum three times the number of representatives the Province has in Parliament and at a maximum six times that amount.
  2. Members of each Provincial Parliament shall be returned under the Additional Member system of proportional representation with as many regional seats as constituency seats.
    1. The boundaries for which shall be set by the boundary commission.
  3. Each provincial Parliament is free to determine the number of members returned each general election provided that:
    1. it meets the conditions of paragraph (1); and
    2. such a change shall only take force after the next general election.


Article 138: Duration of Provincial Parliaments.

  1. Every Provincial Parliament of every Province shall, unless sooner dissolved, continue for a period of one thousand four hundred and sixty days from the appointed date of its first meeting and no longer.
    1. Unless sub paragraph (3a) of Article 82 has been triggered in which case the term of the Provincial Parliament shall continue as long as the term of the House of Commons does.


Article 139: Qualification for membership of Provincial Legislatures.

  1. A person shall not be qualified to be chosen to fill a seat in the Provincial legislature unless they:
    1. meet the requirements laid out in Article 83;
    2. are eligible to vote for such position and
    3. fulfill any other criteria that the province may decide.
  2. A Province may decide to expand suffrage in elections solely within its boundaries beyond that which is provided by Article 83 provided that it passes such legislation by a majority of two-thirds of its membership.


Article 140: Sessions of the Provincial Legislature, prorogation and dissolution.

  1. The Monarch shall from time to time summon the Provincial Legislature to meet at such time and place as they thinks fit, but six months shall not intervene between its last sitting in one session and the date appointed for its first sitting in the next session.
  2. The Monarch may from time to time:
    1. prorogue the house at the recommendation of the First Minister;
    2. dissolve the House when required by law or constitutionally.


OFFICERS OF THE PROVINCIAL LEGISLATURE

Article 141: The Presiding Officer and Deputy Presiding Officer

  1. Each Provincial Parliament shall have a Presiding Officer and a Deputy Presiding Officer.


Article 142: Election of the Presiding Officer or their Deputy

  1. Immediately following a General election or the opening of a vacancy the members of the Provincial Parliament shall elect from amongst themselves via an exhaustive ballot a Presiding Officer and a Deputy Presiding Officer.


Article 143: Term of the Presiding Officer and their Deputy.

  1. The Presiding Officer shall serve until the election of a new Presiding Officer in accordance to Article 142 unless they:
    1. previously resign;
    2. ceases to be a member of the Parliament; or
    3. Is removed by a resolution of Parliament.
  2. Section (1) shall apply equally to the Deputy Presiding Officer.


Article 144: Ability of the Deputy Presiding officer, or any other person, to act as the Presiding Officer.

  1. While the office of Presiding Officer is vacant, the duties of the office shall be performed by the Deputy Presiding Officer or, if the office of Deputy Presiding Officer is also vacant, by such member of the Parliament as the Prime Minister may appoint for the purpose.
  2. During the absence of the Presiding Officer from any sitting of the Parliament the Deputy Presiding Officer or, if they are also absent, such person as may be determined by the rules of procedure of the Parliament, or, if no such person is present, such other person as may be determined by the Parliament, shall act as Presiding Officer.


Article 145: Conflict of interest of the Presiding Officer or Deputy Presiding Officer in sitting over a Motion of No Confidence

  1. At any sitting of the Parliament, while any resolution for the removal of the Presiding Officer from their office is under consideration, the Presiding Officer, or while any resolution for the removal of the Deputy Presiding Officer, from their office is under consideration, the Deputy Presiding Officer, shall not, though they are present, preside, and the provisions of clause (2) of Article 144 shall apply in relation to every such sitting as they apply in relation to a sitting from which the Presiding Officer or, as the case may be, the Deputy Presiding Officer, is absent.


Article 146: Clerk of the Parliament

  1. There shall be a Clerk of every Provincial Parliament
  2. Such person shall be appointed in the same manner as set out in Article 101.


CONDUCT OF BUSINESS

Article 147: Oath or affirmation by Members

  1. Every member of the Provincial Parliament shall, before taking their seat, make and subscribe before the Monarch, or some person appointed in that behalf by him, an oath or affirmation according to the form set out for the purpose in the Third Schedule


Article 148: Voting in the Provincial Parliament.

  1. Save as otherwise provided in this Constitution, or any constitution a Province may place upon itself, all questions at any sitting of a Provincial Parliament shall be determined by a majority of votes of the members present and voting, other than the Presiding Officer, or person acting as such.
    1. The Presiding Officer, or person acting as such, shall not vote in the first instance, but shall have and exercise a casting vote in the case of an equality of votes.
  2. A Provincial Parliament shall have power to act notwithstanding any vacancy in the membership thereof, and any proceedings in the Provincial Legislature shall be valid notwithstanding that it is discovered subsequently that some person who was not entitled so to do sat or voted or otherwise took part in the proceedings.
  3. The quorum to constitute a meeting of the Provincial Parliament shall be one-tenth of the houses total membership.
  4. Should at any point the house not be at quorum it is the duty of the presiding officer to adjourn the house until such a time as quorocracy is restored.




DISQUALIFICATION OF MEMBERS

Article 149: Vacation of Seats

  1. No person shall be a member for more than one Provincial Parliament.
  2. If a person becomes subject to any of the disqualifications mentioned in Article 150 their seat shall become vacant.
  3. A person may, under their own hand, write a letter to the queen resigning from office immediately to make their seat vacant.
  4. A Provincial Parliament may make laws for the recall of any member of itself by their own constituents.
  5. A person who has, without permission from the house, missed forty consecutive days of Parliament where their house was sitting shall be removed from office.
  6. A person who, elected under a party banner, resigns from said party shall have their seat become vacant.


Article 150: Disqualification for Membership.

  1. A member is disqualified from being a member of a Provincial Parliament if they:
    1. hold any other office of a foreign state;
    2. are, by a court of law, declared to be unfit for office due to being of unsound mind;
    3. are or has ever been insolvent;
    4. have been impeached from any office in the United Kingdom; or
    5. are so disqualified by any other law made by Parliament.


POWERS, PRIVILEGES AND IMMUNITIES OF PROVINCIAL LEGISLATURES AND THEIR MEMBERS

Article 151: Powers, Privileges and Immunities of Provincial Parliaments and its Members

  1. Subject to the provisions of the constitution and the rules and standing orders of the Provincial Parliament no member shall be held liable in any court for anything they say in the Provincial Parliament in session as long as it is not personal slander.
  2. No one may be held liable for any vote, paper, report or speach they legitimately perform in a sitting the Provincial Parliament , in a court of law.


LEGISLATIVE PROCEDURE

Article 152: Provisions for the introduction and passing of bills.

  1. A Bill pending in the Legislature of a Province shall not lapse by reason of the prorogation of the House or Houses thereof.


Article 153: Assent to Bills.

  1. When a bill has been passed by the Provincial Parliament of a Province it shall be presented to the Monarch who shall either assent to the bill, making it law, or withhold assent.
    1. The Monarch may only withhold assent at the advice of the Executive Council.


PROCEDURE GENERALLY

Article 154: Oversight of Provincial spending

  1. 1. At the start of every financial year the First Minister shall cause to appear before a sitting of the Provincial Parliament a statement of the spending and revenue of the Province for the previous financial year and predictions for the current one as well as publicly publishing said data.
    1. a. This sessions is simply to inform members of the Provincial Parliament and no amendments or votes shall occur during this reading,
    2. b. That is not to say that the Provincial Parliament may not legislate based on the information from the reading however.


Article 155: Rules of procedure.

  1. Each Provincial Parliament may make rules for regulating, subject to the provisions of this Constitution, its procedure and the conduct of its business.
  2. Until rules are made under clause (1), the rules of procedure and standing orders in force immediately before the commencement of this Constitution with respect to the House of Commons shall have effect in relation to every Provincial Parliament subject to such modifications and adaptations as may be made therein by the Presiding Officer of each respective Provincial Parliament.


Article 156: Restriction of discussion in Parliament.

  1. No discussion as to the conduct or ruling of any judge with the authority of the High Court or Supreme Court may be called into question inside and Provincial Legislature.


Article 157: Courts right to inquire into Parliamentary proceedings.

  1. The validity of any proceedings in any Provincial Parliament shall not be called in question on the ground of any alleged irregularity of procedure.
  2. No officer or member of any Provincial Parliament in whom powers are vested by or under this Constitution for regulating procedure or the conduct of business, or for maintaining order, in said Provincial Parliament shall be subject to the jurisdiction of any court in respect of the exercise by him of those powers.


