Saudi Arabia Execute Man Via CRUCIFIXION (and beheading) Watch

y.u.mad.bro?
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#61
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#61
No one's going to do anything since they have oil and therefore power for the time being. Let's move on with our lives.
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Rainfall
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#62
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Terrorists deserve to die.
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zebraguy 20
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#63
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(Original post by Robby2312)
Their law system is based upon sharia law which I don't particularly like no.If we are going to have a death penalty it should only be for particularly henious crimes like murder or child abuse.The problem is that it shouldn't really be about revenge.Otherwise we'd let the victims families decide a sentence which would just result in mob mentality.The sentence should fit the crime but neither should it amount to torture.Thats what's separates good people from bad people.We don't kill for fun.In my view the law should be as dispassionate as possible without letting emotions cloud the facts.But you have to have a high standard of proof.Even in the USA many innocent people have been convicted.


.And I agree with the corpses thing.Personally I do think it's pretty disrespectful to put somebody's body on display.It doesn't really make it better when we do it either.But it's not really like we're displaying it to scare people or to terrify them into submission.Those bodies are usually displayed for educational purposes in museums.Not saying it's right but they are different reasons.The way the Saudis do it is clearly meant to be a demonstration of power and a lesson to the populace.
But if you say execution should only happen for crimes like murder and child abuse then you are basically agreeing with the Saudi people to a certain level. According to news report, this man killed a woman, tried to kill a man, attempted to rape another woman and did theft. One of these crimes even matches your requirement for the death penalty. The article does not mention torture because he was dead from execution before they displayed his body.

From the Saudi Arabian POV it is there act as a deterrent to other would be criminals who commit such horrible crimes and also people can see justice has been done as that wrongdoing man has been punished severely. I can understand medical students gaining knowledge from cadavers or preserved body parts in jars or other containers but parts of einstein's brain which was taken without permission being on display just seems it is there to entertain people who visit.
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zebraguy 20
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#64
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Interestingly I saw two news article from the same news paper which had very similar stories. One news article was about this Saudi story and other was about Yemen story where some men had raped a 10 year old and murdered him and then the men were executed by gun shot as punishment and then their bodies hung in public.

In the Saudi article, I think the top three rated comments were attacking Saudi arabia. On the Yemen article, the top three rated comments were fully supportive of Yemen. It was strange to see this on the same website as the punishment dished out were very similar in nature.
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Medrat
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(Original post by zebraguy 20)
Interestingly I saw two news article from the same news paper which had very similar stories. One news article was about this Saudi story and other was about Yemen story where some men had raped a 10 year old and murdered him and then the men were executed by gun shot as punishment and then their bodies hung in public.

In the Saudi article, I think the top three rated comments were attacking Saudi arabia. On the Yemen article, the top three rated comments were fully supportive of Yemen. It was strange to see this on the same website as the punishment dished out were very similar in nature.
This is one of today's news stories (in the Daily Mail online):
"I'm really sorry': Rapist and murderer apologizes moments before 'coughing, turning purple and dying' from lethal dose of poison in Tennessee's first execution in a decade"
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Good bloke
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(Original post by johnny.snow)
dunno if you do
Surely that was clear from the words that you quoted. The clue is in 'the barbarity of executions'. The absence of a second definite article indicates I was talking of executions in general and not just about the ones under discussion in this thread, and the subsequent phrase, 'especially those carried out in a cruel way', emphasises that those under specific discussion are even worse than a run of the mill execution undertaken in a modern, more humane, manner
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Medrat
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#67
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(Original post by Good bloke)
Surely that was clear from the words that you quoted. The clue is in 'the barbarity of executions'. The absence of a second definite article indicates I was talking of executions in general and not just about the ones under discussion in this thread, and the subsequent phrase, 'especially those carried out in a cruel way', emphasises that those under specific discussion are even worse than a run of the mill execution undertaken in a modern, more humane, manner
Are some people arguing for a hierachy of executions, then? Can an execution ever be humane? I prefer the lateral approach - they do what they want, we do what we want, and never the twain shall meet.
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Underscore__
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#68
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(Original post by zebraguy 20)
The man was convicted of theft, attempted rape and murder, what do you guys think is a just punishment for those crimes?
A prison sentence long enough to rehabilitate the offender.
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Good bloke
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(Original post by Medrat)
I prefer the lateral approach - they do what they want, we do what we want, and never the twain shall meet.
Well, I don't disagree with that. Attempts to impose our standards on them, and vice versa, are both wrong and doomed to failure. In fact, having different countries with different ideas of morality is a good idea as people who agree with the Saudis who live in Britain can go there to live. The modern breed of regressive puritanical liberals should take note as this applies to people within Britain as well as countries abroad.
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Haviland-Tuf
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#70
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This thread is full of the same hypocrites that were rooting for the Beatles Jihadi pair to face capital punishment in the US.

Make your minds up already. Do you only support capital punishment when the victim is someone you don't like?
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#71
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(Original post by Haviland-Tuf)
Make your minds up already. Do you only support capital punishment when the victim is someone you don't like?
I don't support capital punishment. However, I do support each state's right to use it if it wishes (and for us not to interfere in that decision. If Saudi Arabia wishes to inflict cruel and barbaric punishments then that is a matter for Saudi Arabia.

I do not support the idea that Britain should try to interfere in what happens to the captured jihadis as they are (a) accused of crimes abroad, (b) are abroad, and (c) are not UK citizens. They chose to commit crimes and wage war and they must take the consequences of that choice from whatever country's hands they end up in.

