Year off after GCSE's- what to do now?

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ishroca
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#1
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#1
Last year after I received my GCSE results (RS: A*, English Lang 9, English Lit 8, Maths 5, Chemistry and Biology C) I started studying a Level 3 course I didn't enjoy, and promptly quit the course and entered full time work.

I've decided to go back this year and study A levels. However, I'm finding it very hard to pick my options.

I'm fairly certain on wanting to study Psychology and Philosophy, though stuck on the other two AS I will be taking.
I've been researching, geography, business, and English Language and Literature. I was wondering if anyone with subject knowledge of these subjects could give me any advice on the subjects, as well as not taking them at GCSE would impact me at all.

I would like to keep my options open for university, as well as having some subjects that neatly tie in together.

I have an idea that I would like to study psychology at university however this may well change.

In my year off I got a taste for business due to working on meeting targets, talking with customers to open credit accounts, and I did really enjoy it. However my maths grade is not the best, though at A level in my sixth form it's mandatory to take a Level 3 maths in context course.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated, thank you!

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kekedoyouloveme?
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#2
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#2
psychology is an interesting subject, a lot of my friends enjoy it there is a bit of maths tied into psychology in my school you needed a 6 in maths to do pyschology, philosophy is also good, you'll enjoy it (I do philosophy at A-level tied in with ethics. What would you need advice on? the other two a levels? I'm kinda confused..
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ishroca
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#3
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(Original post by kekedoyouloveme?)
psychology is an interesting subject, a lot of my friends enjoy it there is a bit of maths tied into psychology in my school you needed a 6 in maths to do pyschology, philosophy is also good, you'll enjoy it (I do philosophy at A-level tied in with ethics. What would you need advice on? the other two a levels? I'm kinda confused..
I do enjoy maths, though I didn't get a particularly high grade at GCSE so I was wondering how much that would affect my chance at getting a high grade at psychology. The place I'm going to is pretty helpful as they do offer a Level 3 course which is similar to an AS level in maths alongside subjects like psychology, business and economics so hopefully that'll help bridge the gap between GCSE and a level.

How do you find philosophy? Any tips for someone who's going to be studying it, what are the exams like, and what sort of things should I be doing to get the highest grades possible?

Yeah I was looking for some advice on what other two a levels to take, as I've had a year off education and keeping my GCSE results in mind as well. I'd like to try and start off the courses as prepared as possible as I did most of the course content for my GCSE's in 4/5 months and I believe I would've got higher results if I'd been prepared and spanned them over the full two years.
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kekedoyouloveme?
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#4
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(Original post by ishroca)
I do enjoy maths, though I didn't get a particularly high grade at GCSE so I was wondering how much that would affect my chance at getting a high grade at psychology. The place I'm going to is pretty helpful as they do offer a Level 3 course which is similar to an AS level in maths alongside subjects like psychology, business and economics so hopefully that'll help bridge the gap between GCSE and a level.

How do you find philosophy? Any tips for someone who's going to be studying it, what are the exams like, and what sort of things should I be doing to get the highest grades possible?

Yeah I was looking for some advice on what other two a levels to take, as I've had a year off education and keeping my GCSE results in mind as well. I'd like to try and start off the courses as prepared as possible as I did most of the course content for my GCSE's in 4/5 months and I believe I would've got higher results if I'd been prepared and spanned them over the full two years.
as long as you practice your maths like the level-3 bit then you should be fine, maths doesn't play a huge weighing factor when it comes to psychology, so it won't affect your chances of achieving high grades, you just need to be prepared when it comes to learning the content, in psychology there is a lot to learn, but not too worry, as long as you stay on top of your work you should be fine.
Philosophy for me so far is fine, we haven't studied the A2 content yet, it isn't tricky in terms of exam questions, just make sure you get familiar with the type of exam questions that your school tests you on, again quite a bit of content in philosophy but nothing that isn't managable . Tips are: to remember quotes from important philosophers, to remember key terms like (analytic statement, deductive arguments) you'll understand the terms when you begin studying it. Timed essays are important for philosophy, do timed essays before an exam, it will help you when it comes to actually writing an essay in exams, other than that Philosophy is like memorising the key features in every topic, the scholars, and quotes from a topic.

