MEDICINE 2019 ENTRY – Applications from outside the UK / International students

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Blue Peanut Medical Education
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There appears to be several students on TSR who are hoping to come to the UK to study medicine from abroad. We have taught such students in our own practice as medical students, and also at a postgraduate level when they become junior doctors. We find that there are usually no unusual concerns meeting the academic requirements. However, such candidates can come from different educational, cultural and linguistic backgrounds and this raises some challenges, mainly in medical school interviews.

Make sure you are aware of current hot topics, especially those facing the NHS. Current hot topics include 7 day working, the right of doctors to strike, brexit, recruitment crisis, antibiotic resistance etc. The NHS may have very different challenges to the healthcare system where you are currently studying.
We have significant problems with communication skills with some international candidates. This is especially acute when faced with MMI stations with real actors and conflict, challenge or the need to show empathy. You may come from a culture where no one challenges doctors and different ethical standards and boundaries.
Medical schools in some countries apply a very traditional method of learning with very little problem based learning unlike several UK medical schools. You will be expected to work well in a group as well as on your own. They can test some of the necessary skills for this in a group exercise. You may be familiar with all your assessments being written and now have to start getting accustomed to oral examinations with actors and simulated patients.
Work experience in a caring or medical environment abroad should not be a problem. Remember you need to relate what you observed and did, to the qualities of a doctor and show the admissions tutor that you have some of these qualities or the potential to develop them.
You will need a good command of the English language. Your accent and dialect etc. will not matter. If you have a disability, for example a speech impediment, start you answers by very briefly apologising and explaining your issues to the examiner.
Several cultures expect a prospective medical student to be a ‘bookworm’. Some medical schools may place a significant emphasis on activities outside academia as well as personal hobbies and interests.

Good luck in your application!

Blue Peanut Medical Education – We are doctors who help students get medical school places!
https://www.bluepeanut.co.uk
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Francesco8801
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(Original post by Blue Peanut Medical Education)
There appears to be several students on TSR who are hoping to come to the UK to study medicine from abroad. We have taught such students in our own practice as medical students, and also at a postgraduate level when they become junior doctors. We find that there are usually no unusual concerns meeting the academic requirements. However, such candidates can come from different educational, cultural and linguistic backgrounds and this raises some challenges, mainly in medical school interviews.

Make sure you are aware of current hot topics, especially those facing the NHS. Current hot topics include 7 day working, the right of doctors to strike, brexit, recruitment crisis, antibiotic resistance etc. The NHS may have very different challenges to the healthcare system where you are currently studying.
We have significant problems with communication skills with some international candidates. This is especially acute when faced with MMI stations with real actors and conflict, challenge or the need to show empathy. You may come from a culture where no one challenges doctors and different ethical standards and boundaries.
Medical schools in some countries apply a very traditional method of learning with very little problem based learning unlike several UK medical schools. You will be expected to work well in a group as well as on your own. They can test some of the necessary skills for this in a group exercise. You may be familiar with all your assessments being written and now have to start getting accustomed to oral examinations with actors and simulated patients.
Work experience in a caring or medical environment abroad should not be a problem. Remember you need to relate what you observed and did, to the qualities of a doctor and show the admissions tutor that you have some of these qualities or the potential to develop them.
You will need a good command of the English language. Your accent and dialect etc. will not matter. If you have a disability, for example a speech impediment, start you answers by very briefly apologising and explaining your issues to the examiner.
Several cultures expect a prospective medical student to be a ‘bookworm’. Some medical schools may place a significant emphasis on activities outside academia as well as personal hobbies and interests.

Good luck in your application!

Blue Peanut Medical Education – We are doctors who help students get medical school places!
https://www.bluepeanut.co.uk
That was very helpful, thanks!
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Sharini
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(Original post by Blue Peanut Medical Education)
There appears to be several students on TSR who are hoping to come to the UK to study medicine from abroad. We have taught such students in our own practice as medical students, and also at a postgraduate level when they become junior doctors. We find that there are usually no unusual concerns meeting the academic requirements. However, such candidates can come from different educational, cultural and linguistic backgrounds and this raises some challenges, mainly in medical school interviews.

