umbrellala
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EPQ Tips, Advice, and Examples





This post is to give advice to anyone tackling an EPQ dissertation this year! I completed my EPQ in 2018 and got 48/54 for my unit mark and 23/28 overall which is 1 mark away from an A*. I learnt a lot along the way and I’m sure I could’ve achieved a higher mark if I’d followed all of the advice I am about to give from the get-go. If anyone else has any tips, please leave them in the replies. I will also be giving you my full dissertation, project proposal, powerpoint and bibliography to use as examples since I know it’s hard to find them online. Let’s start with the advice!


1. Preliminary research is vital
This is the number one thing I wish I had been told when I started my EPQ. As soon as you sign up for it and have an idea of the general area you want to research, start looking online to see what kind of things people have written about before, what relevant articles there are, which topics are popular and current etc. There’s no need to write down links or anything like that at this stage unless you start finding some good sources, but just start getting a feel of the subject area and what’s available to you. If you pick your question and then realise there’s not much writing that’s been done on your topic, it will take you a while to realise that and then you will have wasted a lot of time which could’ve been spent doing actual meaningful research. Any prelim research you do will really help to shape your question into something that’s realistic work-wise and is well-informed. It will also give you a head-start when it comes to the main bulk of your research because you’ll already know what to look for and understand the context of your topic much better.



2. Don’t let your first draft question limit your research
Your teachers will probably get you to write your first draft question relatively early on and encourage you to ‘finalise’ it before your start writing. I can’t emphasise enough that your initial question DOES NOT have to be your final, finished question. It can be changed up until the day you hand in your work for marking, so keep that in mind throughout the process. If you are researching and your find another avenue that you’d rather explore than what’s outlined in your question, don’t let your question limit you and explore other areas too. Just because it’s not directly addressing your question doesn’t mean it can’t bring something really valuable to your arguments, or if you’re early enough in the process it could even lead to a more interesting question and dissertation.



3. Get a good note-taking system as soon as possible
Having a method to keep your notes all in order and easy to read/use is so important. I went through several methods during the first month or so of my research, and once I had found the right system it made my writing process a hundred times easier. Just having a way to note down your thoughts will make putting them down on paper a lot simpler and will ensure you don’t forget anything that’s vital to your question. Your notes are where it all starts and are what will carry you through the whole year you’re working on it so take the time to make them as functional as possible!



4. When you’re told to reference from the very start, do it and make sure you’re doing it properly
You will probably be told this many, many times but it is so key to your EPQ. Referencing everything properly is half the struggle of writing a dissertation and takes a surprising amount of time and effort. Once you’re into your actual research (ie. not prelim), every single thing you read during your research must be recorded, regardless of whether you use it or not. More importantly, you must also note down the author, publication date, access date etc. Some types of sources are more difficult to reference than others, such as quotes from interviews published in magazines or sources online that just don’t have a publication date anywhere at all which is incredibly frustrating but all part of the process. As long as you do it all properly as you go along, it should be relatively easy to do and won’t be much of a burden. If you leave it to the last minute however, it will be an absolutely mammoth task (as my friend found out who was doing a medicine-related EPQ. She had over 100 sources to reference in the space of 2 days. She ended up almost handing it in late).



5. Put as much detail into your log as possible
Examiners like to see that you’re reflecting on everything you’re doing and how you’re trying to improve. Even if you’re not reflecting on yourself much at all, do take the time to fill up your activity log and try to add detail wherever possible. It is tedious and feels unnecessary at times, but it really does make a lot of difference to your grade and is worth your time. I added entries to my log every two weeks, and I would recommend doing it every two weeks as an absolute minimum.




6. Set yourself deadlines and stick to them
Your time management skills will make or break your dissertation. If you can do it well, then you’ll have the time to fully think through all of your arguments and make the most of the research that you’ve done. If you can’t do it well, everything will be rushed and a lot more stressful than it needs to be. Making your own deadlines means that you can factor in everything else you have going on and still get things done. Targets are the key to success when it comes to things like this!




