How to revise and deal with stress?

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livgenet
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Report Thread starter 1 year ago
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Hi, I'm new to TSR!

I would really appreciate any tips on revision. I'm entering Y11 after this summer and obviously, revision is essential since GCSEs are pretty imminent. I don't drastically struggle with revision (my grades do not suffer - grade 8 is my average), as I would say I'm a hardworking student, but I do put myself under a lot of pressure as a result.

Needless to say I think this stress would lessen if I had any tips on revising efficiently and combating my worries. Unfortunately I don't believe it will ever cease as I'm a natural worrier and I overthink everything.
My worst tendencies include that I procrastinate to avoid revision, and when I do start revising, I don't have a place within my house where I am completely comfortable and left to work in peace. Stressing out has caused me to become detached socially and harm friendships as a result, steer towards even more procrastination, feel worthless and like all efforts are futile, have no appetite, lose interest in other activities or lessons, etc, etc. However, I don't know if this is normal and a sacrifice I have to make to keep getting my grades.

Also, I am frequently unsure of my revision technique. Mostly, I:
- Make notes and diagrams including mind-maps
- Use colourful highlighters to outline what is key within my topics
- Make revision flashcards (but this is a lot of effort and usually I can't be bothered!)

But often it feels as if I am just copying and regurgitating things from a textbook or my exercise books, with the information not actually infiltrating my brain. I'd love some advice on new, fresher ways to revise. I don't know if I'm asking for the impossible and I will just have to face the fact that all revision tends to be this way and it generally sucks...but it was worth a shot!

Anything to try and make the coming year more enjoyable and less exam-orientated

Thank you for any input!
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lilyevans847
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In regards to not having a comfortable place to study. Is there a library near you that you could go to? The separation from being at home could also help with the procrastination. Or you could always set up a desk area which looks super nice (this helped me as it made me feel comfortable and wanting to sit down at it).
Your revision techniques do look good, the main thing I would recommend is past paper questions which you can use to make sure the knowledge is sinking in/ areas you need to work on. Something I did that was helpful would be to make flash cards from a revision guide, then Iater on I would do past paper questions, the act of writing out flash cards in itself is learning content and then you can just test yourself on the content from then on. Another useful technique is blurting (credit to YouTuber Jade Bowler) where you essentially get a fresh piece of paper and write out everything you you know about a topic (useful to do after you’ve learnt the flash cards). Then you can check for any gaps in your knowledge. I would also highly recommend a revision timetable, this makes sure you cover all the possible content and also helps to reduce procrastination because you aren’t wasting time thinking of what to do. I hope this helps : )
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livgenet
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(Original post by lilyevans847)
In regards to not having a comfortable place to study. Is there a library near you that you could go to? The separation from being at home could also help with the procrastination. Or you could always set up a desk area which looks super nice (this helped me as it made me feel comfortable and wanting to sit down at it).
Your revision techniques do look good, the main thing I would recommend is past paper questions which you can use to make sure the knowledge is sinking in/ areas you need to work on. Something I did that was helpful would be to make flash cards from a revision guide, then Iater on I would do past paper questions, the act of writing out flash cards in itself is learning content and then you can just test yourself on the content from then on. Another useful technique is blurting (credit to YouTuber Jade Bowler) where you essentially get a fresh piece of paper and write out everything you you know about a topic (useful to do after you’ve learnt the flash cards). Then you can check for any gaps in your knowledge. I would also highly recommend a revision timetable, this makes sure you cover all the possible content and also helps to reduce procrastination because you aren’t wasting time thinking of what to do. I hope this helps : )
Ah thank you! I was thinking of trying to go to my local library, but it's still a lengthy bus ride so it's just whether I'll be motivated enough. I will definitely check it out. As for the revision tips, they're actually fantastic, thank you. 'Blurting' particularly sounds effective!
Thank you so much
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Mhussein2001
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I'd recommend visiting a local library, or try listening to music (headphones) while you study/revise if it helps set the mood. Personally, I find that taking down a lot of notes and highlighting everything is unnecessary, and it takes a lot of precious time. I would try to cover all the material first and give extra time to the concepts that I struggle with in particular. Its extremely important to be in a stress-free mood when you study, so that you can do it efficiently. Skim through everything you know well quickly and pay more attention on concepts that you struggle with. Good luck !
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