Repopulate Scottish islands with trees! Watch

Trinculo
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#21
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#21
(Original post by Vinny C)
No... seen the size of Lewis and Harris? Would be considered an eco catastrophe if you depopulated Wales of all its trees. They seem to manage both sheep and trees without any difficulty.
I only ask because this thread seems like a long-game troll. Pretty much everything you’ve said is utter tripe.
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Vinny C
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#22
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#22
(Original post by Good bloke)
Is it? Who stole the island we used to own, Great Britain? That has to be the greatest land grab ever.

Not sure how Great Britain can steal a part of Great Britain... maybe the same mindset which says we can't have trees, they would upset our sheep. Just pointing out that Wales seem to manage both ok.
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Vinny C
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#23
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#23
(Original post by Trinculo)
I only ask because this thread seems like a long-game troll. Pretty much everything you’ve said is utter tripe.
Think you'll find that was Violet... we can't have trees, we keep sheep! In the Midlands, we have spent 20 yrs replanting the National Forest and it's doing wonders for both the environment and the countryside.
Last edited by Vinny C; 1 month ago
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Good bloke
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#24
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#24
(Original post by Vinny C)
Not sure how Great Britain can steal a part of Great Britain... maybe the same mindset which says we can't have trees, they would upset our sheep. Just pointing out that Wales seem to manage both ok.
The United Kingdom is not Great Britain. Great Britain is the largest island in the British isles that contains the bulk of the territory of England, Scotland and Wales. The United Kingdom also includes about 3,000 other islands and Northern Ireland.
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Vinny C
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#25
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#25
(Original post by Good bloke)
The United Kingdom is not Great Britain. Great Britain is the largest island in the British isles that contains the bulk of the territory of England, Scotland and Wales. The United Kingdom also includes about 3,000 other islands and Northern Ireland.
You seem to be claiming that costal islands are not part of Great Britain... beg to differ. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_..._Great_Britain
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OxFossil
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#26
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#26
(Original post by Vinny C)
Not sure how Great Britain can steal a part of Great Britain... maybe the same mindset which says we can't have trees, they would upset our sheep. Just pointing out that Wales seem to manage both ok.
Sadly, Wales' uplands are a "sheepwreck" - overgrazed and subject to severe soil erosion. Only by importing large quantities of supplemental feed can we keep that number of sheep on the land. Luckily, there is a growing movement supporting "rewilding", including a recent initiative funded by the Wales Wild Land Foundation, to return the land to more sustainable management. You probably know about a couple of the Scottish ones - like Rewilding Scotland. The biggest theft of the land probably took place during the enclosures of the 18th and 19th centuries, when around 7 million acres of common land in England and Wales, previously open for the use of peasants and the rural poor, was turned into the private property of the rich. As you know, in Scotland, the Highland Clearances of the 18th and 19th centuries involved the forced eviction of thousands of families, turning them out so as to make way for sheep. Scotland's treeless landscape is largely the legacy of this.
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Good bloke
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#27
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#27
(Original post by Vinny C)
You seem to be claiming that costal islands are not part of Great Britain... beg to differ. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_..._Great_Britain
Ahem. Great Britain is the name of one of the largest ten or so islands in the world. Great Britain is also used colloquially to mean the nation state of the UK and, often, the UK except NI. However, you didn't do that. You specifically said that Lewis & Harris is the largest island in the UK. The UK is not used colloquially to mean anything other than the UK - the country that comprises all the constituent islands plus NI.

The largest island in the UK is undoubtedly the island called Great Britain.
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Trinculo
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#28
(Original post by Vinny C)
Think you'll find that was Violet... we can't have trees, we keep sheep! In the Midlands, we have spent 20 yrs replanting the National Forest and it's doing wonders for both the environment and the countryside.
What I mean is that everything you have put in this thread is essentially nonsense.

You started it by saying that the Isles of Orkney and the Hebrides are treeless.

This is not true. There are trees in the Hebrides, on Lewis and Harris and on the Orkneys as well.

You make no effort to explore why these places might not be heavily forested. Perhaps because of the climate since the Bronze Age, rather than just human activity?

You make the bizarre claim that TSR is saving the planet because trees have been planted in Shetland and Stornoway in the last few months. There have been tree planting programmes in Shetland for decades, and in Stornoway for the better part of 200 years.
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Vinny C
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#29
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#29
(Original post by Trinculo)
What I mean is that everything you have put in this thread is essentially nonsense.

You started it by saying that the Isles of Orkney and the Hebrides are treeless.

This is not true. There are trees in the Hebrides, on Lewis and Harris and on the Orkneys as well.

You make no effort to explore why these places might not be heavily forested. Perhaps because of the climate since the Bronze Age, rather than just human activity?

You make the bizarre claim that TSR is saving the planet because trees have been planted in Shetland and Stornoway in the last few months. There have been tree planting programmes in Shetland for decades, and in Stornoway for the better part of 200 years.
They were practically treeless until recently... famous for it. Bronze age people deforested them and they were treeless for millennia. I never said that trees were only planted in the last few months... I said this post was only months old and hope it encourages more planting.
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Vinny C
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#30
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#30
(Original post by Good bloke)
Ahem. Great Britain is the name of one of the largest ten or so islands in the world. Great Britain is also used colloquially to mean the nation state of the UK and, often, the UK except NI. However, you didn't do that. You specifically said that Lewis & Harris is the largest island in the UK. The UK is not used colloquially to mean anything other than the UK - the country that comprises all the constituent islands plus NI.