7. But also don’t get too hung up on deadlines, especially those set by your tutor/mentor
Yes, meeting your deadlines is something that is assessed and has the potential to impact your grade, however it’s not life-and-death if you miss them. As long as you explain to your mentor why you can’t meet a deadline then they should be understanding, as long as you’re not doing it with every deadline you’re set. They should understand that there are so many other things going on and you have 3 other subjects that will often have to take priority over your EPQ. Don’t get too stressed about it because at the end of the day, missing your deadlines is only going to get a mark or two at most taken from your total.




8. Go paperless
At the start of my EPQ, I bought loads of cute folders and filing systems, I’d printed off my first few sources, and I had all the pretty highlighters you could ever want. I ended up using them for the first week and then gave up. At the end of the day, it doesn’t make much sense at all to do things on paper because it’s so much easier to do your actual dissertation writing online where it can be edited as much as you want and won’t ever get lost. Especially when you’re using online sources, you can copy and paste in direct quotes and easily organise everything you need to. All of my note-taking, annotating, and writing was done on my laptop and most of it through google drive. It means your writing is saved as you’re writing it (you don’t even have to hit save), it can be accessed from whatever computer I’m using whether at school or at home, and I can even work on it whilst I’m out and about through my phone. You might think it would be annoying to annotate articles and things like that one a computer but it’s actually very convenient. I’ll link examples of how I make my notes and used my sources below!




9. Make the most of the opportunity
Writing an EPQ is probably the best decision I’ve made in my school career. It gave me a huge advantage when applying to unis, I learned so many skills that are invaluable, and it was so fulfilling to write. It’s so nice to have the opportunity to write and learn about something that you enjoy and you are genuinely interested in, and to be given the free-rein to do it essentially however you’d like to. Enjoy it and good luck!






EXAMPLES
I’ve made a google drive folder containing my project proposal, full EPQ document, bibliography, presentation, and examples showing how I used my sources and wrote my notes. Please read the indicated document before you use them as it’s incredibly important you understand how they are intended to be used. If there are any issues accessing the documents or you want to ask me anything about them, please PM me here! Click on my account name, then under ‘My Contact Info’ you can select to send me a private message. The google drive folder can be found here.


P.S. Mods please tell me if I'm not allowed to post EPQ examples here! As far as I'm aware, it is allowed from the searching I have done. I asked a member of the support team but they were unsure. Please correct me if I'm wrong and I will remove them immediately
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TSR Jessica
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leche_frita1
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thanks a lot, it would help me. I am currently doing my EPQ in Spanish History. Do you have by chance your log?
my teacher doesn't help me much
I am his 4th student doing an EPQ
(Original post by umbrellala)




EPQ Tips, Advice, and Examples





This post is to give advice to anyone tackling an EPQ dissertation this year! I completed my EPQ in 2018 and got 48/54 for my unit mark and 23/28 overall which is 1 mark away from an A*. I learnt a lot along the way and I’m sure I could’ve achieved a higher mark if I’d followed all of the advice I am about to give from the get-go. If anyone else has any tips, please leave them in the replies. I will also be giving you my full dissertation, project proposal, powerpoint and bibliography to use as examples since I know it’s hard to find them online. Let’s start with the advice!


1. Preliminary research is vital
This is the number one thing I wish I had been told when I started my EPQ. As soon as you sign up for it and have an idea of the general area you want to research, start looking online to see what kind of things people have written about before, what relevant articles there are, which topics are popular and current etc. There’s no need to write down links or anything like that at this stage unless you start finding some good sources, but just start getting a feel of the subject area and what’s available to you. If you pick your question and then realise there’s not much writing that’s been done on your topic, it will take you a while to realise that and then you will have wasted a lot of time which could’ve been spent doing actual meaningful research. Any prelim research you do will really help to shape your question into something that’s realistic work-wise and is well-informed. It will also give you a head-start when it comes to the main bulk of your research because you’ll already know what to look for and understand the context of your topic much better.



