Saudi Arabia Execute Man Via CRUCIFIXION (and beheading) Watch

zebraguy 20
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#21
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#21
(Original post by morc13)
A long prison sentence to deter others from committing the same crimes and to protect the rest of society. Restorative justice to provide some form of repair to the people he may have harmed, through voluntary services.
How long would someone like that get in the jail in UK?
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Stalin
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#22
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#22
(Original post by zebraguy 20)
According to article they killed him before hanging him up, so method of death was not crucifixion.
I suppose that's progress.
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Napp
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#23
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(Original post by random_matt)
Who cares, death is death.
There is rather a large difference between executing someone with phenobarbital [or what not] or nailing them to a cross.
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joey11223
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#24
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#24
(Original post by Stalin)
I suppose that's progress.
In fairness done right beheading is just as instantaneous as say firing squad and arguably more instantaneous and less prone to error than lethal injection in the United States.

I think the issue is the more macabre nature of posing the headless body on a crucifix than the actual method of death. Though of course general anti-death penalty debate applies.

The biggest issue with the death penalty is obviously false convictions, if somehow the evidence was absolutely irrefutable that the man had say raped and killed someone, I wouldn't be against the death penalty.
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QE2
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The reason why Saudi Arabia uses crucifixion is because it is prescribed as a punishment in the Quran, and the constitution and legal system of Saudi Arabia is the Quran and sunnah. No other reason.
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QE2
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#26
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#26
(Original post by joey11223)
The biggest issue with the death penalty is obviously false convictions, if somehow the evidence was absolutely irrefutable that the man had say raped and killed someone, I wouldn't be against the death penalty.
Using violence to punish violence reminds me of a woman I saw in the supermarket a while ago smacking her child while shouting "don't hit your brother".
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Medrat
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#27
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#27
On what basis should citizens other than those that reside in that nation state be involved in the outrage? Surely a nation state can do what it likes, as long as the practice does not affect any other nation state, and vice versa...unless you want to enforce your own world-view onto someone else (this works vice versa, of course, too). If the citizens of that nation state don't like a practice, they, not anyone else, should do something about it, no matter how hard it is for them. By extension, another country's practices are their own, and should not be meddled with by anyone else...unless politicians, led by big business, have somehow decided otherwise. Oh.
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QE2
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(Original post by Medrat)
On what basis should citizens other than those that reside in that nation state be involved in the outrage? Surely a nation state can do what it likes, as long as the practice does not affect any other nation state, and vice versa...unless you want to enforce your own world-view onto someone else (this works vice versa, of course, too). If the citizens of that nation state don't like a practice, they, not anyone else, should do something about it, no matter how hard it is for them. By extension, another country's practices are their own, and should not be meddled with by anyone else...unless politicians, led by big business, have somehow decided otherwise. Oh.
On what basis are you claiming that people cannot be outrage about whatever the **** they want to be outraged about?

And I'm not even going to point out the irony in you expressing an opinion about something that doesn't concern you.
Oh, *******s!
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username3089818
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#29
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#29
(Original post by QE2)
The reason why Saudi Arabia uses crucifixion is because it is prescribed as a punishment in the Quran, and the constitution and legal system of Saudi Arabia is the Quran and sunnah. No other reason.
Before u make statements like this u should research regarding tazir and hudud (capital punishment),this case uses tazir (punishment decided by judge ) which is the ruling of a judge not the quran and sunnah
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Good bloke
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#30
(Original post by RJomana)
Before u make statements like this u should research regarding tazir and hudud (capital punishment),this case uses tazir (punishment decided by judge ) which is the ruling of a judge not the quran and sunnah
When was the last time you heard a book announce a judgement based on the facts of a case (or in any other circumstances for that matter)? There is no doubt that Saudi Arabia's law is based on the Koran.
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Good bloke
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#31
(Original post by zebraguy 20)
The man was convicted of theft, attempted rape and murder, what do you guys think is a just punishment for those crimes?
A long time in gaol. The world has moved on from the seventh century, leaving only Islam to try and drag everyone back in time.
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username3089818
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#32
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#32
(Original post by Good bloke)
When was the last time you heard a book announce a judgement based on the facts of a case (or in any other circumstances for that matter)? There is no doubt that Saudi Arabia's law is based on the Koran.
Can u explain what u r saying ?
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username3089818
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#33
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#33
(Original post by Good bloke)
When was the last time you heard a book announce a judgement based on the facts of a case (or in any other circumstances for that matter)? There is no doubt that Saudi Arabia's law is based on the Koran.
No, Saudi Arabia does not follow Quranic law. The House of Saud is one of the most dangerous institutions presently at war against Islam. The Saudi Arabian monarchy is a primary cause of nearly every single problem in the Muslim world today. It is their commanding the pledge of allegiance from the Muslims whilst taking for intimate companions the neocolonialist West that has led to the divisions, autocracy, war and oppression against the Muslim Ummah.