Make sure you are aware of current hot topics, especially those facing the NHS. Current hot topics include 7 day working, the right of doctors to strike, brexit, recruitment crisis, antibiotic resistance etc. The NHS may have very different challenges to the healthcare system where you are currently studying.
We have significant problems with communication skills with some international candidates. This is especially acute when faced with MMI stations with real actors and conflict, challenge or the need to show empathy. You may come from a culture where no one challenges doctors and different ethical standards and boundaries.
Medical schools in some countries apply a very traditional method of learning with very little problem based learning unlike several UK medical schools. You will be expected to work well in a group as well as on your own. They can test some of the necessary skills for this in a group exercise. You may be familiar with all your assessments being written and now have to start getting accustomed to oral examinations with actors and simulated patients.
Work experience in a caring or medical environment abroad should not be a problem. Remember you need to relate what you observed and did, to the qualities of a doctor and show the admissions tutor that you have some of these qualities or the potential to develop them.
You will need a good command of the English language. Your accent and dialect etc. will not matter. If you have a disability, for example a speech impediment, start you answers by very briefly apologising and explaining your issues to the examiner.
Several cultures expect a prospective medical student to be a ‘bookworm’. Some medical schools may place a significant emphasis on activities outside academia as well as personal hobbies and interests.

Good luck in your application!

Blue Peanut Medical Education – We are doctors who help students get medical school places!
https://www.bluepeanut.co.uk
Very helpful tips. Thank you. Please keep posting here and give us suggestions.
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Blue Peanut Medical Education
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Thanks for the positive feedback. As the moment we will be focusing on UCAS personal statements, but will move to discuss MMI interviews shortly.

Keep an eye on our medical school blog at:-

https://www.bluepeanut.co.uk/medical-school-blog/

Blue Peanut Medical
https://www.bluepeanut.co.uk
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Novak22
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Thank you for starting a thread for internatinal students, any advise on where to apply with below grades.

IGCSE-7A* (phy chem bio maths ICT French business) 2B(Eng languages & Eng lit)
UKCAT - 2690 Band 1
AS - AAA Chem Bio Maths B - physics
A - Chem Bio Maths - predicted A*AA
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valdoan7
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Hi there ^^
I'd love some advice or other perspectives on my current situation with where to apply with my current qualifications. Currently, I'm a first year Biology major at a University of California campus taking Biology, Chemistry, and Economics during the fall semester. I graduated highschool in 2018 with a diploma, but I didn't take any APs(Yeah, that was not a wise move on my part). Instead, I took a few community college courses including Human Biology and Psychology.

I took the UKCAT and got a relatively low score, and I'm most likely not taking the BMAT. My scores were:
VR: 740
DM: 570
QR: 670
AR: 500
SJT: Band 3

I have a good amount of extracurriculars including volunteering in a hospital for 4 years, and going to Stanford leadership conferences on public health.
With all of the stuff listed above, does anyone think I'd have a shot with getting in anywhere to the UK for 2019 entry into Medicine? And if so, are there any recommendations on where to apply? A few friends have recommended Leicester, Bristol, and Sheffield, and I've emailed all 3(currently waiting on responses to see if my college/university courses can make up for the AP exams).
Thank you!
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Random_User123
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Browse the UK university leagues for the medicine course so you can see all the unis that offer it. Then if you are particularly interested go onto the uni's site and browse their entry requirements and other achievements which have to be completed to apply.
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ukprospective
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Hey

I am a Canadian gradute with a Bachelor's of Science in Biological Sciences four year undergraduate degree from 2013-2017 with a 3.3/4.0 cumulative GPA (2.1 upper second class) looking to apply to Leicester's 5 year program.


I scored 87% in my Biology IB year 12 course, 96% in my Chemistry IB year 12 course, 98% in my English IB year 12 course, 85% in my Social Studies year 12 course, 97% in my Math year 12 course, and 96% in my Work Experience year 12 options course. I completed year 12 with a cumulative GPA of 93.12.

My UKCAT scores were 2500 band 3, I am also applying to Leicester as a choice.

I used the scoring system on their website pdf link and found that to be really helpful. Have you tried it?
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NoIdeaWthImdoing
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Hi, I'm an international student here with the following stats:
IGCSE: 8A*s
AS level: 5As
A level predicted grades: 3A*s
UKCAT: Overall 2620 (top 29%) band 2
IELTS: 7.5 overall with 6.5 in writing
Work experience: Volunteer and shadowing GP for 2 weeks in clinic.
I already applied to Sheffield, East Anglia, Manchester and Queen's Belfast via UCAS. I'm worried about my IELTS 6.5 in writing grade but other than that I think the rest is pretty average, what unis are you guys interested in??
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geek1123
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Hi,
I am planning to apply to UK undergraduate medicine in 2020 and wanted to form like an online help thread so that we can establish a timeline(all the key dates for UKCAT,resources recommendations,universities and their entry requirements, study timetables and tips and tricks) as the process to be honest is overwhelming as an international student.
Hope to make a lot of new friends here

Cheers,
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geek1123
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Hi,
I was wondering if any current international students studying undergraduate medicine could help me navigate a few things about the application process as I am planning to apply for 2020 entry.