2. Don’t let your first draft question limit your research
Your teachers will probably get you to write your first draft question relatively early on and encourage you to ‘finalise’ it before your start writing. I can’t emphasise enough that your initial question DOES NOT have to be your final, finished question. It can be changed up until the day you hand in your work for marking, so keep that in mind throughout the process. If you are researching and your find another avenue that you’d rather explore than what’s outlined in your question, don’t let your question limit you and explore other areas too. Just because it’s not directly addressing your question doesn’t mean it can’t bring something really valuable to your arguments, or if you’re early enough in the process it could even lead to a more interesting question and dissertation.



3. Get a good note-taking system as soon as possible
Having a method to keep your notes all in order and easy to read/use is so important. I went through several methods during the first month or so of my research, and once I had found the right system it made my writing process a hundred times easier. Just having a way to note down your thoughts will make putting them down on paper a lot simpler and will ensure you don’t forget anything that’s vital to your question. Your notes are where it all starts and are what will carry you through the whole year you’re working on it so take the time to make them as functional as possible!



4. When you’re told to reference from the very start, do it and make sure you’re doing it properly
You will probably be told this many, many times but it is so key to your EPQ. Referencing everything properly is half the struggle of writing a dissertation and takes a surprising amount of time and effort. Once you’re into your actual research (ie. not prelim), every single thing you read during your research must be recorded, regardless of whether you use it or not. More importantly, you must also note down the author, publication date, access date etc. Some types of sources are more difficult to reference than others, such as quotes from interviews published in magazines or sources online that just don’t have a publication date anywhere at all which is incredibly frustrating but all part of the process. As long as you do it all properly as you go along, it should be relatively easy to do and won’t be much of a burden. If you leave it to the last minute however, it will be an absolutely mammoth task (as my friend found out who was doing a medicine-related EPQ. She had over 100 sources to reference in the space of 2 days. She ended up almost handing it in late).



5. Put as much detail into your log as possible
Examiners like to see that you’re reflecting on everything you’re doing and how you’re trying to improve. Even if you’re not reflecting on yourself much at all, do take the time to fill up your activity log and try to add detail wherever possible. It is tedious and feels unnecessary at times, but it really does make a lot of difference to your grade and is worth your time. I added entries to my log every two weeks, and I would recommend doing it every two weeks as an absolute minimum.




6. Set yourself deadlines and stick to them
Your time management skills will make or break your dissertation. If you can do it well, then you’ll have the time to fully think through all of your arguments and make the most of the research that you’ve done. If you can’t do it well, everything will be rushed and a lot more stressful than it needs to be. Making your own deadlines means that you can factor in everything else you have going on and still get things done. Targets are the key to success when it comes to things like this!




7. But also don’t get too hung up on deadlines, especially those set by your tutor/mentor
Yes, meeting your deadlines is something that is assessed and has the potential to impact your grade, however it’s not life-and-death if you miss them. As long as you explain to your mentor why you can’t meet a deadline then they should be understanding, as long as you’re not doing it with every deadline you’re set. They should understand that there are so many other things going on and you have 3 other subjects that will often have to take priority over your EPQ. Don’t get too stressed about it because at the end of the day, missing your deadlines is only going to get a mark or two at most taken from your total.




8. Go paperless
At the start of my EPQ, I bought loads of cute folders and filing systems, I’d printed off my first few sources, and I had all the pretty highlighters you could ever want. I ended up using them for the first week and then gave up. At the end of the day, it doesn’t make much sense at all to do things on paper because it’s so much easier to do your actual dissertation writing online where it can be edited as much as you want and won’t ever get lost. Especially when you’re using online sources, you can copy and paste in direct quotes and easily organise everything you need to. All of my note-taking, annotating, and writing was done on my laptop and most of it through google drive. It means your writing is saved as you’re writing it (you don’t even have to hit save), it can be accessed from whatever computer I’m using whether at school or at home, and I can even work on it whilst I’m out and about through my phone. You might think it would be annoying to annotate articles and things like that one a computer but it’s actually very convenient. I’ll link examples of how I make my notes and used my sources below!




9. Make the most of the opportunity
Writing an EPQ is probably the best decision I’ve made in my school career. It gave me a huge advantage when applying to unis, I learned so many skills that are invaluable, and it was so fulfilling to write. It’s so nice to have the opportunity to write and learn about something that you enjoy and you are genuinely interested in, and to be given the free-rein to do it essentially however you’d like to. Enjoy it and good luck!