Article 158: Parliament's right to scrutinise the executive.

  1. Any Provincial Parliament may, at any time, issue a writ of summons ordering any member of the First Provincial Council to appear before them to be scrutinised by the house.
  2. Upon the receipt of such a writ the Minister is required to appear before the issuing authority within 14 days.
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CHAPTER III: - HIGH COURTS IN THE PROVINCE

Article 159: High Court for the Province.

  1. Each Province shall have a High Court.


Article 160: High Court as a Court of record.

  1. Every High Court shall be a court of record and shall have all the powers of such a court including the power to punish for contempt of itself.


Article 161: Constitution of the High Court

  1. Every High Court shall consist of a President of the High Court and as many as ten full time equivalent other judges.
  2. Every judge of the High court shall be appointed by the Monarch by a royal warrant at the recommendation of the recommendation of both the Supreme Court of the and the Executive Council.
  3. The terms of office of each judge are indefinite, until such time that they retire or become incapable of carrying out their duties as determined by the court.
  4. Parliament may legislate for conditions of membership for the High court as it likes within the constitution.
  5. The Court may refuse to hear any case out of hand it so wishes if it determines that there is no basis for a legal challenge.
    1. Any lower court may refer any issue to the High Court and in these cases the High Court must hear the case.


Article 162: Appointment of acting President of the High Court.

  1. When the office of President of a High Court is vacant or when any such President is, by reason of absence or otherwise, unable to perform the duties of their office, the duties of the office shall be performed by such one of the other Judges of the Court as the Chief Justice of the United Kingdom may appoint for the purpose.


Article 163: Jurisdiction of the High Court.

  1. The High Court of a Province is the Supreme Court of that province.
  2. The High Court of a Province may hear all cases of law except those which are matters of the Constitution of the United Kingdom or those which happened outside of the Province they are in.


Article 164: Authority of the High Court

  1. The law declared by the High Court shall be binding on all courts within the territory of the Province they are in.
  2. A High Court in the exercise of its jurisdiction may pass such decree or make such order as is necessary for doing complete justice in any cause or matter pending before it, and any decree so passed or order so made shall be enforceable throughout the territory of the United Kingdom in such manner as may be prescribed by or under any law made by Parliament.
  3. Subject to the provisions of any law made in this behalf by Parliament, the High Court shall, as respects the whole of the territory of the United Kingdom, have all and every power to make any order for the purpose of securing the attendance of any person, the discovery or production of any documents, or the investigation or punishment of any contempt of itself.


Article 165: Rules of the Court.

  1. Subject to the provisions of any law made by Parliament and any rules imposed by the Supreme Court, the High Court may from time to time make rules for regulating generally the practice and procedure of the Courts within the Province including:
    1. rules as to the persons practising before the Court;
    2. rules as to the procedure for hearing appeals and other matters pertaining to appeals including the time within which appeals to the Court are to be entered;
    3. rules as to the proceedings in the Court for the enforcement of any of the rights conferred by Part III;
    4. rules as to the conditions subject to which any judgment pronounced or order made by the Court may be reviewed and the procedure for such review including the time within which applications to the Court for such review are to be entered;
    5. rules as to the costs of and incidental to any proceedings in the Court and as to the fees to be charged in respect of proceedings therein;
    6. rules as to the granting of bail;
    7. rules as to stay of proceedings;
    8. rules providing for the summary determination of any appeal which appears to the Court to be frivolous or vexatious or brought for the purpose of delay;
    9. Rules as to the minimum number of judges required to hear a case, provided that there are always at least one.
  2. No judgment shall be delivered by the High Court save in open Court.
  3. No judgment and no such opinion shall be delivered by the High Court save with the concurrence of a majority of the Judges present at the hearing of the case, but nothing in this clause shall be deemed to prevent a Judge who does not concur from delivering a dissenting judgment or opinion


Article 166: Provision for Parliament to extend the authority of any High Court to include a Crown Territory.

  1. Parliament may by law extend the jurisdiction of a High Court to, or exclude the jurisdiction of a High Court from, any Crown territory.
  2. Where the High Court of a Province exercises jurisdiction in relation to a Crown territory, nothing in this Constitution shall be construed as empowering the Legislature of the Province to increase, restrict or abolish that jurisdiction.


CHAPTER IV: - SUBORDINATE COURTS

Article 167: Establishment of Subordinate Courts.

  1. Any Provincial Legislature may by law establish courts subordinate to the High Court within their province.
  2. Parliament may, by law, require the establishment of certain courts subordinate to the High Court of a Province and define the types of cases these courts shall handle.


Article 168: Authority of Subordinate Courts.

  1. The Provincial Legislature may dictate which cases may be heard before different subordinate courts.
  2. All rulings made in such a court are binding on all courts of equal and lesser authority but may be overturned on appeal to the High Court or the Supreme Court.


Article 169: Appointments to Subordinate Courts.

  1. Every judge of a Subordinate Court shall be appointed by the Monarch by a royal warrant at the recommendation of the recommendation of the High Court of that Province.
  2. The High Court and the Supreme Court may set rules as to who is eligible to be appointed a Judge of a Subordinate Court as long as such rules do not contradict this constitution or any law passed by Parliament.




PART VII: THE CROWN TERRITORIES

Article 170: Administration of Crown Territories.

  1. Save as otherwise provided for in law all Crown Territories shall be administered by the Monarch or any other such person as the Monarch may appoint to administer the territory on their behalf.
  2. The person appointed by the Monarch should not have the responsibility of elected public office anywhere within the United Kingdom.


Article 171: Legislature of a Crown Territory.

  1. All Crown Territories are under the full legislative competence of Parliament, save for when Parliament decided by law to create a legislative assembly for the Territory.
  2. Any such law as referred to in clause (1) shall not be taken to be an amendment to this constitution.


Article 172: High Courts in Crown Territories.

  1. Parliament may by law constitute a High Court for a Crown Territory or declare any court in any such territory to be a High Court for all or any of the purposes of this Constitution.


PART VIII: COUNTIES

Article 173: The Counties.

  1. There shall be Counties as specified in the Second Schedule of this constitution.
  2. Each County shall exist wholly in the area of a single Province


Article 174: Counties in a Unitary Province.

  1. Where a County is the only county within a Province the Counties functions shall be administered by the provincial legislature.


Article 175: Constitution of County Councils.

  1. Save as otherwise provided for in Article 174, every County shall have a County Council.
  2. The membership of this Council shall be elected in a way to be decided by the Province.
  3. Initially the election method shall be that of multi-member First Past the Post constituencies as determined by the boundary commission.


Article 176: Eligibility of election to a County Council.

  1. The eligibility requirements to be elected to a County Council shall be as determined by the Province that the County resides.
  2. Initially the requirements shall be the same as those for Provincial candidature.


Article 177: Duration of Councils.

  1. Each Council, unless otherwise dissolved before, shall continue for one thousand, eight hundred and twenty-five days from the appointed date of their designated first meeting and no later.


Article 178: Power, Authority and Responsibility of County Councils.

  1. Subject to the Constitution and the laws of Parliament, the Provincial Legislatures my, by law, endow upon the County Councils such powers as they need to:
    1. fully carry out their duties as required by the Sixth Schedule;
    2. ensure the economic growth and social justice of their County; and
    3. collect funds, in the way of taxes to fund the activities of these councils.


Article 179: Power to establish subordinate Councils.

  1. Subject to any conditions established by law, a County Council may establish by order, smaller subservient Councils to fulfill the duty of the County Council in a given area.
  2. The activity of these smaller Councils is the responsibility of the County Council and the County Council shall have legal liability for the decisions of Councils established under this article.


PART IX: RELATIONS BETWEEN THE REGIONS AND THE UNION

CHAPTER I: - LEGISLATIVE RELATIONS

Article 180: Extent of laws made by Parliament and Provincial Legislatures.

  1. Subject to the provisions of this Constitution, Parliament may make laws for the whole or any part of the territory of the United Kingdom, and the Legislature of a Province may make laws for the whole or any part of the Province.
  2. No law made by Parliament shall be deemed to be invalid on the ground that it would have extra-territorial operation.


Article 181: Subject matter of laws enacted by Parliament and the Legislatures of a Province.

