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Is it worth subscribing to The Economist and The Financial Times, and noting down economics events happening daily? What books are useful for the A-level course?
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Dobby's Phoenix
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(Original post by boojai)
Is it worth subscribing to The Economist and The Financial Times, and noting down economics events happening daily? What books are useful for the A-level course?
If you're doing economics then yes! But don't just note down, that's next to useless. Analyse the articles and try to come at them with different theories and viewpoints. This will especially help if you ever have an interview. As for books, haven't got the foggiest.
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(Original post by Dobby's Phoenix)
If you're doing economics then yes! But don't just note down, that's next to useless. Analyse the articles and try to come at them with different theories and viewpoints. This will especially help if you ever have an interview. As for books, haven't got the foggiest.
For the A-level exam (and Cambridge economics admissions assessment) would it be helpful if I memorized some key statistics and facts, or should I invest my time practicing my evaluation skills instead?

Kind regards
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Samiik
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Economic and business review are both very useful and the ones i used. They link specifically to topics in the spec and also have questions that are answered by examiners. Its really important to practice evaluating as much as you can as thats what will get you the top marks. So do both, memorise key facts and stats and also perfect your exam technique.
If you have any specific questions, pm me and ill try my best to answer.
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(Original post by Samiik)
Economic and business review are both very useful and the ones i used. They link specifically to topics in the spec and also have questions that are answered by examiners. Its really important to practice evaluating as much as you can as thats what will get you the top marks. So do both, memorise key facts and stats and also perfect your exam technique.
If you have any specific questions, pm me and ill try my best to answer.
What websites/magazines specifically do you recommend for economic and business review? Also, is it worth reading economics books? I have found that economics books are harder to understand as they require understanding beyond the scope of A-level economics. As for Cambridge admissions assessment (especially the writing part), what is the best way to prepare? Are potential candidates expected to have read the books listed on the preliminary reading list before the assessment and interview?

Thank you for your kind answer
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The Financier
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(Original post by boojai)
Is it worth subscribing to The Economist and The Financial Times, and noting down economics events happening daily? What books are useful for the A-level course?
The FT is excellent and probably my favourite news source of the traditional newspapers. They have great deep-dives and if you're interested in Finance, Lex and DD are excellent perspectives and coverage to read.

That said, this is premised on whether you can afford it. If you don't have a lot of money, I wouldn't say it's worth a significant portion of your savings to get it. Ultimately, any significant news will be covered by the traditional free sources anyway.

In terms of books for A-Level, I don't there are any in particular that are necessary since A-Level teaching is very much self-contained. Instead, read books on aspects of Economics that you're interested in. Are there any issues in Economics that you care about in particular (inequality, automation and AI, finance etc.)? Read up on those so that as said above, you can show an obvious enthusiasm for parts of Econ at interviews, your personal statement etc.

Hope that helps!
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(Original post by TeeEff)
The FT is excellent and probably my favourite news source of the traditional newspapers. They have great deep-dives and if you're interested in Finance, Lex and DD are excellent perspectives and coverage to read.

That said, this is premised on whether you can afford it. If you don't have a lot of money, I wouldn't say it's worth a significant portion of your savings to get it. Ultimately, any significant news will be covered by the traditional free sources anyway.

In terms of books for A-Level, I don't there are any in particular that are necessary since A-Level teaching is very much self-contained. Instead, read books on aspects of Economics that you're interested in. Are there any issues in Economics that you care about in particular (inequality, automation and AI, finance etc.)? Read up on those so that as said above, you can show an obvious enthusiasm for parts of Econ at interviews, your personal statement etc.

Hope that helps!
I do not have a specific interest in an area of economics, but I'm definitely more inclined to macro than micro. Are EPQ and essay competition enough to show my interest in macro? My EPQ is about the Japanese asset price bubble and policies adopted (mainly monetary policy) to try to combat the effects of the bursting of the bubble, and my essay competition was about inflation and monetary policy. However, I doubt that I have the time to read any books as EPQ is taking up most of my time, so is it enough to just track important macro news on the FT, such as interest rate hikes and the reasons why they change? (my school is subscribed to it but I can't access it in summer) Also, is it important to have a specific interest or just in general is OK? Is it too late to start reading past articles now and how far back should I research? From 2008?

Thanks so much for your answer. Really appreciate it!
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The Financier
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(Original post by boojai)
I do not have a specific interest in an area of economics, but I'm definitely more inclined to macro than micro. Are EPQ and essay competition enough to show my interest in macro? My EPQ is about the Japanese asset price bubble and policies adopted (mainly monetary policy) to try to combat the effects of the bursting of the bubble, and my essay competition was about inflation and monetary policy. However, I doubt that I have the time to read any books as EPQ is taking up most of my time, so is it enough to just track important macro news on the FT, such as interest rate hikes and the reasons why they change? (my school is subscribed to it but I can't access it in summer) Also, is it important to have a specific interest or just in general is OK?

Thanks so much for your answer. Really appreciate it!
A general interest is fine but it's quite rare for someone not to have a particular interest in a certain field (e.g. you've already said you prefer macro econ to micro). Do you not need to research the lost decade for your EPQ then? Seems to me like you've already identified a topic of interest to read up on.
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