what is it that your passionate about? I mean you got very very good English grades both in lit and lang (I got both 7's) perhaps take English Literature, I mean if you enjoyed English Literature at GCSE then you should enjoy it at A-level, again in English you have to learn quotes from books and all that jazz its the same as GCSE English, so if you're prepared to learn quotes from books, then you should be fine. My other advice was take something that you enjoy and that you were good at, it should be a balance between enjoyment and being good at a particular subject. Perhaps do Econ, or Business A-level since you learnt a bit about the business world on your year out, and if it's something that your passionate in then business is another great option, it's a reasonable easy A-level my friends got A'S in both Econ and Business AS, but again just keep practicing your maths alongside these types of A-levels and you should be fine.
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ishroca
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#5
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(Original post by kekedoyouloveme?)
Philosophy for me so far is fine, we haven't studied the A2 content yet, it isn't tricky in terms of exam questions, just make sure you get familiar with the type of exam questions that your school tests you on, again quite a bit of content in philosophy but nothing that isn't managable . Tips are: to remember quotes from important philosophers, to remember key terms like (analytic statement, deductive arguments) you'll understand the terms when you begin studying it. Timed essays are important for philosophy, do timed essays before an exam, it will help you when it comes to actually writing an essay in exams, other than that Philosophy is like memorising the key features in every topic, the scholars, and quotes from a topic.

what is it that your passionate about? I mean you got very very good English grades both in lit and lang (I got both 7's) perhaps take English Literature, I mean if you enjoyed English Literature at GCSE then you should enjoy it at A-level, again in English you have to learn quotes from books and all that jazz its the same as GCSE English, so if you're prepared to learn quotes from books, then you should be fine. My other advice was take something that you enjoy and that you were good at, it should be a balance between enjoyment and being good at a particular subject. Perhaps do Econ, or Business A-level since you learnt a bit about the business world on your year out, and if it's something that your passionate in then business is another great option, it's a reasonable easy A-level my friends got A'S in both Econ and Business AS, but again just keep practicing your maths alongside these types of A-levels and you should be fine.
What exam board were you under for philosophy? Also how did you revise for the exams, was it mostly past papers?

English really has been my strong subject for all my life, I don't know why I'm not as interested anymore. I should really take it though, as they were my highest grades, and I was one mark off an 8 in English Lit, it was sent off for remark but they couldn't find an extra mark to give me. Do you know much about English Language & Literature as a combined subject?

I really love learning about people, minds, I'm quite inquisitive, I like the deeper meaning behind things, I love analysing and writing and trying to understand the 'why' questions. I'm also passionate about the environment, I like learning about it hence why geography is thrown into the mix.

Do you know much about the difference between Econ and business? Or which one is more useful, or better for UCAS and such?

Thank you for taking so much time to write about the subjects, I really appreciate it (:
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kekedoyouloveme?
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#6
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#6
We did Eduqas for philosophy, best ways of revising is making flashcards of quotations, easy way to memorize, I did mindmaps after each topic my teacher said mindmaps were really good when it came to revising for philosophy, anything that I couldn't remember I searched up in the textbook. I made notes on every topic printed them off and learnt all of my notes, like off by heart.

if you love analysing, perhaps English will be quite good for you, have you spoke to any friends? teachers? see what they would advise you to do. Econ is more maths based I think, quite a lot of my friends do maths and Econ it coincides a lot with maths, so if you don't think that you would be up to doing Econ maybe do Business studies, one of my friends says business was suited for her because she got a 5 in maths. Business is l less theoretical, Economics is like a social science its about consumers, workers and how the government have an affect on the community business is like decisions made by important firms, accounting management strategies.
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