  1. Notwithstanding anything in clauses (2) and (3), Parliament has exclusive power to make laws with respect to any of the matters enumerated in List I in the Fifth Schedule (in this Constitution referred to as the “Union List”).
  2. Notwithstanding anything in clause (3), Parliament, and, subject to clause (1), the Legislature of any Province also, have power to make laws with respect to any of the matters enumerated in List III in the Fifth Schedule (in this Constitution referred to as the “Concurrent List”).
  3. Subject to clauses (1) and (2), the Legislature of any Province has exclusive power to make laws for such Province or any part thereof with respect to any of the matters enumerated in List II in the Fifth Schedule (in this Constitution referred to as the “Provinces List”).
  4. Parliament has power to make laws with respect to any matter for any part of the territory of the United Kingdom not included in a Province notwithstanding that such matter is a matter enumerated in the Provinces List.


Article 182: Residuary powers of Legislation.

  1. Parliament has exclusive power to make any law with respect to any matter not enumerated in the Concurrent List or Province List.
  2. Such power shall include the power of making any law imposing a tax not mentioned in either of those Lists.


Article 183: Power of Parliament to legislate in reserved business.

  1. Notwithstanding anything in the foregoing provisions of this chapter, Parliament may legislate for any matter enumerated in the Provinces List if:
    1. The affected Provinces give consent for Parliament to do so by a motion in their legislature; or
    2. A majority of two-thirds of the members of the House of Provinces supports the bill.


Article 184: Power to legislate within a state of emergency.

  1. Notwithstanding anything in this Chapter, Parliament shall, in a state of emergency, have the power to legislate on any matter on the Provinces List for the whole or any part of the United Kingdom.
  2. Laws made in accordance to this article shall have effect only until the end of a period of one hundred and eighty-two days from the end of a state of emergency, unless sooner repealed.


Article 185: Inconsistency between laws made by Parliament under Articles 183 and 184 and laws made by the Legislatures of Provinces.

  1. Nothing in Articles 183 and 184 shall restrict the power of the Legislature of a Province to make any law which under this Constitution it has power to make, but if any provision of a law made by the Legislature of a Province is repugnant to any provision of a law made by Parliament which Parliament has under either of the said articles power to make, the law made by Parliament, whether passed before or after the law made by the Legislature of the Province, shall prevail, and the law made by the Legislature of the Province shall to the extent of the repugnancy, but so long only as the law made by Parliament continues to have effect, be inoperative.


Article 186: Legislation for giving effect to international agreements.

  1. Notwithstanding anything in the foregoing provisions of this Chapter, Parliament has power to make any law for the whole or any part of the territory of the United Kingdom for implementing any treaty, agreement or convention with any other country or countries or any decision made at any international conference, association or other body.


Article 187: Incompatibility of laws passed by Parliament and Provincial Legislatures.

  1. If any provision of a law made by the Legislature of a Province is repugnant to any provision of a law made by Parliament which Parliament is competent to enact, or to any provision of an existing law with respect to one of the matters enumerated in the Concurrent List, then, subject to the provisions of clause (2), the law made by Parliament, whether passed before or after the law made by the Legislature of such Province, or, as the case may be, the existing law, shall prevail and the law made by the Legislature of the Province shall, to the extent of the repugnancy, be void.
  2. Where a law made by the Legislature of a Province with respect to one of the matters enumerated in the Concurrent List contains any provision repugnant to the provisions of an earlier law made by Parliament or an existing law with respect to that matter, then, the law so made by the Legislature of such Province shall, if it has been reserved for the consideration of the Executive Council and has received their assent, prevail in that Province:
    1. Provided that nothing in this clause shall prevent Parliament from enacting at any time any law with respect to the same matter including a law adding to, amending, varying or repealing the law so made by the Legislature of the Province.




CHAPTER II: - ADMINISTRATIVE RELATIONS

Article 188: Obligations of the Provinces and the Union.

  1. The executive power of every Province shall be so exercised as to ensure compliance with the laws made by Parliament and any existing laws which apply in that Province, and the executive power of the Union shall extend to the giving of such directions to a Province as may appear to the Government of the United Kingdom to be necessary for that purpose.


Article 189: Control of the Union over Provinces in certain cases.

  1. The executive power of every Province shall be so exercised as not to impede or prejudice the exercise of the executive power of the Union, and the executive power of the Union shall extend to the giving of such directions to a Province as may appear to the Government of the United Kingdom to be necessary for that purpose.
  2. The executive power of the Union shall also extend to the giving of directions to a Province as to the construction and maintenance of means of communication declared in the direction to be of national or military importance:
    1. Provided that nothing in this clause shall be taken as restricting the power of Parliament to declare highways or waterways to be national highways or national waterways or the power of the Union with respect to the highways or waterways so declared or the power of the Union to construct and maintain means of communication as part of its functions with respect to naval, military and air force works.
  3. The executive power of the Union shall also extend to the giving of directions to a Province as to the measures to be taken for the protection of the railways within the Province.
  4. Where in carrying out any direction given to a Province under clause (2) as to the construction or maintenance of any means of communication or under clause (3) as to the measures to be taken for the protection of any railway, costs have been incurred in excess of those which would have been incurred in the discharge of the normal duties of the Province if such direction had not been given, there shall be paid by the Government of the United Kingdom to the Province such sum as may be agreed, or, in default of agreement, as may be determined by an arbitrator appointed by the Chief Justice of the United Kingdom, in respect of the extra costs so incurred by the Province.


Article 190: Public acts, records and judicial proceedings.

  1. Full faith and credit shall be given throughout the territory of the United Kingdom to public acts, records and judicial proceedings of the Union and of every Province.
  2. The manner in which and the conditions under which the acts, records and proceedings referred to in clause (1) shall be proved and the effect thereof determined shall be as provided by law made by Parliament.
  3. Final judgments or orders delivered or passed by civil courts in any part of the territory of the United Kingdom shall be capable of execution anywhere within that territory according to law.


PART X: FINANCE, PROPERTY, CONTRACTS AND SUITS

CHAPTER I: - FINANCE

GENERAL

Article 191: Taxes not to be imposed save by the authority of the law.

  1. No tax may be levied or collected within the territory of the United Kingdom, save under the authority of the law.


Article 192: Consolidated funds and public accounts of the United Kingdom and the Provinces.

  1. Subject to the provisions of Article 195 and to the provisions of this Chapter with respect to the assignment of the whole or part of the net proceeds of certain taxes and duties to Provinces, all revenues received by the Government of the United Kingdom, all loans raised by that Government by the issue of treasury bills, loans or ways and means advances and all moneys received by that Government in repayment of loans shall form one consolidated fund to be entitled “the Consolidated Fund of the United Kingdom”, and all revenues received by the Government of a Province, all loans raised by that Government by the issue of treasury bills, loans or ways and means advances and all moneys received by that Government in repayment of loans shall form one consolidated fund to be entitled “the Consolidated Fund of the Province”
  2. All other public moneys received by or on behalf of the Government of the United Kingdom or the Government of a Province shall be credited to the public account of the United Kingdom or the public account of the Province, as the case may be.
  3. No moneys out of the Consolidated Fund of the United Kingdom or the Consolidated Fund of a Province shall be appropriated except in accordance with law and for the purposes and in the manner provided in this Constitution


Article 193: Contingency fund.

  1. Parliament may by law establish a Contingency Fund in the nature of an imprest to be entitled “the Contingency Fund of the United Kingdom” into which shall be paid from time to time such sums as may be determined by such law, and the said Fund shall be placed at the disposal of the Executive Council to enable advances to be made by them out of such Fund for the purposes of meeting unforeseen expenditure.
  2. The Legislature of a Province may by law establish a Contingency Fund in the nature of an imprest to be entitled “the Contingency Fund of the Province” into which shall be paid from time to time such sums as may be determined by such law, and the said Fund shall be placed at the disposal of the First Minister of the Province to enable advances to be made by them out of such Fund for the purposes of meeting unforeseen expenditure.


DISTRIBUTION OF REVENUES BETWEEN THE UNION AND THE PROVINCES

Article 194: Grants from the Union to certain Provinces.

  1. Such sums as Parliament may by law provide shall be charged on the Consolidated Fund of the United Kingdom in each year as grants-in-aid of the revenues of such Provinces as Parliament may determine to be in need of assistance, and different sums may be fixed for different Province.


MISCELLANEOUS FINANCIAL PROVISIONS

Article 195: Expenditure defrayable by the Union or a Province out of its revenues.

