mickybooth
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Hi all!

I am currently approaching Year 13 so I'm finalising my university preferences, but one thing I ran into was the fact that I didn't know whether to choose MSci or BSc Psychology.

I know that MSci is a Masters degree and would provide an additional year opposed to BSc which is a Bachelors degree.

However my question is, how are MSci courses funded? Are they funded just like a BSc or would be or is it a whole different process?

Thanks in advance guys!
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anossia
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Following this thread as I’m wondering this myself 😂
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mickybooth
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(Original post by anossia)
Following this thread as I’m wondering this myself 😂
Haha welcome!
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Ol94
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didnt mean to click thread, but as here ppl tend to **** psychology off as a bs degree which is interesting. why do u want to study it and what want to achieve from it
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random_matt
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It's not a masters degree, it's a masters of science degree which is four years, BSc is three years.
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Doones
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(Original post by mickybooth)
However my question is, how are MSci courses funded? Are they funded just like a BSc or would be or is it a whole different process?
An MSci is a 4 year undergraduate masters (also called an integrated masters) and is fully funded by SFE on the same basis as the BSc. It's fine from a funding point of view.
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anossia
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(Original post by mickybooth)
Hi all!

I am currently approaching Year 13 so I'm finalising my university preferences, but one thing I ran into was the fact that I didn't know whether to choose MSci or BSc Psychology.

I know that MSci is a Masters degree and would provide an additional year opposed to BSc which is a Bachelors degree.

However my question is, how are MSci courses funded? Are they funded just like a BSc or would be or is it a whole different process?

Thanks in advance guys!
Just researched it and as it’s not a fully qualified masters degree ;as it’s an undergraduate masters (hell yaaaaas this sounds good), it’s funded through student loans and is guaranteed government funding. Hope this helps!
(Original post by Ol94)
didnt mean to click thread, but as here ppl tend to **** psychology off as a bs degree which is interesting. why do u want to study it and what want to achieve from it
I studied it as GCSE and Alevel (obviously) along with law as I want to help abused children hands on as well as helping these kids out in court cases. Prior experiences in my childhood have lead me to determine psychologists wrong in some theories they may have about these children like heck, they won’t go far in life; if that’s for everyone why am I a good student . I work my arse off for everything I do so I’m going to prove that theory wrong especially as I know several kids with the same outcome more or less as me. Apart from that side of things, I find it really interesting so I want to delve further into the world of psychology. At the end of the day, my primary goal is to help children ^^ Agreed people do tend to to that on here with psychology but sometimes people need to take off their rose tinted glasses and look at the real picture. For example, just because that person doesn’t like psychology doesn’t mean they should deter others from doing it .
Sorry for the long message 😂
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Doones
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(Original post by anossia)
Just researched it and as it’s not a fully qualified masters degree
On what basis do you mean it's not fully qualified?

e.g. Bristol's MSci *is* fully qualified "against the requirements for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) of the British Psychological Society (BPS)."
http://www.bristol.ac.uk/study/under...ci-psychology/
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anossia
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I mean that it’s not a full masters degree ; it’s an undergraduate masters degree. After the MSci, you go for the full masters afterwards. It’s like a basis to prepare you for masters I think. Sorry for my error 😂😅
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Doones
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(Original post by anossia)
I mean that it’s not a full masters degree ; it’s an undergraduate masters degree. After the MSci, you go for the full masters afterwards. It’s like a basis to prepare you for masters I think. Sorry for my error 😂😅
Psychology is not my area but are you absolutely sure about that?

For example MMath (4 year Maths degree), MEng (4 year Engineering degree) or MSci Physics (4 year Physics degree) are all accepted as equivalent to a BSc + MSc. You don't need a MSc on top of an MEng to become a chartered engineer.
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A Rolling Stone
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(Original post by mickybooth)
Hi all!

I am currently approaching Year 13 so I'm finalising my university preferences, but one thing I ran into was the fact that I didn't know whether to choose MSci or BSc Psychology.

I know that MSci is a Masters degree and would provide an additional year opposed to BSc which is a Bachelors degree.

However my question is, how are MSci courses funded? Are they funded just like a BSc or would be or is it a whole different process?

Thanks in advance guys!
for psych i would defiinitely recommend the masters. psych degrees have notorious career prospects without accompanying work experience (partly due to an oversupply of graduates) so having a masters will definitely make up for that and bolster your prospects for the future
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Doones
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(Original post by CollectiveSoul)
for psych i would defiinitely recommend the masters. psych degrees have notorious career prospects without accompanying work experience (partly due to an oversupply of graduates) so having a masters will definitely make up for that and bolster your prospects for the future
Ok but what about MSci vs BSc+MSc ?
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random_matt
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
Ok but what about MSci vs BSc+MSc ?
There the same, if I'm wrong tell me otherwise.
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Doones
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(Original post by random_matt)
There the same, if I'm wrong tell me otherwise.
That's my view too :yep: (i.e. academically equivalent, but not funding-wise.)
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A Rolling Stone
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
Ok but what about MSci vs BSc+MSc ?
that good would be fine, as long as the intention is always to do a masters for psych!
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random_matt
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
That's my view too :yep: (i.e. academically equivalent, but not funding-wise.)
How would funding work? SFE pay the usual three years and the forth year works how?
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Doones
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(Original post by random_matt)
How would funding work? SFE pay the usual three years and the forth year works how?
SFE pays the total length of the course (+1 *gift year) so a 4 year MSci is fully funded for 4 years.

If it's a BSc plus MSc then SFE pays the 3 years for the BSc (tuition plus maintenance) but for the MSc you only get a postgrad loan (£10.6k but no maintenance loan).

*The gift year is in case you fail a year or change course and restart. You get 1 extra year allowed for that.
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PsychoD
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I would recommend completing your BSc and then pursuing a separate masters degree. An MSCi is not equivalent to an MSc, as the former is a level 6.5, latter is a 7 and a Bsc is a 6. I have heard of individuals going back home from university in the UK to Asia (mainly) and being rejected from Masters level positions solely because the employer does not believe a level 6.5 education counts as a masters (7). Also generally, from my own opinion, saying that one has a Bsc in X and a masters in Y sounds better than I have an MSCi in X.

I'm going to edit this and specify that the issues that I know occur have been in the context of applying to graduate positions abroad (non-UK). This is likely because the MSCi is relatively new, and not all employers abroad know they exist/care enough to review it.
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random_matt
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
SFE pays the total length of the course (+1 *gift year) so a 4 year MSci is fully funded for 4 years.

If it's a BSc plus MSc then SFE pays the 3 years for the BSc (tuition plus maintenance) but for the MSc you only get a postgrad loan (£10.6k but no maintenance loan).

*The gift year is in case you fail a year or change course and restart. You get 1 extra year allowed for that.
Gotcha, is that 10.6 the average masters cost? I'll assume if you find a cheaper post grad degree, SFE would just pay that and you would not get paid the difference in what you could call a maintenance loan, hope you know what I mean.
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Doones
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(Original post by random_matt)
Gotcha, is that 10.6 the average masters cost? I'll assume if you find a cheaper post grad degree, SFE would just pay that and you would not get paid the difference in what you could call a maintenance loan, hope you know what I mean.
It's a flat rate no matter what the course costs, and it's not means-tested. So yes any extra goes towards accommodation etc.

https://www.gov.uk/masters-loan
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