EXAMPLES
I’ve made a google drive folder containing my project proposal, full EPQ document, bibliography, presentation, and examples showing how I used my sources and wrote my notes. Please read the indicated document before you use them as it’s incredibly important you understand how they are intended to be used. If there are any issues accessing the documents or you want to ask me anything about them, please PM me here! Click on my account name, then under ‘My Contact Info’ you can select to send me a private message. The google drive folder can be found here.


P.S. Mods please tell me if I'm not allowed to post EPQ examples here! As far as I'm aware, it is allowed from the searching I have done. I asked a member of the support team but they were unsure. Please correct me if I'm wrong and I will remove them immediately
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umbrellala
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(Original post by leche_frita1)
thanks a lot, it would help me. I am currently doing my EPQ in Spanish History. Do you have by chance your log?
my teacher doesn't help me much
I am his 4th student doing an EPQ
Sorry I took so long to reply, I'm at university now so it was a bit of a struggle to find it! But yes, I've added it to the google drive I linked in the original post. Good luck
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leche_frita1
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#5
thanks a lot
(Original post by umbrellala)
Sorry I took so long to reply, I'm at university now so it was a bit of a struggle to find it! But yes, I've added it to the google drive I linked in the original post. Good luck
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teni2001
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Thank you so much. I found the advice really useful. My EPQ is due next week so I'm just trying to refine it now. Would you say that the examiner cares more about your journey (production log, evaluating) or the actual essay? Also, how many sources would you recommend I use because I've looked at other examples and realized that I have significantly less (around 20 but most sources are long academic papers).
(Original post by umbrellala)




EPQ Tips, Advice, and Examples





This post is to give advice to anyone tackling an EPQ dissertation this year! I completed my EPQ in 2018 and got 48/54 for my unit mark and 23/28 overall which is 1 mark away from an A*. I learnt a lot along the way and I’m sure I could’ve achieved a higher mark if I’d followed all of the advice I am about to give from the get-go. If anyone else has any tips, please leave them in the replies. I will also be giving you my full dissertation, project proposal, powerpoint and bibliography to use as examples since I know it’s hard to find them online. Let’s start with the advice!


1. Preliminary research is vital
This is the number one thing I wish I had been told when I started my EPQ. As soon as you sign up for it and have an idea of the general area you want to research, start looking online to see what kind of things people have written about before, what relevant articles there are, which topics are popular and current etc. There’s no need to write down links or anything like that at this stage unless you start finding some good sources, but just start getting a feel of the subject area and what’s available to you. If you pick your question and then realise there’s not much writing that’s been done on your topic, it will take you a while to realise that and then you will have wasted a lot of time which could’ve been spent doing actual meaningful research. Any prelim research you do will really help to shape your question into something that’s realistic work-wise and is well-informed. It will also give you a head-start when it comes to the main bulk of your research because you’ll already know what to look for and understand the context of your topic much better.



2. Don’t let your first draft question limit your research
Your teachers will probably get you to write your first draft question relatively early on and encourage you to ‘finalise’ it before your start writing. I can’t emphasise enough that your initial question DOES NOT have to be your final, finished question. It can be changed up until the day you hand in your work for marking, so keep that in mind throughout the process. If you are researching and your find another avenue that you’d rather explore than what’s outlined in your question, don’t let your question limit you and explore other areas too. Just because it’s not directly addressing your question doesn’t mean it can’t bring something really valuable to your arguments, or if you’re early enough in the process it could even lead to a more interesting question and dissertation.



3. Get a good note-taking system as soon as possible
Having a method to keep your notes all in order and easy to read/use is so important. I went through several methods during the first month or so of my research, and once I had found the right system it made my writing process a hundred times easier. Just having a way to note down your thoughts will make putting them down on paper a lot simpler and will ensure you don’t forget anything that’s vital to your question. Your notes are where it all starts and are what will carry you through the whole year you’re working on it so take the time to make them as functional as possible!



