The use of aren't vs. isn't in the English Language

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Louisecbr
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I have recently been noticing how people use aren't and isn't when speaking but have also seen it written and I am very interested in the correct usage.

From what I know, "aren't" would be used for plural and "isn't" would be used for singular. However I have seen "isn't" used where I think "aren't" should be used.

It's the same with "there're" and "there's" (in spoken). I often hear sentences such as "there's a lot of boats" or "there's a lot of people". Shouldn't these both be "there're" as in "there are"?

I have just today seen a BBC news post which said "Racing cars isn't just for guys.". This really made me think and want to ask people what is the correct way of using this? I would have said Racing cars AREN'T just for guys, because of racing cars being plural.

I know it's a tiny part of the language but I have noticed it so much recently that I would be really interested in what anyone has to say.

Thank you!
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Vinny C
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The apostrophe denotes absent letters. Isn't = is not. Aren't = are not. They're = they are. Their is a possessive adjective meaning belonging to them. Any more questions?
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Louisecbr
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Yes, thank you. I am aware of what you have explained but didn't think I needed to put that in the question with it being well known and that's not the question I was asking.

My question was about using aren't or isn't (are not or is not) because of how I have heard it being used (mostly in spoken as I mentioned) and there're and there's (there are and there is).

My main question is related to what the BBC posted today, is that correct or incorrect?
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bluebells1
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It should have been aren't. The guy probably just had a blip.
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gjd800
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The BBC one is easy to explain. They are not saying that racecars (plural entities) are not just for men, but that the activity of racing cars (singular action) is not reserved for men.
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seaholme
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(Original post by gjd800)
The BBC one is easy to explain. They are not saying that racecars (plural entities) are not just for men, but that the activity of racing cars (singular action) is not reserved for men.
This.
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username4169146
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when you have an -ing word (called a gerund) that is being used like a noun it follows the rule that it will usually be singular. e.g. racing cars isn't just for guys, listening to music is enjoyable, eating at different restaurants is fun, swimming in lakes is dangerous. The "racing" is the main subject of the sentence, and it's a gerund and gerunds as we know are almost always singular even if the object following them is plural,like in this case "cars." http://portlandenglish.edu/blog/gerund-subjects/
https://www.ef.co.uk/english-resourc...rammar/gerund/
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