  1. The Union or a Province may make any grants for any public purpose, notwithstanding that the purpose is not one with respect to which Parliament or the Legislature of the Province, as the case may be, may make laws.


Article 196: Exemption of property of the Union from Provincial Taxation.

  1. Unless otherwise legislated for by Parliament, the property of the Union will be completely exempt from taxation by any Province.


CHAPTER II: - BORROWING

Article 197: Borrowing by the government of the United Kingdom.

  1. The executive power of the Union extends to borrowing upon the security of the Consolidated Fund of the United Kingdom within such limits, if any, as may from time to time be fixed by Parliament by law and to the giving of guarantees within such limits, if any, as may be so fixed.


Article 198: Borrowing by a Province.

  1. Subject to the provisions of this article, the executive power of a Province extends to borrowing within the territory of the United Kingdom upon the security of the Consolidated Fund of the Province within such limits, if any, as may from time to time be fixed by the Legislature of such Province by law and to the giving of guarantees within such limits, if any, as may be so fixed.
  2. The Government of the United Kingdom may, subject to such conditions as may be laid down by or under any law made by Parliament, make loans to any Province or, give guarantees in respect of loans raised by any Province, and any sums required for the purpose of making such loans shall be charged on the Consolidated Fund of the United Kingdom.
  3. A Province may not without the consent of the Government of the United Kingdom raise any loan if there is still outstanding any part of a loan which has been made to the Province by the Government of the United Kingdom or by its predecessor Government, or in respect of which a guarantee has been given by the Government of the United Kingdom or by its predecessor Government.
  4. A consent under clause (3) may be granted subject to such conditions, if any, as the Government of the United Kingdom may think fit to impose.


CHAPTER III.—RESOURCES OF THE UNION

Article 199: Things of value within territorial waters or continental shelf and resources of the exclusive economic zone to vest in the Union.

  1. All lands, minerals and other things of value underlying the ocean within the territorial waters, or the continental shelf, or the exclusive economic zone, of the United Kingdom shall vest in the Union and be held for the purposes of the Union.
  2. All other resources of the exclusive economic zone of the United Kingdom shall also vest in the Union and be held for the purposes of the Union.
  3. The limits of the territorial waters, the continental shelf, the exclusive economic zone, and other maritime zones, of the United Kingdom shall be such as may be specified, from time to time, by or under any law made by Parliament.


Article 200: Public Pay Commission.

  1. There shall be a public pay commission constituted of independent members whos appointment may be regulated by law.
  2. The Public Pay Commission shall determine the pay of any person who:
    1. is an elected Official mentioned in this constitution;
    2. is a member of the armed or intelligence forces;
    3. is a person employed by the Government of the United Kingdom; or
    4. is an employee of a public body.
  3. Any remuneration may be subject to maximum caps which Parliament may, by law, apply.




CHAPTER IV.—RIGHT TO PROPERTY

Article 201: Protection of Property Rights.

  1. No person, persons or entity within the territory shall be deprived of their property save where provisions of law permit.
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PART XI: TRADE, COMMERCE AND INTERCOURSE WITHIN THE TERRITORY OF THE UNITED KINGDOM

Article 202: Free trade.

  1. Save for other provisions made in this part trade in the United Kingdom shall be free.


Article 203: Power of Parliament to impose restrictions on trade, commerce and intercourse.

  1. Parliament may by law impose such restrictions on the freedom of trade, commerce or intercourse between one Province and another or within any part of the territory of the United Kingdom as may be required in the public interest.


Article 204: Restriction on preferential treatment by the State and Provinces.

  1. Notwithstanding anything in Article 203, neither Parliament nor the legislature of a Province may make laws giving preference to one Province over another or one company over another.
  2. Nothing in clause (1) shall prevent Parliament from making any law giving, or authorising the giving of, any preference or making, or authorising the making of, any discrimination if it is declared by such law that it is necessary to do so for the purpose of dealing with a situation arising from scarcity of goods in any part of the territory of the United Kingdom.


Article 205: Power of Provinces to impose restrictions on trade, commerce and intercourse.

  1. Provincial Legislatures may by law impose such restrictions on the freedom of trade, commerce or intercourse within any part of the territory of the Province as may be required in the public interest.
  2. Provincial legislatures may impose import duties on items brought into the province for the purpose of commerce.


PART XII: ELECTIONS

Article 206: Superintendence, direction and control of elections to be vested in an Election Commission.

  1. The superintendence, direction and control of the preparation of the electoral rolls for, and the conduct of, all elections to Parliament and to the Legislature of every Province and of elections to the Executive Council held under this Constitution shall be vested in a Commission (referred to in this Constitution as the Election Commission).
  2. The Election Commission shall consist of the Chief Election Commissioner and such number of other Election Commissioners, if any, as the Executive Council may from time to time fix and the appointment of the Chief Election Commissioner and other Election Commissioners shall, subject to the provisions of any law made in that behalf by Parliament, be made by the Monarch by writ, on the advice of the Chief Justice.
  3. When any other Election Commissioner is so appointed the Chief Election Commissioner shall act as the Chairman of the Election Commission.
  4. Before each general election to the House of Commons and to the Provincial Parliament of each Province the Queen, at the advice of the Executive Council, may also appoint after consultation with the Election Commission such Regional Commissioners as they may consider necessary to assist the Election Commission in the performance of the functions conferred on the Commission by clause (1).
  5. Subject to the provisions of any law made by Parliament, the conditions of service and tenure of office of the Election Commissioners and the Regional Commissioners shall be such as the Monarch may by rule determine:
    1. Provided that the Chief Election Commissioner shall not be removed from their office except in like manner and on the like grounds as a Judge of the Supreme Court and the conditions of service of the Chief Election Commissioner shall not be varied to their disadvantage after their appointment:
    2. Provided further that any other Election Commissioner or a Regional Commissioner shall not be removed from office except on the recommendation of the Chief Election Commissioner.
  6. The Prime Minister, or the First Minister of a Province, shall, when so requested by the Election Commission, make available to the Election Commission or to a Regional Commissioner such staff as may be necessary for the discharge of the functions


Article 207: Suffrage of elections.

  1. The elections to the House of Commons, the Executive Council and to the Provincial Legislature of every Province shall be on the basis of adult suffrage; that is to say, every person who is a citizen of the United Kingdom and who is not less than eighteen years of age on such date as may be fixed in that behalf by or under any law made by the appropriate Legislature and is not otherwise disqualified under this Constitution or any law made by the appropriate Legislature on the ground of non-residence, unsoundness of mind, crime or corrupt or illegal practice, shall be entitled to be registered as a voter at any such election.


Article 208: Political Parties

  1. Political parties and National Political Groups shall participate in the formation of the political will of the people. They may be freely established. Their internal organisation must conform to democratic principles. They must publicly account for their assets and for the sources and use of their funds.
  2. Parties that, by reason of their aims or the behaviour of their adherents, seek to undermine or abolish the free democratic basic order or to endanger the existence of the United Kingdom shall be unconstitutional. The Supreme Court shall rule on the question of unconstitutionality.
  3. Political Parties shall be registered on a Provincial level and may not extend their activities outside of the Province they are registered in.
  4. National Political Groups will be colectives of Political Parties and only they, alongside independent candidates shall be allowed to contest seats in the Executive Council.
  5. Details shall be regulated by federal laws.




PART XIII: OFFICIAL LANGUAGE, CAPITALS AND SYMBOLS

CHAPTER I: - LANGUAGE, CAPITAL AND SYMBOLS OF THE UNION

Article 209: The Official Language.

  1. The official languages of the Union shall be English and British Sign Language.


Article 210: The National Capital City.

  1. The City of Westminster shall be the Capital City of the United Kingdom


Article 211: Symbols of the Union.

  1. The Executive Council may, by order, designate official symbols of the Union.


CHAPTER II: - REGIONAL LANGUAGES, CAPITALS AND SYMBOLS.

Article 212: The Official Language of a Province.

  1. Each Province is free to set as many other official languages alongside English and British Sign Language within its borders.


Article 213: Provincial Capitals

  1. Each province is free to designate a Capital City from within its borders.
  2. Until otherwise provided for by law each province shall have its capital designated in Seventh Schedule.


Article 214: Provincial Symbols.

  1. Each Provincial Legislature may, by law, designate any symbol it so wishes to be a symbol of the province.


CHAPTER III: - LANGUAGE OF THE JUDICIARY

Article 215: Language for use in Courts and official documents.

