ADVICE NEEDED: Which masters degree & Uni?

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mariasanchez1234
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I just graduated from the University of Westminster with a 1st in my Law LLB degree and I want to get a masters degree. I have considered the following universities and master programmes and would like some of your opinions on the degrees and their respective providers.

I chose such different degrees because I am not set on which job I want to do after I graduate, so I would appreciate if someone could tell me which of the following would be the best programmes in terms of job options. I have thought about applying for the HMRC Graduate Programme (Tax Professional) and later on pursue a career in the City, or maybe try to work in Consulting (but how realistic is that for me?).

Background: EU student, AAB at A-Levels, fluent in 3 languages, only have legal work experience but will be doing the Vodafone Explore Internship for 5 months working in Finance, HR, Marketing, Sales, etc. (rotating and working in different departments).

• Oxford: MSc Law and Finance

• LSE: MSc Law and Accounting

• University of Warwick: LLM International Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation

• QMUL:
- LLM Banking and Finance Law
- MSc Law and Finance
- LLM Law and Economics

• University of London, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies: LLM International Corporate Governance, Financial Regulation and Economic Law

• Brunel University London: LLM International Financial Regulation and Corporate Law

Just give me some of your opinions and please don't be too cruel.
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mariasanchez1234
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anyone?
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User8612
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First, why do want to do a Masters degree? You don't need one to get onto a Graduate Scheme, and it is a significant financial burden for a one year programme which most universities see as cash cows. Each of the programmes you list include a law element (which you already have as you have an LLB), and the other element is finance, econ, or accounting. The knowledge of each of these fields you are likely to get in training on a Graduate Scheme in finance, banking, consulting, etc. So why the need for a Masters?
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mariasanchez1234
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(Original post by User8612)
First, why do want to do a Masters degree? You don't need one to get onto a Graduate Scheme, and it is a significant financial burden for a one year programme which most universities see as cash cows. Each of the programmes you list include a law element (which you already have as you have an LLB), and the other element is finance, econ, or accounting. The knowledge of each of these fields you are likely to get in training on a Graduate Scheme in finance, banking, consulting, etc. So why the need for a Masters?
Thank you very much for your reply.

As I said, I am an EU student. It is true that I plan on staying in the UK and working there but I don't know if my circumstances change and I decide/have to go back to my home country. Masters degrees are not needed in the UK but that is not the case in many European countries. All the "good" companies in my country only hire people with Masters degrees, it is expected of students to get a Masters degree and its something everyone has. If I don't they will either not consider me or I will be at a huge disadvantage.

I am going to be honest, I did not enjoy studying law but it is something I am good at, that's why I chose the Masters I named above. I am truly interested in the "finance, accounting, etc." side of those degrees but since that is something very unknown to me I want to keep the "law" element of it so I know I can at least excel on that.

When it comes to the financial burden of a Masters degree that is, thank god, at the moment not a problem.
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User8612
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(Original post by mariasanchez1234)
Thank you very much for your reply.

As I said, I am an EU student. It is true that I plan on staying in the UK and working there but I don't know if my circumstances change and I decide/have to go back to my home country. Masters degrees are not needed in the UK but that is not the case in many European countries. All the "good" companies in my country only hire people with Masters degrees, it is expected of students to get a Masters degree and its something everyone has. If I don't they will either not consider me or I will be at a huge disadvantage.

I am going to be honest, I did not enjoy studying law but it is something I am good at, that's why I chose the Masters I named above. I am truly interested in the "finance, accounting, etc." side of those degrees but since that is something very unknown to me I want to keep the "law" element of it so I know I can at least excel on that.

When it comes to the financial burden of a Masters degree that is, thank god, at the moment not a problem.
Well then, you should apply to all of the programmes that you listed, and then make a decision from the ones that offer you a place. Unlike for undergraduate applications, there is no limit to the number of universities you can apply to. If you like the look of each of those programmes, then you should apply to all of them. You may not be offered a place at all of them, but then that gives you a smaller list to choose from
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mariasanchez1234
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(Original post by User8612)
Well then, you should apply to all of the programmes that you listed, and then make a decision from the ones that offer you a place. Unlike for undergraduate applications, there is no limit to the number of universities you can apply to. If you like the look of each of those programmes, then you should apply to all of them. You may not be offered a place at all of them, but then that gives you a smaller list to choose from
Thank you very much for your reply.

Yes, I guess I am going to apply first and then choose from the ones that accept me, but that is going to be a really hard choice since I do not know what I should prioritise in my decision-making process. Should I choose the most well-regarded masters in terms of its name and content? Should I go to the University I like the most? Should I prioritise University ranking? Should I go for my favourite masters degree regardless of any of that?

