What is meant by the term "1 mole of ammonia molecules"?

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Kimistry
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I'm having a hard term understanding the mole concept. I have to answer this question for some homework. I've got down that 1 mole is a quantity of matter defined as avogadro's number; 6.022 x 1023. So essentially this term is referring to 6.022 x 1023 ammonia molecules. As i'm having a hard time understanding it, is there any further explanation that I can provide for the question and also my own understanding?

Thanks, any help is so appreciated

Also, the 23 is supposed to be in superscript
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username3089818
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(Original post by Kimistry)
I'm having a hard term understanding the mole concept. I have to answer this question for some homework. I've got down that 1 mole is a quantity of matter defined as avogadro's number; 6.022 x 1023. So essentially this term is referring to 6.022 x 1023 ammonia molecules. As i'm having a hard time understanding it, is there any further explanation that I can provide for the question and also my own understanding?

Thanks, any help is so appreciated

Also, the 23 is supposed to be in superscript
a mole refers to the number of particles in that substance and so one mol is the avogardo number.
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dinomite
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One mole of ammonia contains as many elementary entities (i.e. electrons, atoms, molecules etc.) as there are atoms in 12g of carbon-12 (which like you said, is Avogadro's constant: 6.02 x 10^23). Don't know if there's much else to it, but hopefully another comment can shed some light
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Kimistry
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Maybe i'm just overthinking it and thinking the answer needs more than what it is. Really appreciate the quick responses
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Bio 7
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(Original post by Kimistry)
I'm having a hard term understanding the mole concept. I have to answer this question for some homework. I've got down that 1 mole is a quantity of matter defined as avogadro's number; 6.022 x 1023. So essentially this term is referring to 6.022 x 1023 ammonia molecules. As i'm having a hard time understanding it, is there any further explanation that I can provide for the question and also my own understanding?

Thanks, any help is so appreciated

Also, the 23 is supposed to be in superscript

6.022 x 10^23


To show superscipt.
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Tootles
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(Original post by Kimistry)
I'm having a hard term understanding the mole concept. I have to answer this question for some homework. I've got down that 1 mole is a quantity of matter defined as avogadro's number; 6.022 x 1023. So essentially this term is referring to 6.022 x 1023 ammonia molecules. As i'm having a hard time understanding it, is there any further explanation that I can provide for the question and also my own understanding?

Thanks, any help is so appreciated

Also, the 23 is supposed to be in superscript
A mole is just a unit devised to express equal mounts of substances by particle, rather than by weight or volume. Basically a gram of hydrogen is not the same as a gram of ammonia. It's not important in daily life, but is important in reactions, because if you want a complete reaction you need amounts of chemicals that are equal by number of particles, not by weight or volume. This is my guess anyway, it's been a long time since I studied Chemistry.

Also if you can't write 1=6.022 x 10^23, write 6.022 E23. It means the same and you don't have to worry about ambiguity.
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jason0597
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One mole is defined as the amount of substance containing as many elementary entities as there are atoms in 12 grams of carbon-12. Since the number of atoms in 12 grams of carbon-12 is 6.023 x 10^23 (which is Avogadro's number), we can derive another definition.
The definition of 1 mole is that if you have 1 mole of a substance in the palm of your hand, then the number of molecules in your hand is equal to Avogadro's number.
1 mole of ammonia contains 6.023 x 10^23 number of ammonia (NH3) molecules.
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username2889812
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(Original post by Kimistry)
I'm having a hard term understanding the mole concept. I have to answer this question for some homework. I've got down that 1 mole is a quantity of matter defined as avogadro's number; 6.022 x 1023. So essentially this term is referring to 6.022 x 1023 ammonia molecules. As i'm having a hard time understanding it, is there any further explanation that I can provide for the question and also my own understanding?

Thanks, any help is so appreciated

Also, the 23 is supposed to be in superscript
https://www.thoughtco.com/definition...-number-604379
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morc13
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(Original post by Kimistry)
I'm having a hard term understanding the mole concept. I have to answer this question for some homework. I've got down that 1 mole is a quantity of matter defined as avogadro's number; 6.022 x 1023. So essentially this term is referring to 6.022 x 1023 ammonia molecules. As i'm having a hard time understanding it, is there any further explanation that I can provide for the question and also my own understanding?

Thanks, any help is so appreciated

Also, the 23 is supposed to be in superscript
You've got it. The number of moles of ammonia molecules is just the actual number of ammonia molecules divided by 6.022x10^23. So if you have the number of moles of a molecule you can multiply that by 6.022x10^23 to find the actual number of molecules you have. You should also learn where the number 6.022x10^23 comes about but I don't think it's important for this discussion. (The number of carbon-12 atoms in 12 grams of carbon-12, this number just makes calculations easier when dealing with ridiculously huge amounts of particles which is what chemistry generally deals with. It's sort of like a link between vastly different scales)
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Kimistry
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Wow this is such a great community! Thanks guys
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