  1. Until Parliament by law otherwise provides:
    1. all proceedings in the Supreme Court and in every High Court,
    2. the authoritative texts
      1. of all Bills to be introduced or amendments thereto to be moved in either House of Parliament or in the House or either House of the Legislature of a State,
      2. of all Acts passed by Parliament or the Legislature of a Province and of all Ordinances promulgated by the Prime Minister or the First Minister of a Province, and
      3. of all orders, rules, regulations and bye-laws issued under this Constitution or under any law made by Parliament or the Legislature of a Province,


shall be in the English language.

PART XIV: AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION

Article 216: Power of Parliament to amend this Constitution.

  1. Notwithstanding anything in this Constitution, Parliament may in exercise of its constituent power amend by way of addition, variation or repeal any provision of this Constitution in accordance with the procedure laid down in this article.
  2. An amendment of this Constitution may be initiated only by the introduction of a Bill for the purpose in any House of Parliament, and when the Bill is passed in all Houses by a majority of the total membership of that House and by a majority of not less than two-thirds of the members of that House present and voting, it shall be presented to the Monarch who shall give their assent to the Bill and thereupon the Constitution shall stand amended in accordance with the terms of the Bill:
    1. Provided that if such amendment seeks to make any change in:
      1. Article 126,or
      2. Chapter I of Part V, Chapter IV of Part V, Chapter III of Part VI, or Chapter I of Part XI, or
      3. any of the Lists in the Fifth Schedule, or
      4. the representation of Provinces in Parliament, or
      5. the provisions of this article,


the amendment shall also require to be ratified by the Legislatures of not less than one-half of the Provinces by resolutions to that effect passed by those Legislatures before the Bill making provision for such amendment is presented to the President for assent.

  1. Nothing in Article 11 shall apply to any amendment made under this article.
  2. No amendment of this Constitution including the provisions of Part III made or purporting to have been made under this article shall be called in question in any court on any ground.
  3. For the removal of doubts, it is hereby declared that there shall be no limitation whatever on the constituent power of Parliament to amend by way of addition, variation or repeal the provisions of this Constitution under this article.


PART XV: TEMPORARY AND TRANSITIONAL MEASURES

Article 217: Legislation existing before this constitution.

  1. Insofar as it is compatible with this constitution all laws passed previously to this constitution shall have effect in the areas they would have had effect if this constitution had not been implemented, except:
    1. all acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland passed in areas that the Parliament, under this constitution, has legislative authority for, are extended to the whole of the United Kingdom.


PART XVI: COMMENCEMENT, SHORT TITLE AND REPEALS

Article 218: Short title.

  1. This Constitution may be cited as the Constitution of the United Kingdom.


Article 219: Commencement.

  1. The following shall come into force immediately following royal assent:
    1. Part I;
    2. Part II;
    3. Part III;
    4. Part IV;
    5. Chapters IV and V of Part V;
    6. Chapter III and IV of Part VI;
    7. Part VII;
    8. Part VIII;
    9. Part X;
    10. Part XII;
    11. Chapters I and III of Part XIII;
    12. Part XIV;
    13. Part XVI;
  2. The following shall come into force on the first day of September, the year two thousand nineteen.
    1. Chapters I and II of Part VI;
    2. Part IX;
    3. Part XI;
    4. Chapter II of Part XIII;
    5. Part XV;
  3. The day of the first provincial elections shall be the the Twenty-ninth day of August, the year two thousand and nineteen
  4. The rest of the provisions of this constitution shall come into force on the seventh day of May, the year two thousand and twenty.


Article 220: Repeals.

  1. The following Acts are repealed:
    1. Clause thirteen of the Magna Carta
    2. Bill of Rights 1688;
    3. Parliament Act 1911;
    4. Parliament Act 1949;
    5. Life Peerages Act 1988;
    6. Ministerial and Other Salaries Act 1975;
    7. Scotland Act 1998;
    8. Government of Wales Act 1998;
    9. Northern Ireland Act 1998;
    10. House of Lords Act 1999; and
    11. Any other act, previously passed which the Supreme Court deems to be incompatible with this constitution.


SCHEDULES

FIRST SCHEDULE

The Provinces

The Counties listed shall be as per the Second Schedule

Province
Counties

1) The Unitary Province of Anguilla
Anguilla

2) The Unitary Province of Bermuda
Bermuda

3) Bernicia
Northumberland;
Tyne and Wear;
County Durham.

4) The Unitary Province of the British Virgin Islands
British Virgin Islands

5) The Unitary Province of the Cayman Islands
Cayman Islands

6) East Anglia
Bedfordshire;
Cambridgeshire;
Essex;
Hertfordshire;
Norfolk;
Suffolk

7) East Mercia
Derbyshire;
Leicestershire;
Lincolnshire;
Nottinghamshire;
Northamptonshire;
Rutland

8) The Unitary Province of the Falkland Islands
Falkland Islands

9) The Unitary Province of Gibraltar
Gibraltar

10) The Bailiwick of Guernsey
Guernsey;
Alderney;
Sark

11) The Unitary Province of the Isle of Man
Isle of Man

12) The Unitary Bailiwick of Jersey
Jersey

13) London
Barnet and Camden;
Bexley and Bromley;
Brent and Harrow;
City and East London;
Croydon and Sutton;
Ealing and Hillingdon;
Enfield and Haringey;
Greenwich and Lewisham;
Havering and Redbridge;
Lambeth and Southwark;
Merton and Wandsworth;
North East London;
South West London;
West Central London

14) The Unitary Province of Montserrat
Montserrat

15) Northern Ireland
Antrim;
Armagh;
Down;
Fermanagh;
Londonderry;
Tyrone

16) Rheged
Cheshire;
Cumbria;
Greater Manchester;
Lancashire;
Merseyside

17) Saint Helena, Ascension Island & Tristan da Cunha
Saint Helena;
Ascension Island;
Tristan da Cunha

18) Scotland
Dumfries and Galloway;
Fife;
Grampian;
Glasgow;
Highland;
Lothian;
Na h-Eileanan Siar;
Orkney Isles;
Roinn Meadhanach;
Shetland Isles;
Strathclyde;
Tayside;
The Mairches.

19) Sussex
Berkshire;
Buckinghamshire;
East Sussex;
Hampshire;
Isle of Wight;
Kent;
Oxfordshire;
Surrey;
West Sussex

20) The Unitary Province of the Turks and Caicos islands
Turks and Caicos Islands

21) Yorkshire
West Yorkshire;
East Riding of Yorkshire;
North Yorkshire;
South Yorkshire

22) Wales
(The Preserved Counties of)
Clwyd;
Dyfed;
Glamorgan;
Gwent;
Gwynedd;
Powys

22) Wessex
Bristol;
Cornwall;
Devon;
Dorset;
Gloucestershire;
Somerset;
Wiltshire

23) West Mercia
Herefordshire;
Shropshire;
Staffordshire;
Warwickshire;
West Midlands;
Worcestershire




The Crown Territories

  • ● The Pitcairn Islands
  • ● Akrotiri and Dhekelia
  • ● British Indian Ocean Territory
  • ● British Antarctic Territory
  • ● South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands
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SECOND SCHEDULE

Counties



Alderney

The area for which the House Assembly of Anguilla immediately before the passing of this constitution had legislative competence.
Anguilla

The area for which the States of Alderney immediately before the passing of this constitution had legislative competence.
Antrim

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenants of Antrim and Belfast had Lieutenancy over.
Armagh

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Armagh had Lieutenancy over.
Ascension Island

The area for which the Ascension Island Council immediately before the passing of this constitution had legislative competence
Barnet and Camden

The area contained in the London Assembly constituency of Barnet and Camden
Bedfordshire

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Bedfordshire had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Berkshire

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Berkshire had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Bermuda

The area for which the Parliament of Bermuda immediately before the passing of this constitution had legislative competence
Bexley and Bromley

The area contained in the London Assembly constituency of Bexley and Bromley
Brent and Harrow

The area contained in the London Assembly constituency of Brent and Harrow
Bristol

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Bristol had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
British Virgin Islands

The area for which the House of Assembly of the British Virgin Islands immediately before the passing of this constitution had legislative competence
Buckinghamshire

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Buckinghamshire had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Cambridgeshire

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Cambridgeshire had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Cayman Islands