Article 5 of the Saudi Constitution clearly states that "The system of government in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is that of a monarchy." Yet the Quran tells us very clearly about what kings do where it says that "Surely the kings, when they enter a town, ruin it and make the noblest of its people to be low, and thus they always do" [27:34].

The Saudi banking system operates under interest (riba) which Sharia law strictly forbids. Saudi greed has totally replaced Islamic banking with the interest capitalist method.

These are just 2 examples of Saudi not following the Quranic laws rather following what they impose on others to be Islamic
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Ninja Squirrel
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When a country has as much oil as Saudi Arabia and are also allies with the west, they can get away with just about anything.
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username3089818
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(Original post by Good bloke)
When was the last time you heard a book announce a judgement based on the facts of a case (or in any other circumstances for that matter)? There is no doubt that Saudi Arabia's law is based on the Koran.
Furthermore Saudi follows the more extreme Wahabbi interpretation of the Quran which is disregarded by many Islamic scholars.

Wahhabism began as a social and religious reform movement in the 18th century and is closely associated with the founding and consolidation of the Saudi kingdom. Wahhabism calls for the literal interpretation of the Quran and includes strict enforcement of religious codes and practices. For decades, the Wahhabi doctrine has been upheld by clerics who run the judiciary and by religious police,so once again the interpretation is the kingdoms own not that which has been narated by the Prophet or his companions whom understood the context of the verses.
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Good bloke
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(Original post by RJomana)
Article 5 of the Saudi Constitution clearly states that "The system of government in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is that of a monarchy."
Oh dear!

Article 1 of the basic law states "God's book and the Sunna of His Prophet" are the country's constitution.

Article 8 states that justice, consultation, and equality shall be in accordance with Sharia.

Article 45 states that the king must rule according to the rulings of Islam and shall supervise the application of Sharia.

it doesn't get much clearer than that, does it?
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Good bloke
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(Original post by RJomana)
Furthermore Saudi follows the more extreme Wahabbi interpretation of the Quran which is disregarded by many Islamic scholars.
I'm full aware of the sect and its views. It follows a book (the Koran) that tells its followers to adhere to it literally. They do so literally. They would argue that they are the true Moslems and that the rest of you are nor truly Islamic, and they have a point.

It serves to highlight how dangerous Islam is to peace in the world.
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Medrat
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(Original post by QE2)
On what basis are you claiming that people cannot be outrage about whatever the **** they want to be outraged about?

And I'm not even going to point out the irony in you expressing an opinion about something that doesn't concern you.
Oh, *******s!
QE2 - I was using 'you' in the generic sense. Not aiming at 'you' personally. To parahprase what I want to say, people should be left alone to live how they want to live, because, er, they have to live there, but meddling politicians, bought by big business, have other ideas. I am of the 'let others live how they want. Let me (generic) live how I want' school of thought.
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TheYearNiner
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#39
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It's wrong but at the end of ye day he chose to break the law. He had his own free will so stop crying. Just obey the laws of that country, if it's extreme then move elsewhere.
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username2763536
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#40
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#40
(Original post by zebraguy 20)
The man was convicted of theft, attempted rape and murder, what do you guys think is a just punishment for those crimes?
This is the same country that executes people for apostasy or protesting.Do you really think their legal system is that good? At the most it's alleged theft, alleged murder and alleged rape.In such a backwards culture I doubt their standards of proof are as high as ours are.In which case they might well have beheaded an entirely innocent man.But yeah who cares right?
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