4. When you’re told to reference from the very start, do it and make sure you’re doing it properly
You will probably be told this many, many times but it is so key to your EPQ. Referencing everything properly is half the struggle of writing a dissertation and takes a surprising amount of time and effort. Once you’re into your actual research (ie. not prelim), every single thing you read during your research must be recorded, regardless of whether you use it or not. More importantly, you must also note down the author, publication date, access date etc. Some types of sources are more difficult to reference than others, such as quotes from interviews published in magazines or sources online that just don’t have a publication date anywhere at all which is incredibly frustrating but all part of the process. As long as you do it all properly as you go along, it should be relatively easy to do and won’t be much of a burden. If you leave it to the last minute however, it will be an absolutely mammoth task (as my friend found out who was doing a medicine-related EPQ. She had over 100 sources to reference in the space of 2 days. She ended up almost handing it in late).



5. Put as much detail into your log as possible
Examiners like to see that you’re reflecting on everything you’re doing and how you’re trying to improve. Even if you’re not reflecting on yourself much at all, do take the time to fill up your activity log and try to add detail wherever possible. It is tedious and feels unnecessary at times, but it really does make a lot of difference to your grade and is worth your time. I added entries to my log every two weeks, and I would recommend doing it every two weeks as an absolute minimum.




6. Set yourself deadlines and stick to them
Your time management skills will make or break your dissertation. If you can do it well, then you’ll have the time to fully think through all of your arguments and make the most of the research that you’ve done. If you can’t do it well, everything will be rushed and a lot more stressful than it needs to be. Making your own deadlines means that you can factor in everything else you have going on and still get things done. Targets are the key to success when it comes to things like this!




7. But also don’t get too hung up on deadlines, especially those set by your tutor/mentor
Yes, meeting your deadlines is something that is assessed and has the potential to impact your grade, however it’s not life-and-death if you miss them. As long as you explain to your mentor why you can’t meet a deadline then they should be understanding, as long as you’re not doing it with every deadline you’re set. They should understand that there are so many other things going on and you have 3 other subjects that will often have to take priority over your EPQ. Don’t get too stressed about it because at the end of the day, missing your deadlines is only going to get a mark or two at most taken from your total.




8. Go paperless
At the start of my EPQ, I bought loads of cute folders and filing systems, I’d printed off my first few sources, and I had all the pretty highlighters you could ever want. I ended up using them for the first week and then gave up. At the end of the day, it doesn’t make much sense at all to do things on paper because it’s so much easier to do your actual dissertation writing online where it can be edited as much as you want and won’t ever get lost. Especially when you’re using online sources, you can copy and paste in direct quotes and easily organise everything you need to. All of my note-taking, annotating, and writing was done on my laptop and most of it through google drive. It means your writing is saved as you’re writing it (you don’t even have to hit save), it can be accessed from whatever computer I’m using whether at school or at home, and I can even work on it whilst I’m out and about through my phone. You might think it would be annoying to annotate articles and things like that one a computer but it’s actually very convenient. I’ll link examples of how I make my notes and used my sources below!




9. Make the most of the opportunity
Writing an EPQ is probably the best decision I’ve made in my school career. It gave me a huge advantage when applying to unis, I learned so many skills that are invaluable, and it was so fulfilling to write. It’s so nice to have the opportunity to write and learn about something that you enjoy and you are genuinely interested in, and to be given the free-rein to do it essentially however you’d like to. Enjoy it and good luck!






EXAMPLES
I’ve made a google drive folder containing my project proposal, full EPQ document, bibliography, presentation, and examples showing how I used my sources and wrote my notes. Please read the indicated document before you use them as it’s incredibly important you understand how they are intended to be used. If there are any issues accessing the documents or you want to ask me anything about them, please PM me here! Click on my account name, then under ‘My Contact Info’ you can select to send me a private message. The google drive folder can be found here.