The area for which the Legislative Assembly of the Cayman Islands immediately before the passing of this constitution had legislative competence
Cheshire

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Cheshire had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
City and East London

The area contained in the London Assembly constituency of City and East
Clwyd

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Clwyd had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Cornwall

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Cornwall had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
County Down

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Down had Lieutenancy over.
County Durham

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Durham had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Croydon and Sutton

The area contained in the London Assembly constituency of Croydon and Sutton
Cumbria

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Cumbria had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Derbyshire

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Derbyshire had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Devon

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Devon had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Dorset

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Dorset had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Dumfries and Galloway

The area contained in the council area of Dumfries and Galloway in accordance to the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994.
Dyfed

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Dyfed had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Ealing and Hillingdon

The area contained in the London Assembly constituency of Ealing and Hillingdon
East Riding of Yorkshire

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of the East Riding of Yorkshire had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
East Sussex

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of East Sussex had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Enfield and Haringey

The area contained in the London Assembly constituency of Enfield and Haringey
Essex

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Essex had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Falkland Islands

The area for which the Legislative Assembly of the Falkland Islands immediately before the passing of this constitution had legislative competence
Fermanagh

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Fermanagh had Lieutenancy over.
Fife

The area contained in the council area of fife in accordance to the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994.
Gibraltar

The area for which the Gibraltar Parliament immediately before the passing of this constitution had legislative competence
Glamorgan

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenants of West Glamorgan, South Glamorgan and Mid Glamorgan had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Glasgow

The area contained in the council areas of East Dunbartonshire, East Renfrewshire Glasgow City, North Lanarkshire, Renfrewshire and West Dunbartonshire in accordance to the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994.
Gloucestershire

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Gloucestershire had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Grampian

The area contained in the council areas of Aberdeenshire, City of Aberdeen, Moray in accordance to the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994.
Greater Manchester

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Greater Manchester had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Greenwich and Lewisham

The area contained in the London Assembly constituency of Greenwich and Lewisham
Guernsey

The area for which the States of Guernsey immediately before the passing of this constitution had legislative competence excluding the county of Alderney
Gwent

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Gwent had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Gwynedd

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Gwynedd had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Hampshire

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Hampshire had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Havering and Redbridge

The area contained in the London Assembly constituency of Havering and Redbridge
Herefordshire

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Herefordshire had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Hertfordshire

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Hertfordshire had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Highland

The area contained in the council area of Highland in accordance to the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994.
Isle of Man

The area for which the High Court of Tynwald immediately before the passing of this constitution had legislative competence
Isle of Wight

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of the Isle of Wight had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Jersey

The area for which the States of Jersey immediately before the passing of this constitution had legislative competence
Kent

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Kent had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Lambeth and Southwark

The area contained in the London Assembly constituency of Lambeth and Southwark
Lancashire

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Lancashire had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Leicestershire

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Leicestershire had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Lincolnshire

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Lincolnshire had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Londonderry

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenants of Derry and County Londonderry had Lieutenancy over.
Lothian

The area contained in the council areas of East Lothian, city of Edinburgh, Midlothian and West Lothian in accordance to the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994.
Merseyside

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Merseyside had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Merton and Wandsworth

The area contained in the London Assembly constituency of Merton and Wandsworth
Montserrat

The area for which the Legislative Assembly of Montserrat immediately before the passing of this constitution had legislative competence
Na h-Eileanan Siar

The area contained in the council area of Na h-Eileanan Siar in accordance to the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994.
Norfolk

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Norfolk had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
North East London

The area contained in the London Assembly constituency of North East
North Yorkshire

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of North Yorkshire had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Northamptonshire

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Northamptonshire had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Northumberland

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Northumberland had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Nottinghamshire

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Nottinghamshire had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Orkney Islands

The area contained in the council area of Orkney Islands in accordance to the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994.
Oxfordshire

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Oxfordshire had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Powys

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Powys had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Roinn Meadhanach

The area contained in the council areas of Clackmannanshire, Falkirk and Stirling in accordance to the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994.
Rutland

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Rutland had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Saint Helena

The area for which the Legislative Council of Saint Helena immediately before the passing of this constitution had legislative competence
Sark

The area for which the Chief Pleas of Sark immediately before the passing of this constitution had legislative competence
Shetland Islands

The area contained in the council area of Shetland Islands in accordance to the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994.
Shropshire

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Shropshire had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Somerset

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Somerset had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
South West London

The area contained in the London Assembly constituency of South East
South Yorkshire

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of South Yorkshire had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Staffordshire

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Staffordshire had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Strathclyde

The area contained in the council areas of Argyll and Bute, East Ayrshire, Inverclyde, North Ayrshire, South Ayrshire and South Lanarkshire in accordance to the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994.
Suffolk

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Suffolk had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Surrey

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Surrey had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Tayside

The area contained in the council areas of Dundee City Council, Perth & Kinross, Angus in accordance to the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994.
The Mairches

The area contained in the council area of Scottish Borders in accordance to the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994.
Tristan da Cunha

The area for which the Tristan da Cunha Island Council immediately before the passing of this constitution had legislative competence
Turks and Caicos Islands

The area for which the House of Assembly of the Turks and Caicos Islands immediately before the passing of this constitution had legislative competence
Tyne and Wear

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Tyne and Wear had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Tyrone

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Tyrone had Lieutenancy over.
Warwickshire

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Warwickshire had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
West Central London

The area contained in the London Assembly constituency of West Central
West Midlands

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of the West Midlands had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
West Sussex

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of West Sussex had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
West Yorkshire

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of West Yorkshire had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Wiltshire

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Wiltshire had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.
Worcestershire

The area for which, immediately prior to the adoption of this constitution the Lord Lieutenant of Worcestershire had Lieutenancy over in accordance with the Lieutenancies Act 1997.




THIRD SCHEDULE

Forms of Oaths or Affirmations

  1. The oath of an MP shall be:


“I, (Insert full name), do swear that I will well and truly serve Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth in the office of Member of Parliament for (insert constituency). So help me God.”

Or

“I, (Insert full name), do affirm that I will well and truly serve Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth in the office of Member of Parliament for (insert constituency). ”

FOURTH SCHEDULE

Secretaries of State

1) Chancellor of the Exchequer

  • a) Overall responsibility for all economic and financial matters



2) Secretary of State for the HomeDepartment

  • a) Drugs
  • b) Immigration
  • c) Law and Order
  • d) Running of elections



3) Secretary of State for Foreign andCommonwealth Affairs

  • a) Relations with nations external to the United Kingdom
  • b) Matters pertaining to the organization and running of NATO
  • c) Matters pertaining to the UN



4) Secretary of State for Defence

  • a) The Defence forces of the United Kingdom



5) Secretary of State for Justice

  • a) The good running of all Courts
  • b) The provision of legal aid and accessibility of the Courts
  • c) The upholding of the Constitution



6) Secretary of State for Health andSocial Care

  • a) The continues mental and physical wellbeing of all citizens of the United Kingdom



7) Secretary of State forInternational Trade

  • a) Negotiating international trade agreements for the United Kingdom.



8) Secretary of State for Education

  • a) Responsible for compulsory education, universities and lifelong learning



9) Secretary of State for Business

  • a) All trade and commerce within the UK



10) Secretary of State for Energy

  • a) The provision of energy within the UK and ensuring access to it.



