Mya.Ahmed18
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Is it better to do a joint psychology with sociology?
Do you get more well paid jobs offers with a bachelors of psychology with sociology or it is ok just to have psychology? as some universities I want to go to do not do psychology with sociology.
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random_matt
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Depends on what you want to do and what the modules are.
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Mya.Ahmed18
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(Original post by random_matt)
Depends on what you want to do and what the modules are.
But would you say there is more range of jobs with a joint degree
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random_matt
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Couldn't answer that, maybe someone else will chip in.
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Mya.Ahmed18
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(Original post by Bruce Norris)
If you are going the psychologist route. You need a BPS accredited course.
I know but that is quite a long route as you will need a PhD so I’m looking more into a psychotherapist so how would I become that?
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iammichealjackson
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(Original post by Mya.Ahmed18)
But would you say there is more range of jobs with a joint degree
You're talking about the two most common (and relatively least in demand) degrees. I dont think it will matter much overall in terms of employability. I think combining it with something like math or computer science would look great however.

If you want to get a good job after uni (and not necessarily in psychology) what matters is having relevant work experience (e.g. paid summer work experience), and good knowledge of the career/area you want to go into. Having good grades from a good universitywill just get you to the interview stage, most employers will be looking for more than that.
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Mya.Ahmed18
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(Original post by iammichealjackson)
You're talking about the two most common (and relatively least in demand) degrees. I dont think it will matter much overall in terms of employability. I think combining it with something like math or computer science would look great however.

If you want to get a good job after uni (and not necessarily in psychology) what matters is having relevant work experience (e.g. paid summer work experience), and good knowledge of the career/area you want to go into. Having good grades from a good universitywill just get you to the interview stage, most employers will be looking for more than that.
Thank you! I’m looking to be a psychotherapist, Do you know the steps of becoming one? I did check some websites but it confuses me and I was wondering if you can break it down for me if you know how to become one.
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Lord Asriel
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(Original post by Mya.Ahmed18)
Thank you! I’m looking to be a psychotherapist, Do you know the steps of becoming one? I did check some websites but it confuses me and I was wondering if you can break it down for me if you know how to become one.
It is confusing because the term "Psychotherapist" actually includes a lot of different training pathways and roles. It's not like becoming a medical doctor or Clinical Psychologist where there is a single route of entry. It's more like saying "I want to train to be writer", and then deciding if you want to specialise in fiction, technical writing, print journalism etc.

While all psychotherapists use psychological therapies to alleviate distress and promote wellbeing, they get there in different ways depending on the type of therapy you wish to provide. For Cognitive Behavioural Therapists you will need to do a training route that is recognised by the BABCP. If you wanted to be a psychodynamic therapist you would need accreditation by the UKCP or BACP. For Psychoanalysts you would need recognition from the British Psychoanalytic Council. For Family therapists you would need to do the AFT training route. Each of these routes is different and leads to different ways of working and these are "Pure" therapists (i.e. only focus on training you in providing psychotherapy).

There are other roles that also provide therapy such as Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry, but these professions have psychotherapy as one element of a much larger skillset (e.g. Clinical Psychology also trains you in neuropsychological testing, research and multiple therapeutic orientations at a basic level; Psychiatry has medication, diagnosis and so on). Again training is usually longer and more competitive for these roles.

There is no simple answer to your question, but it is incumbent on you to research each of the types of therapy, talk to a variety of therapists from different orientations and research the working conditions and pay for each,because there is such a variety and only you will know what suits you.
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Mya.Ahmed18
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(Original post by Lord Asriel)
It is confusing because the term "Psychotherapist" actually includes a lot of different training pathways and roles. It's not like becoming a medical doctor or Clinical Psychologist where there is a single route of entry. It's more like saying "I want to train to be writer", and then deciding if you want to specialise in fiction, technical writing, print journalism etc.

While all psychotherapists use psychological therapies to alleviate distress and promote wellbeing, they get there in different ways depending on the type of therapy you wish to provide. For Cognitive Behavioural Therapists you will need to do a training route that is recognised by the BABCP. If you wanted to be a psychodynamic therapist you would need accreditation by the UKCP or BACP. For Psychoanalysts you would need recognition from the British Psychoanalytic Council. For Family therapists you would need to do the AFT training route. Each of these routes is different and leads to different ways of working and these are "Pure" therapists (i.e. only focus on training you in providing psychotherapy).

There are other roles that also provide therapy such as Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry, but these professions have psychotherapy as one element of a much larger skillset (e.g. Clinical Psychology also trains you in neuropsychological testing, research and multiple therapeutic orientations at a basic level; Psychiatry has medication, diagnosis and so on). Again training is usually longer and more competitive for these roles.

There is no simple answer to your question, but it is incumbent on you to research each of the types of therapy, talk to a variety of therapists from different orientations and research the working conditions and pay for each,because there is such a variety and only you will know what suits you.
Thank you so much! Makes much more sense now.
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