Cheers,
Overwhelmed Australian high school med enthusiast
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MedMom
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Hello Bluepeanut education,
What kind of advice can your service give for a Year 10 student and aspiring to go in Medicine?
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Medic Community
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(Original post by MedMom)
Hello Bluepeanut education,
What kind of advice can your service give for a Year 10 student and aspiring to go in Medicine?
Hi MedMom,

Apart from maintaining excellent grades at school, volunteering and shadowing will greatly. Not only in terms of the application but this allows the student to have a better understanding of what life as a doctor is like. We would advice trying to get shadowing oppurtunities in different settings such as care homes, GP clinics and hospital wards. Volunteering can also be another great way to make the application stand out. Volunteering with organisations such as UNICEF or similar organisations can also be a great conversation starter at the interview. Being in Year 10 is a bit too early to start preperation on the addmisions test, just enjoy school and find what aspect of medicine interests you the most.
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Novak22
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Any International Students have got interviews so far, please post so we all can be updated.
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Hammad Dogar
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I know a thread just like this exist but this one is for exclusively for international students.
If you have applied to UK universities as an international student for 2019 entry. Please tell me your statistics and choices and any updates from them.
Thank you.
Mine are :
UKCAT = 2320 Band 2
GCE O Level= 1 A* ,7 A, 1C
As Level = 3A, 1 B
A level predicted = 2A* , 1A
Choices: (received acknowledgement from all)
Manchester
Nottingham
Liverpool
Queen's University Belfast
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MasterofPotatoes
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Do UK universities offer internship years for their international students, in order for them to complete their medical degrees?

Particularly at present?
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Hammad Dogar
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(Original post by MasterofPotatoes)
Do UK universities offer internship years for their international students, in order for them to complete their medical degrees?

Particularly at present?
Absolutely yes. This is equivalent to the house job. This is usually a year long.
Last edited by Hammad Dogar; 2 years ago
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Billy Goats
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(Original post by Blue Peanut Medical Education)
There appears to be several students on TSR who are hoping to come to the UK to study medicine from abroad. We have taught such students in our own practice as medical students, and also at a postgraduate level when they become junior doctors. We find that there are usually no unusual concerns meeting the academic requirements. However, such candidates can come from different educational, cultural and linguistic backgrounds and this raises some challenges, mainly in medical school interviews.

Make sure you are aware of current hot topics, especially those facing the NHS. Current hot topics include 7 day working, the right of doctors to strike, brexit, recruitment crisis, antibiotic resistance etc. The NHS may have very different challenges to the healthcare system where you are currently studying.
We have significant problems with communication skills with some international candidates. This is especially acute when faced with MMI stations with real actors and conflict, challenge or the need to show empathy. You may come from a culture where no one challenges doctors and different ethical standards and boundaries.
Medical schools in some countries apply a very traditional method of learning with very little problem based learning unlike several UK medical schools. You will be expected to work well in a group as well as on your own. They can test some of the necessary skills for this in a group exercise. You may be familiar with all your assessments being written and now have to start getting accustomed to oral examinations with actors and simulated patients.
Work experience in a caring or medical environment abroad should not be a problem. Remember you need to relate what you observed and did, to the qualities of a doctor and show the admissions tutor that you have some of these qualities or the potential to develop them.
You will need a good command of the English language. Your accent and dialect etc. will not matter. If you have a disability, for example a speech impediment, start you answers by very briefly apologising and explaining your issues to the examiner.
Several cultures expect a prospective medical student to be a ‘bookworm’. Some medical schools may place a significant emphasis on activities outside academia as well as personal hobbies and interests.

Good luck in your application!

Blue Peanut Medical Education – We are doctors who help students get medical school places!
https://www.bluepeanut.co.uk
Thanks for this :-)
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BigBroaz
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Interview offer today from Leicester
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Hammad Dogar
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(Original post by BigBroaz)
Interview offer today from Leicester
congratulations!
what are your stats?
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