11) Secretary of State forEnvironment, Food and Rural Affairs

  • a) The maintenance of all national parks
  • b) Public health related to food standards
  • c) Protection of the environment



12) Secretary of State for Transport

  • a) The provision of and access to public transport within the UK.
  • b) Upkeep of roads
  • c) Vehicle standards and safety
  • d) Upkeep of all internal waterways and water courses



13) Secretary of State forCommunities, Housing and Local Government

  • a) The provision of good quality housing
  • b) County elections
  • c) Ensuring that local self governance is effective



14) Secretary of State forInternational Development

  • a) Administering foreign aid



15) Secretary of State for Digital,Culture, Media and Sport

  • a) Cultural activities
  • b) Sporting events
  • c) Provision of the internet
  • d) Media
  • e) Tourism
  • f) Leisure



16) Secretary of State for Work andPensions

  • a) Employment rights
  • b) Social security



17) Secretary of State for Immigration

  • a) Administering immigration services
  • b) Setting tests and requirements for patriation

FIFTH SCHEDULE

Union List
  1. Defence of the United Kingdom and every part thereof including preparation for defence and all such acts as may be conducive in times of war to its prosecution and after its termination to effective demobilisation.
  2. Naval, military and air forces; any other armed forces of the Union.
    1. Deployment of any armed force of the Union or any other force subject to the control of the Union or any contingent or unit thereof in any State in aid of the civil power; powers, jurisdiction, privileges and liabilities of the members of such forces while on such deployment.
  3. Naval, military and air force works.
  4. Arms, firearms, ammunition and explosives.
  5. Atomic energy and mineral resources necessary for its production.
  6. Industries declared by Parliament by law to be necessary for the purpose of defence or for the prosecution of war.
  7. MI5, MI6 and GCHQ.
  8. Preventive detention for reasons connected with Defence, Foreign Affairs, or the security of the United Kingdom; persons subjected to such detention.
  9. Foreign affairs; all matters which bring the Union into relation with any foreign country.
  10. Diplomatic, consular and trade representation.
  11. United Nations Organisation.
  12. Participation in international conferences, associations and other bodies and implementing of decisions made thereat.
  13. Entering into treaties and agreements with foreign countries and implementing of treaties, agreements and conventions with foreign countries.
  14. War and peace.
  15. Foreign jurisdiction.
  16. Citizenship, naturalisation and aliens.
  17. Extradition.
  18. Admission into, and emigration and expulsion from, the United Kingdom; passports and visas.
  19. Pilgrimages to places outside India.
  20. Piracies and crimes committed on the high seas or in the air; offences against the law of nations committed on land or the high seas or in the air.
  21. Railways.
  22. Highways declared by or under law made by Parliament to be national highways.
  23. Shipping and navigation on inland waterways, declared by Parliament by law to be national waterways, as regards mechanically propelled vessels; the rule of the road on such waterways.
  24. Maritime shipping and navigation, including shipping and navigation on tidal waters; provision of education and training for the mercantile marine and regulation of such education and training provided by States and other agencies.
  25. Lighthouses, including lightships, beacons and other provision for the safety of shipping and aircraft.
  26. Ports declared by or under law made by Parliament or existing law to be major ports, including their delimitation, and the constitution and powers of port authorities therein.
  27. Port quarantine, including hospitals connected therewith; seamen’s and marine hospitals.
  28. Airways; aircraft and air navigation; provision of aerodromes; regulation and organisation of air traffic and of aerodromes; provision for aeronautical education and training and regulation of such education and training provided by States and other agencies.
  29. Carriage of passengers and goods by railway, sea or air, or by national waterways in mechanically propelled vessels.
  30. Posts and telegraphs; telephones, wireless, broadcasting and other like forms of communication.
  31. Property of the Union and the revenue therefrom, but as regards property situated in a State subject to legislation by the State, save in so far as Parliament by law otherwise provides.
  32. Public debt of the Union.
  33. Currency, coinage and legal tender; foreign exchange.
  34. Foreign loans.
  35. Reserve Bank of the United Kingdom.
  36. Trade and commerce with foreign countries; import and export across customs frontiers; definition of customs frontiers.
  37. Incorporation, regulation and winding up of trading corporations, including banking, insurance and financial corporations, but not including co-operative societies.
  38. Incorporation, regulation and winding up of corporations, whether trading or not, with objects not confined to one Province, but not including universities.
  39. Banking.
  40. Bills of exchange, cheques, promissory notes and other like instruments.
  41. Insurance.
  42. Stock exchanges and futures markets.
  43. Patents, inventions and designs; copyright; trade-marks and merchandise marks.
  44. Establishment of standards of weight and measure.
  45. Establishment of standards of quality for goods to be exported out of the United Kingdom or transported from one State to another.
  46. Industries, the control of which by the Union is declared by Parliament by law to be expedient in the public interest.
  47. Regulation and development of oil fields and mineral oil resources; petroleum and petroleum products; other liquids and substances declared by Parliament by law to be dangerously inflammable.
  48. Regulation of mines and mineral development to the extent to which such regulation and development under the control of the Union is declared by Parliament by law to be expedient in the public interest.
  49. Regulation of labour and safety in mines and oilfields.
  50. Regulation and development of inter-Province rivers and river valleys to the extent to which such regulation and development under the control of the Union is declared by Parliament by law to be expedient in the public interest.
  51. Fishing and fisheries beyond territorial waters.
  52. Sanctioning of cinematograph films for exhibition.
  53. Industrial disputes concerning Union employees.
  54. Coordination and determination of standards in institutions for higher education or research and scientific and technical institutions.
  55. Ancient and historical monuments and records, and archaeological sites and remains, 1 declared by or under law made by Parliament to be of national importance.
  56. Census
  57. Elections to Parliament, to the Legislatures of Provinces and to the Executive Council; the Election Commission.
  58. Powers, privileges and immunities of each House of Parliament and of the members and the Committees of each House; enforcement of attendance of persons for giving evidence or producing documents before committees of Parliament or commissions appointed by Parliament.
  59. Constitution, organisation, jurisdiction and powers of the Supreme Court (including contempt of such Court), and the fees taken therein; persons entitled to practise before the Supreme Court.
  60. Constitution and organisation 1 (including vacations) of the High Courts except provisions as to officers and servants of High Courts; persons entitled to practise before the High Courts.
  61. Extension of the jurisdiction of a High Court to, and exclusion of the jurisdiction of a High Court from, any Union territory.
  62. Extension of the powers and jurisdiction of members of a police force belonging to any Province to any area outside that Province, but not so as to enable the police of one Province to exercise powers and jurisdiction in any area outside that Province without the consent of the Government of the Province in which such area is situated; extension of the powers and jurisdiction of members of a police force belonging to any Province to railway areas outside that Province.
  63. Corporation tax.
  64. Duties of customs including export duties.
  65. Terminal taxes on goods or passengers, carried by railway, sea or air; taxes on railway fares and freights.
  66. Offences against laws with respect to any of the matters in this List.
  67. Inquiries, surveys and statistics for the purpose of any of the matters in this List.
  68. Jurisdiction and powers of all courts, except the Supreme Court, with respect to any of the matters in this List; admiralty jurisdiction.
  69. Fees in respect of any of the matters in this List, but not including fees taken in any court.
  70. Any other matter not enumerated in List II or List III including any tax not mentioned in either of those Lists.

Concurrent List
  1. Criminal law, including all matters included in the British Penal Code at the commencement of this Constitution but excluding offences against laws with respect to any of the matters specified in List I or List III and excluding the use of naval, military or air forces or any other armed forces of the Union in aid of the civil power.
  2. Criminal procedure, including all matters included in the Code of Criminal Procedure at the commencement of this Constitution.
  3. Preventive detention for reasons connected with the security of a Province, the maintenance of public order, or the maintenance of supplies and services essential to the community; persons subjected to such detention.
  4. Removal from one Province to another Province of prisoners, accused persons and persons subjected to preventive detention for reasons specified in entry 3 of this List.
  5. Marriage and divorce; infants and minors; adoption; wills, intestacy and succession; joint family and partition; all matters in respect of which parties in judicial proceedings were immediately before the commencement of this Constitution subject to their personal law.
  6. Transfer of property; registration of deeds and documents.
  7. Contracts, including partnership, agency, contracts of carriage, and other special forms of contracts.
  8. Actionable wrongs.
  9. Bankruptcy and insolvency.
  10. Trust and Trustees.
  11. Administrators-general and official trustees.
    1. Administration of Justice; constitution and organisation of all courts, except the Supreme Court and the High Courts.
  12. Evidence and oaths; recognition of laws, public acts and records, and judicial proceedings.
  13. Civil procedure, limitation and arbitration.
  14. Contempt of court, but not including contempt of the Supreme Court.
  15. Vagrancy.
  16. Lunacy and mental deficiency, including places for the reception or treatment of lunatics and mental deficients.
  17. Prevention of cruelty to animals.
    1. Forests.
    2. Protection of wild animals and birds.
  18. Adulteration of foodstuffs and other goods.
  19. Drugs and poisons.
  20. Economic and social planning.
    1. Population control and family planning.
  21. Commercial and industrial monopolies, combines and trusts.
  22. Trade unions; industrial and labour disputes.
  23. Social security and social insurance; employment and unemployment.
  24. Welfare of labour including conditions of work, provident funds, employers’ liability, workmen’s compensation, invalidity and old age pensions and maternity benefits.
  25. Education, including technical education, medical education and universities
  26. Legal, medical and other professions.
  27. Charities and charitable institutions, charitable and religious endowments and religious institutions.
  28. Prevention of the extension from one Province to another of infectious or contagious diseases or pests affecting men, animals or plants.
  29. Vital statistics including registration of births and deaths.
  30. Ports other than those declared by or under law made by Parliament or existing law to be major ports.
  31. Shipping and navigation on inland waterways as regards mechanically propelled vessels, and the rule of the road on such waterways, and the carriage of passengers and goods on inland waterways subject to the provisions of List I with respect to national waterways.
  32. Mechanically propelled vehicles including the principles on which taxes on such vehicles are to be levied.
  33. Factories.
  34. Boilers.
  35. Electricity.
  36. Archaeological sites and remains other than those declared by or under law made by Parliament to be of national importance.
  37. Taxes on income
  38. Duties of excise on tobacco and any other goods produced in the United Kingdom
  39. Taxes on the capital value of the assets of individuals and companies; taxes on the capital of companies
  40. Estate duty in respect of property
  41. Duties in respect of succession to property
  42. Jurisdiction and powers of all courts, except the Supreme Court, with respect to any of the matters in this List.
  43. Fees in respect of any of the matters in this List, but not including fees taken in any court.