I am sorry for asking all these questions, I struggle with severe anxiety and feel like I need to have some certainty and control over this topic asap.
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El Salvador
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I don't know the particulars of those courses, but I'll point out the fact that at Oxford, the BCL is the prestigious/popular one, even though it's not technically titled as a master's degree (but instead as a "Bachelor of Civil Law" at master's level of accreditation).
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(Original post by mariasanchez1234)
Thank you very much for your reply.

Yes, I guess I am going to apply first and then choose from the ones that accept me, but that is going to be a really hard choice since I do not know what I should prioritise in my decision-making process. Should I choose the most well-regarded masters in terms of its name and content? Should I go to the University I like the most? Should I prioritise University ranking? Should I go for my favourite masters degree regardless of any of that?

I am sorry for asking all these questions, I struggle with severe anxiety and feel like I need to have some certainty and control over this topic to get it out of my head.
You've indicated that the reason for getting a Masters is to keep open your option of returning home and getting a good job. Since that is the main reason, it would make sense to choose the highest ranking university out of the ones that accept you. But, bear in mind also that you will be spending a year on whichever course you choose and so you also want to choose a course that you will actually be motivated to work for - so make sure you do your research into the structure of each programme that you are accepted to, what modules you will have to take, and what optional modules you can choose from.
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mariasanchez1234
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(Original post by The Champion.m4a)
I don't know the particulars of those courses, but I'll point out the fact that at Oxford, the BCL is the prestigious/popular one, even though it's not technically titled as a master's degree (but instead as a "Bachelor of Civil Law" at master's level of accreditation).
Thank you very much for the suggestion. I appreciate the advice but I looked into that course before and I honestly don't think it's something I would enjoy studying.
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El Salvador
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(Original post by mariasanchez1234)
Thank you very much for the suggestion. I appreciate the advice but I looked into that course before and I honestly don't think it's something I would enjoy studying.
OK. Just thought I'd throw it out there. The BCL is overall, counting all levels, the second most popular course at Oxford as I recall, behind only the MBA.

But ultimately I think - I'm not certain - the different courses suit people who wish to go for different careers.
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mariasanchez1234
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(Original post by User8612)
You've indicated that the reason for getting a Masters is to keep open your option of returning home and getting a good job. Since that is the main reason, it would make sense to choose the highest ranking university out of the ones that accept you. But, bear in mind also that you will be spending a year on whichever course you choose and so you also want to choose a course that you will actually be motivated to work for - so make sure you do your research into the structure of each programme that you are accepted to, what modules you will have to take, and what optional modules you can choose from.
Yes, but to be honest for my home country any of the Masters will do. The thing is I want to stay in the UK and work there, so since I am going to do a Masters might as well be the best possible one I can do.

So your ultimate advice would be to choose the highest ranked uni from the ones that accept me, keeping in mind the structure of the programme?

And once again, thank you very much for your reply.
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Scotney
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(Original post by User8612)
You've indicated that the reason for getting a Masters is to keep open your option of returning home and getting a good job. Since that is the main reason, it would make sense to choose the highest ranking university out of the ones that accept you. But, bear in mind also that you will be spending a year on whichever course you choose and so you also want to choose a course that you will actually be motivated to work for - so make sure you do your research into the structure of each programme that you are accepted to, what modules you will have to take, and what optional modules you can choose from.
This poster is giving you absolutely the right advice .Keep calm and be grateful you have the financial backing for the masters.
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mariasanchez1234
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(Original post by Scotney)
This poster is giving you absolutely the right advice .Keep calm and be grateful you have the financial backing for the masters.
Thank you very much I will do my best and I am grateful.
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username2320815
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You might find the process of applying for each course quite useful for helping you come to a decision. When I was applying for masters and writing personal statements for each different course, it really made me see a pattern in terms of which modules and topics I was interested in, the programme structures I preferred and so on. I ended up not applying to several programmes I'd originally planned to because I realised they weren't actually such a good fit. Perhaps you would find the process helpful also
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mariasanchez1234
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(Original post by laebae)
You might find the process of applying for each course quite useful for helping you come to a decision. When I was applying for masters and writing personal statements for each different course, it really made me see a pattern in terms of which modules and topics I was interested in, the programme structures I preferred and so on. I ended up not applying to several programmes I'd originally planned to because I realised they weren't actually such a good fit. Perhaps you would find the process helpful also
Thank you so much, that is great advice, I'm sure it will bring me some clarity
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