Which are the best universities to study a Geology degree? Watch

zekegeo
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I'm looking to do a four year Master's next year (2019).

I've done a lot of research into different universities and narrowed it down to the Universities of East Anglia, Lancaster, Bristol, Exeter and Durham. I will be 27 by the time I start university next year and would like to feel I have made the right decision, since this is going to be my most important decision to date.
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yt7777
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What about Imperial College? - http://www.imperial.ac.uk/study/ug/c...t/geology-bsc/

They only require AAA (low for them) and are ranked 2nd in the UK for Geology only just behind Cambridge.

If not, (out of the ones you listed) I'd go with Durham.
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zekegeo
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(Original post by yt7777)
What about Imperial College? - http://www.imperial.ac.uk/study/ug/c...t/geology-bsc/

They only require AAA (low for them) and are ranked 2nd in the UK for Geology only just behind Cambridge.

If not, (out of the ones you listed) I'd go with Durham.
As good as the university is, I'm not a fan of London itself. Why would you choose Durham out of the choices that I listed?
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artful_lounger
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Ultimately it's subjective, however some fairly notable Earth Sciences departments outside of London I'm aware of are:

Oxbridge (Cambridge being via Natural Sciences, so having some additional considerations perhaps), Southampton (particularly for marine oriented things, although good generally), Bristol (especially for palaeobiology), Leeds (Geophysics/Petroleum Geology seem to be quite good there), and Manchester (generally, although they have a unique Geochemistry degree programme). You've already listed Bristol, but some of the others may also be of interest depending on what aspects of the subject you're interested in and/or predicted grade levels.

Of the ones you've noted, Durham I'm not that familiar with specifically for Earth Sciences but is well regarded in of itself. UEA seems to specialise in environmental earth sciences, and they appear to have a lot of options for that; they also have some oceanographic oriented options, and are probably one of the stronger universities outside Southampton to have much in this realm (most others seem to be limited to one or two options in the area).

Bristol is mentioned above; Exeter, for the Cornwall campus specifically seems to be very good; they have a range of more "applied" options in engineering geology and environmental geoscience, as well as some interesting things in renewable energy etc. I know two people who did degrees there (although neither specifically in Geology, but in allied areas) that really enjoyed their time there (this is for the Cornwall Campus only; the main campus, which I believe doesn't do Earth Sciences anyway, is another story entirely). I know next to nothing about Lancaster unfortunately.

In London, I do think it is worth noting Imperial, as above, as well as UCL, which outside of it's general "prestige" seems to have a good department with various "flavours" available; they have a pretty wide range of options across major subfields. Birkbeck is also quite notable, not only for having evening based courses (I believe) and part time options, for including the full amount of fieldwork recommended by the Geological Society of London (who I believe accredit degrees in the field, although I think the requirements for accreditation are lower than their recommended total amount).
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zekegeo
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Ultimately it's subjective, however some fairly notable Earth Sciences departments outside of London I'm aware of are:

Oxbridge (Cambridge being via Natural Sciences, so having some additional considerations perhaps), Southampton (particularly for marine oriented things, although good generally), Bristol (especially for palaeobiology), Leeds (Geophysics/Petroleum Geology seem to be quite good there), and Manchester (generally, although they have a unique Geochemistry degree programme). You've already listed Bristol, but some of the others may also be of interest depending on what aspects of the subject you're interested in and/or predicted grade levels.

Of the ones you've noted, Durham I'm not that familiar with specifically for Earth Sciences but is well regarded in of itself. UEL seems to specialise in environmental earth sciences, and they appear to have a lot of options for that; they also have some oceanographic oriented options, and are probably one of the stronger universities outside Southampton to have much in this realm (most others seem to be limited to one or two options in the area).

Bristol is mentioned above; Exeter, for the Cornwall campus specifically seems to be very good; they have a range of more "applied" options in engineering geology and environmental geoscience, as well as some interesting things in renewable energy etc. I know two people who did degrees there (although neither specifically in Geology, but in allied areas) that really enjoyed their time there (this is for the Cornwall Campus only; the main campus, which I believe doesn't do Earth Sciences anyway, is another story entirely). I know next to nothing about Lancaster unfortunately.

In London, I do think it is worth noting Imperial, as above, as well as UCL, which outside of it's general "prestige" seems to have a good department with various "flavours" available; they have a pretty wide range of options across major subfields. Birkbeck is also quite notable, not only for having evening based courses (I believe) and part time options, for including the full amount of fieldwork recommended by the Geological Society of London (who I believe accredit degrees in the field, although I think the requirements for accreditation are lower than their recommended total amount).
Thanks for your detailed response which has definitely revealed a lot. The Cornwall Campus does a Geology MSci which is what I would be looking to do. Lancaster, Bristol and UEA all stand out for the year abroad which would be huge to me. At least I didn't rush my decision and try to get into university this year. Manchester is another university that has caught my eye!
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ltsmith
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Edinburgh have a good geology department
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Sinnoh
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(Original post by zekegeo)
As good as the university is, I'm not a fan of London itself. Why would you choose Durham out of the choices that I listed?
Imperial is in a great location within London
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