Lydia.Mx
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I'm trying to do work in the A-level head start chemistry books for summer work between year 11 and year 12 but I don't understand polarity. I understand electronegativity and how a bond becomes polar but not how an atom polarises a molecule. I'm sorry if I haven't explained this very well but if anyone could give me any help that would be much appreciated as everything I have read online is extremely complex! Thanks
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username4197586
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Try watching some YouTube videos. I think it’s easier than reading. I’m not qualified to give you A Level Chemistry advice so good luck!
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Lydia.Mx
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(Original post by Unscrewed_Up)
Try watching some YouTube videos. I think it’s easier than reading. I’m not qualified to give you A Level Chemistry advice so good luck!
Thanks for the idea - I have watched some videos but again they are quite complex as we never covered polarity in GCSE so just trying to find something that doesn't go really in depth straight away is hard but I'll keep looking - thanks for your help!
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Doctor2024
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(Original post by Lydia.Mx)
I'm trying to do work in the A-level head start chemistry books for summer work between year 11 and year 12 but I don't understand polarity. I understand electronegativity and how a bond becomes polar but not how an atom polarises a molecule. I'm sorry if I haven't explained this very well but if anyone could give me any help that would be much appreciated as everything I have read online is extremely complex! Thanks
I’m confused about what you’re asking. Molecules become polar due to differences in electronegativity between the atoms in that molecule (you seem to understand this), for example, in a H2O molecule, the oxygen is VERY electronegative, so pulls electrons from its covalent bond with Hydrogen, making Oxygen delta- and Hydrogen delta+. As a result, the whole molecule becomes polar due to this difference in electronegativity.

If you’re talking about polarity between molecules, and the attraction that follows, this is called VDW forces, and is caused by the random movement of electrons throughout the molecule, meaning at any one time, parts of the molecule become more - than other, temporarily causes a dipole.

(My chemistry is a little rusty forgive me for any mistakes 😂)
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Lydia.Mx
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(Original post by Doctor2024)
I’m confused about what you’re asking. Molecules become polar due to differences in electronegativity between the atoms in that molecule (you seem to understand this), for example, in a H2O molecule, the oxygen is VERY electronegative, so pulls electrons from its covalent bond with Hydrogen, making Oxygen delta- and Hydrogen delta+. As a result, the whole molecule becomes polar due to this difference in electronegativity.

If you’re talking about polarity between molecules, and the attraction that follows, this is called VDW forces, and is caused by the random movement of electrons throughout the molecule, meaning at any one time, parts of the molecule become more - than other, temporarily causes a dipole.

(My chemistry is a little rusty forgive me for any mistakes 😂)
Hi, thank you so much for the help.

I think what I was getting confused on was the fact that different molecules become charged at either end so to become charged like you said the electrons would be pulled from its covalent bond - in the textbook it wasn't very clear as it literally just said the 'chlorine atom polarises the molecule' so I wasn't entirely sure how it does but after reading what you've said makes a lot more sense!

I have no idea if I am being completely honest about the second part of what you said 😂 - I think thats a bit beyond me at the moment! I think you've answered what I wanted to know (I mean I wasn't really sure myself what I was confused on so I'm sorry that it was a bit unclear!) but what you've said has cleared it up so thanks very much, I really appreciate it
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Doctor2024
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(Original post by Lydia.Mx)
Hi, thank you so much for the help.

I think what I was getting confused on was the fact that different molecules become charged at either end so to become charged like you said the electrons would be pulled from its covalent bond - in the textbook it wasn't very clear as it literally just said the 'chlorine atom polarises the molecule' so I wasn't entirely sure how it does but after reading what you've said makes a lot more sense!

I have no idea if I am being completely honest about the second part of what you said 😂 - I think thats a bit beyond me at the moment! I think you've answered what I wanted to know (I mean I wasn't really sure myself what I was confused on so I'm sorry that it was a bit unclear!) but what you've said has cleared it up so thanks very much, I really appreciate it
No problem!

VDW forces are intermolecular forces of attraction that all molecules experience. I wouldn’t worry about it too much at the moment, but you’ll definitely learn about it during the 1st year of A level.
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Lydia.Mx
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(Original post by Doctor2024)
No problem!

VDW forces are intermolecular forces of attraction that all molecules experience. I wouldn’t worry about it too much at the moment, but you’ll definitely learn about it during the 1st year of A level.
Oh great thank you, I'll make sure that I write that down - thank you, thats very helpful and I really appreciate your help!
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