P.S. Mods please tell me if I'm not allowed to post EPQ examples here! As far as I'm aware, it is allowed from the searching I have done. I asked a member of the support team but they were unsure. Please correct me if I'm wrong and I will remove them immediately
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teni2001
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I forgot to ask you what are the key things that need to be included in your EPQ to get high marks
(Original post by teni2001)
Thank you so much. I found the advice really useful. My EPQ is due next week so I'm just trying to refine it now. Would you say that the examiner cares more about your journey (production log, evaluating) or the actual essay? Also, how many sources would you recommend I use because I've looked at other examples and realized that I have significantly less (around 20 but most sources are long academic papers).
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umbrellala
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(Original post by teni2001)
Thank you so much. I found the advice really useful. My EPQ is due next week so I'm just trying to refine it now. Would you say that the examiner cares more about your journey (production log, evaluating) or the actual essay? Also, how many sources would you recommend I use because I've looked at other examples and realized that I have significantly less (around 20 but most sources are long academic papers).
The content of the essay is important, but you have to keep in mind that the people reading your essay are highly unlikely to have specialist knowledge in the area you're talking about. As long as they can see that you have a well though-out and well-formed essay with proper referencing, that's all that really matters. They are very interested in seeing your progress and what you've learned throughout, so whilst both are really important I'd say that the process of writing your essay is slightly more important. That being said, I'm not an examiner so I can't say for sure, that's just the impression I got from my tutors.

I had quite a long bibliography, as you can see, but I used around 35 sources actually in my essay. My sources were mainly a mix of news articles and academic papers. I don't think the number of sources you used is that important (and if you're just refining now then there's not really a way to force more in) but they will want to see a variety of sources and formats which are referenced correctly.

(Original post by teni2001)
I forgot to ask you what are the key things that need to be included in your EPQ to get high marks
Again, I'm not an examiner so I can't really comment on that. I'd recommend looking at mark schemes, they have a lot of advice and I believe they also have some example specimens? As for general advice, an essay which shows you've put a lot of thought into your arguments and have backed them up well will get you a lot of marks. The EPQ qualification is less about what your subject matter is, but more about learning how to write extended academic pieces, like the ones you'd have to write at university. So the structure and thought behind it is most important.
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teni2001
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Thank you for the advice. I would greatly appreciate if you completed my survey for my EPQ on economic growth at https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/TKDKZJN
Simply copy and paste it into your browser and feel free to message me if you have any problems. Thank you again for the tips. Your thread was really helpful
(Original post by umbrellala)
The content of the essay is important, but you have to keep in mind that the people reading your essay are highly unlikely to have specialist knowledge in the area you're talking about. As long as they can see that you have a well though-out and well-formed essay with proper referencing, that's all that really matters. They are very interested in seeing your progress and what you've learned throughout, so whilst both are really important I'd say that the process of writing your essay is slightly more important. That being said, I'm not an examiner so I can't say for sure, that's just the impression I got from my tutors.

I had quite a long bibliography, as you can see, but I used around 35 sources actually in my essay. My sources were mainly a mix of news articles and academic papers. I don't think the number of sources you used is that important (and if you're just refining now then there's not really a way to force more in) but they will want to see a variety of sources and formats which are referenced correctly.


Again, I'm not an examiner so I can't really comment on that. I'd recommend looking at mark schemes, they have a lot of advice and I believe they also have some example specimens? As for general advice, an essay which shows you've put a lot of thought into your arguments and have backed them up well will get you a lot of marks. The EPQ qualification is less about what your subject matter is, but more about learning how to write extended academic pieces, like the ones you'd have to write at university. So the structure and thought behind it is most important.
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AmyH122
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Thank you for this its really helpful. I've just been accepted onto an EPQ program but just wondered if a live presentation has to be done? My college didn't mention anything about it but I've seen a few articles where its a requirement to make a presentation. Thanks!
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umbrellala
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(Original post by AmyH122)
Thank you for this its really helpful. I've just been accepted onto an EPQ program but just wondered if a live presentation has to be done? My college didn't mention anything about it but I've seen a few articles where its a requirement to make a presentation. Thanks!
No problem! Personally a live presentation was a requirement for my course, however I did do it 2017/18 and I believe the syllabus has changed since then, and it might differ between exam boards. You'll be able to find your answer if you find your exam board's syllabus online
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