I don't have to sympathise with criminals because I don't like capital punishment, of course.
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Fullofsurprises
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#72
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(Original post by RJomana)
No, Saudi Arabia does not follow Quranic law. The House of Saud is one of the most dangerous institutions presently at war against Islam. The Saudi Arabian monarchy is a primary cause of nearly every single problem in the Muslim world today. It is their commanding the pledge of allegiance from the Muslims whilst taking for intimate companions the neocolonialist West that has led to the divisions, autocracy, war and oppression against the Muslim Ummah.

Article 5 of the Saudi Constitution clearly states that "The system of government in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is that of a monarchy." Yet the Quran tells us very clearly about what kings do where it says that "Surely the kings, when they enter a town, ruin it and make the noblest of its people to be low, and thus they always do" [27:34].

The Saudi banking system operates under interest (riba) which Sharia law strictly forbids. Saudi greed has totally replaced Islamic banking with the interest capitalist method.

These are just 2 examples of Saudi not following the Quranic laws rather following what they impose on others to be Islamic
I'm sure there's merit in all of your quoted comparisons, but perhaps it's worth noting that for centuries, Islamic states were ruled by Caliphs who were monarchs in all but name, with the same arbitrary and unfettered powers as many European monarchs exercised in medieval times. So the argument against monarchy, whilst no doubt superficially valid from an Islamic point of view, did not stop dozens of other Islamic states in the past from similar abuses of government.
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Fullofsurprises
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#73
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(Original post by Good bloke)
I don't support capital punishment. However, I do support each state's right to use it if it wishes (and for us not to interfere in that decision. If Saudi Arabia wishes to inflict cruel and barbaric punishments then that is a matter for Saudi Arabia.

I do not support the idea that Britain should try to interfere in what happens to the captured jihadis as they are (a) accused of crimes abroad, (b) are abroad, and (c) are not UK citizens. They chose to commit crimes and wage war and they must take the consequences of that choice from whatever country's hands they end up in.

I don't have to sympathise with criminals because I don't like capital punishment, of course.
Saudi Arabia is a member of (and has even chaired) the UN Human Rights Council, which amongst other things, is committed to the global abolition of capital punishment. So it would appear that even the Saudis do not subscribe to the 'totally alone' principle of sovereign government, even if it is only a matter of paying lip service to wider ethical systems.

Still, the Saudis are in good company, like the US, North Korea and China, they just love a good execution.
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Good bloke
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
Saudi Arabia is a member of (and has even chaired) the UN Human Rights Council, which amongst other things, is committed to the global abolition of capital punishment.
I know, and this gives the lie to any who say that Moslems are incapable of gross hypocrisy. I suspect they wish to be inside the tent micturating out of the vent, while blocking others inside from rushing out and trying to get at them, rather than being outside powerless to stop the onslaught.
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Haviland-Tuf
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
Saudi Arabia is a member of (and has even chaired) the UN Human Rights Council, which amongst other things, is committed to the global abolition of capital punishment. So it would appear that even the Saudis do not subscribe to the 'totally alone' principle of sovereign government, even if it is only a matter of paying lip service to wider ethical systems.

Still, the Saudis are in good company, like the US, North Korea and China, they just love a good execution.
Add the UK to your list. We are complicit in the capital punishment if the Jihadi pair get trialed in the US.

In fact, waking up to news yesterday of a pregnant woman and her daughter being killed by Israeli air strikes and Saudi bombing a school bus full of Yemeni kids makes us complicit in cold-blooded murder of civilians abroad as well.
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ChaoticButterfly
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#76
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#76
We should join Canada in the boycott thing.
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Fullofsurprises
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(Original post by Haviland-Tuf)
Add the UK to your list. We are complicit in the capital punishment if the Jihadi pair get trialed in the US.

In fact, waking up to news yesterday of a pregnant woman and her daughter being killed by Israeli air strikes and Saudi bombing a school bus full of Yemeni kids makes us complicit in cold-blooded murder of civilians abroad as well.
Yes, it's an absolute disgrace that British warplanes and British military personnel are involved in these mass civilian killings in the Yemen, which appear to be serving little purpose other than further deepening the internal civil war within Islam between Sunni and Shia states, which the UK and the West should not be picking sides with - but are, due to oil and weapons sales interests.

Yesterday, British planes in Saudi hands killed 29 children and injured scores more.
https://twitter.com/ICRC_ye/status/1...-east-45128367

The people making these weapons systems and selling them to the Saudis should be ashamed of themselves, thinking only of their money and nothing of the innocents being slaughtered and our complicity with one of the worst regimes in the world.
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Fullofsurprises
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(Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
We should join Canada in the boycott thing.
I read that the Saudis are pulling their people out of Canada and cancelling flights to the country. I just couldn't help thinking how good that sounds and wondering why on earth we aren't joining with Canada.
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ChaoticButterfly
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
I read that the Saudis are pulling their people out of Canada and cancelling flights to the country. I just couldn't help thinking how good that sounds and wondering why on earth we aren't joining with Canada.
If only the opposition was lead by someone criticle of mainstream UK foreign policy for a change :beard:
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Good bloke
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(Original post by Haviland-Tuf)
Add the UK to your list. We are complicit in the capital punishment if the Jihadi pair get trialed in the US.
So you are in favour of British interference in foreign affairs generally, and in matters of justice specifically?
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