The largest island in the UK is undoubtedly the island called Great Britain.
The island of Great Britain is as you describe. Politically and nationally however... Great Britain is understood to mean the mainland and its 6,000 plus offshore islands making Lewis and Harris unquestionably British by either definition.
Last edited by Vinny C; 1 month ago
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Trinculo
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#31
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#31
(Original post by Vinny C)
They were practically treeless until recently... famous for it. Bronze age people deforested them and they were treeless for millennia. I never said that trees were only planted in the last few months... I said this post was only months old and hope it encourages more planting.
This is pretty much the exact opposite of everything you've written in this thread so far.
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Vinny C
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#32
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#32
(Original post by Trinculo)
This is pretty much the exact opposite of everything you've written in this thread so far.
Happy to clarify... sorry for any misunderstanding. Exmoor and Dartmoor are exactly the same btw... deforested by Bronze Age peoples and never recovered from the exposure, didn't want Lewis and Harris going the same way. Trees protect land, environment and the soil, don't underestimate them. Without trees...
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Vinny C
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#33
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#33
(Original post by OxFossil)
Sadly, Wales' uplands are a "sheepwreck" - overgrazed and subject to severe soil erosion. Only by importing large quantities of supplemental feed can we keep that number of sheep on the land. Luckily, there is a growing movement supporting "rewilding", including a recent initiative funded by the Wales Wild Land Foundation, to return the land to more sustainable management. You probably know about a couple of the Scottish ones - like Rewilding Scotland. The biggest theft of the land probably took place during the enclosures of the 18th and 19th centuries, when around 7 million acres of common land in England and Wales, previously open for the use of peasants and the rural poor, was turned into the private property of the rich. As you know, in Scotland, the Highland Clearances of the 18th and 19th centuries involved the forced eviction of thousands of families, turning them out so as to make way for sheep. Scotland's treeless landscape is largely the legacy of this.
Fair comment... I started this thread to make amends and help the environment. Unfortunately, some see Scotland's treeless landscape as some fantasy I have created. Others see it as you are threatening our sheep! We all made mistakes... let's work together to correct them. Bronze age peoples caused massive deforestation... we just relocated the crofters, sorry.
Last edited by Vinny C; 1 month ago
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Good bloke
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#34
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#34
(Original post by Vinny C)
The island of Great Britain is as you describe. Politically and nationally however... Great Britain is understood to mean the mainland and its 6,000 plus offshore islands making Lewis and Harris unquestionably British by either definition.
Of course it is British. However, it is smaller than Great Britain (the island) and therefore not, as you claimed, the largest island in the UK.
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Andrew97
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#35
It’s really not that difficult.

Great Britain refers to the island most of us currently on.

The United Kingdom refers to Great Britian, Northern Ireland and many other smaller islands
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Vinny C
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#36
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#36
(Original post by Good bloke)
Of course it is British. However, it is smaller than Great Britain (the island) and therefore not, as you claimed, the largest island in the UK.
The largest offshore island then and yes... it was a good landgrab. Let's just get the trees back in spite of the sheep, lol.
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Quady
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#37
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#37
(Original post by Vinny C)
Ok so Stornoway disagrees too.

https://www.visitouterhebrides.co.uk...dlife/woodland[/QUOTE]

Nice to see my post is finally having some effect. Keep up the good work, guys. You can have trees and sheep, you know. Who the hell is Rosa Steppanova? She should be leading some metal rave band, lol.
What effect?
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Vinny C
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#38
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#38
(Original post by Quady)
https://www.visitouterhebrides.co.uk...dlife/woodland[/QUOTE[/url]]

Nice to see my post is finally having some effect. Keep up the good work, guys. You can have trees and sheep, you know. Who the hell is Rosa Steppanova? She should be leading some metal rave band, lol.
What effect?[/QUOTE]

Stornoway and Shetland starting to make an effort. I know 20yrs replanting is a pain in the butt but it's worth it... and imagine the jobs it creates.
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Violet Femme
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#39
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#39
(Original post by Vinny C)
Sheep chomp trees? Only the saplings so we place a little fence around them (the saplings, not the sheep).
20yrs later... a forest! Let them try to chomp on that.
They don't have to chomp them. Sheep are good at ring-barking trees by rubbing against them, which is why you'd need to retain fencing and manage it.

That costs money, so unless you can justify commercial use (certainly difficult in Shetland given increased costs of infrastructure/transport), you'll over ever see reforestation on a limited scale.
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Vinny C
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#40
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#40
(Original post by Violet Femme)
They don't have to chomp them. Sheep are good at ring-barking trees by rubbing against them, which is why you'd need to retain fencing and manage it.

That costs money, so unless you can justify commercial use (certainly difficult in Shetland given increased costs of infrastructure/transport), you'll over ever see reforestation on a limited scale.
Nvm… get an EU grant. Vote Remain!
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