Provinces List
  1. Public order but not including the use of any naval, military or air force or any other armed force of the Union or of any other force subject to the control of the Union or of any contingent or unit thereof in aid of the civil power.
  2. Officers and servants of the High Court; procedure in rent and revenue courts; fees taken in all courts except the Supreme Court.
  3. Prisons, reformatories, Borstal institutions and other institutions of a like nature, and persons detained therein; arrangements with other States for the use of prisons and other institutions.
  4. Local government, that is to say, the constitution and powers of municipal corporations, improvement trusts, districts boards, mining settlement authorities and other local authorities for the purpose of local self government or village administration.
  5. Public health and sanitation; hospitals and dispensaries.
  6. Pilgrimages, other than pilgrimages to places outside the United Kingdom.
  7. Intoxicating liquors, that is to say, the production, manufacture, possession, transport, purchase and sale of intoxicating liquors.
  8. Relief of the disabled and unemployable.
  9. Burials and burial grounds; cremations and cremation grounds.
  10. Libraries, museums and other similar institutions controlled or financed by the State; ancient and historical monuments and records other than those declared by or under law made by Parliament to be of national importance.
  11. Agriculture, including agricultural education and research, protection against pests and prevention of plant diseases.
  12. Preservation, protection and improvement of stock and prevention of animal diseases; veterinary training and practice.
  13. Water, that is to say, water supplies, irrigation and canals, drainage and embankments, water storage and water power subject to the provisions of entry 50 of List I.
  14. Land, that is to say, rights in or over land, land tenures including the relation of landlord and tenant, and the collection of rents; transfer and alienation of agricultural land; land improvement and agricultural loans; colonization.
  15. Fisheries
  16. Gas and gas-works.
  17. Trade and commerce within the State subject to the provisions of entry 33 of List III.
  18. Production, supply and distribution of goods subject to the provisions of entry 33 of List III.
  19. Markets and fairs
  20. Money-lending and money-lenders.
  21. Theatres and dramatic performances; cinemas, sports, entertainments and amusements.
  22. Betting and gambling.
  23. Works, lands and buildings vested in or in the possession of the State
  24. Inns and innkeepers
  25. Elections to the Legislature of the Province, subject to any laws made by Parliament.
  26. Public debt of the Province.
  27. Treasure trove.
  28. Tolls.
  29. Offences against laws with respect to any of the matters in this List.
  30. Jurisdiction and powers of all courts, except the Supreme Court, with respect to any of the matters in this List.
  31. Fees in respect of any of the matters in this List, but not including fees taken in any court.
  32. The creation of new Counties within the Province, subject to ratification of the Executive Council
    1. The use of this power shall amend the First and Second Schedules accordingly but shall not be treated as an amendment to the constitution.

SIXTH SCHEDULE

Responsibilities of County Councils
  1. Urban planning including town planning.
  2. Regulation of land-use and construction of buildings.
  3. Planning for economic and social development.
  4. Roads and bridges.
  5. Water supply for domestic, industrial and commercial purposes.
  6. Public health, sanitation conservancy and solid waste management.
  7. Fire services.
  8. Education, including primary and secondary schools.
  9. Libraries
  10. Urban forestry, protection of the environment and promotion of ecological aspects.
  11. Safeguarding the interests of weaker sections of society.
  12. Provision of urban amenities and facilities such as parks, gardens, playgrounds.
  13. Promotion of cultural, educational and aesthetic aspects.
  14. Burials and burial grounds; cremations, cremation grounds; and electric crematoriums.
  15. Prevention of cruelty to animals.
  16. Vital statistics including registration of births and deaths.
  17. Public amenities including street lighting, parking lots, bus stops and public conveniences.
  18. Maintenance of community assets
  19. Any other authority the State or Province imbues them with by law.
0
Saracen's Fez
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#8
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#8


SEVENTH SCHEDULE




Provincial Capitals


Province
Capital
1) The Unitary Province of Anguilla
The Valley
2) The Unitary Province of Bermuda
Hamilton
3) Bernicia
Durham
4) The Unitary Province of the British Virgin Islands
Road Town
5) The Unitary Province of the Cayman Islands
George Town
6) East Anglia
Cambridge
7) East Mercia
Leicester
8) The Unitary Province of the Falkland Islands
Stanley
9) The Unitary Province of Gibraltar
Gibraltar
10) The Bailiwick of Guernsey
Saint Peters Port
11) The Unitary Province of the Isle of Man
Douglas
12) The Unitary Bailiwick of Jersey
Saint Helier
13) London
City of London
14) The Unitary Province of Montserrat
Plymouth
15) Northern Ireland
Belfast
16) Rheged
Manchester
17) Saint Helena, Ascension Island & Tristan da Cunha
Jamestown
18) Scotland
Edinburgh
19) Sussex
Guildford
20) The Unitary Province of the Turks and Caicos islands
Cockburn Town
21) Yorkshire
York
22) Wales
Cardiff
22) Wessex
Bristol
23) West Mercia
Birmingham

0
Jammy Duel
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#9
Report 1 year ago
#9
How about no, what is the point?

It has also been brought to my attention that this is a simple copy and paste job with some words changed.
0
Aph
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#10
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#10
Thank you mr Speaker and thank you for the patience to post this!!!
0
username2718212
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#11
Report 1 year ago
#11
I am currently writing a reply to this... behemoth. Though I might add I am staunchly against adopting a codified constitution. Due to the sheer size of this, a response will take a few days.
0
DayneD89
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#12
Report 1 year ago
#12
You lost me at "The monarchy is kept", and doubly on them having ultimate executive power and immunity from legal prosecution.

Still, wow. I'll make comments later, but wow.
2
BR260799
Badges: 14
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#13
Report 1 year ago
#13
Why on earth would you want to give the monarchy back ultimate executive power and 'fairly broad' legislative power.

The moment we give the monarch back these discretionary powers is the moment Parliament is f*****, especially if there is no check on the royal prerogative or the law they make.

Not that Parliament would let this happen anyway.

There's so much more I want to say but it might take a while
1
CountBrandenburg
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#14
Report 1 year ago
#14
I wonder why you even bother at times... can I say no and be over and done with this bill?
Credit for you making Birmingham the capital of West Mercia though ( as much credit as you’re gonna hey Aph)
0
SoggyCabbages
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#15
Report 1 year ago
#15
Nah. When you said you were writing a "mega long" bill I was hoping for something we could debate, not a big slab of nonsense.
1
04MR17
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#16
Report 1 year ago
#16
Nay. Too short.
1
Thrillanthropist
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#17
Report 1 year ago
#17
Who can actually be bothered reading all that? Seriously?

Can someone create a tl;dr summary of this?
0
Joep95
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#18
Report 1 year ago
#18
(Original post by Thrillanthropist)
Who can actually be bothered reading all that? Seriously?

Can someone create a tl;dr summary of this?
The tldr version is:

‘’I once read the Indian constitution here is it copy and pasted thoughts?
0
Joel 96
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#19
Report 1 year ago
#19
This isn't going to get a lot of love from either the right or the left.
0
Life_peer
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#20
Report 1 year ago
#20
Why in the name of all that's reasonable would you do this?! Wait, it's Aph. Never mind…

Not just plagiarism but also utterly useless.
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