Is it better for your first degree to be more general?

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theeetimdoherty
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Hi!
Would it not be an advantage to study a less specific degree at first?

I'm thinking about applying to philosophy, politics and economics (PPE) which is three areas in one degree, so naturally it'd cover a wide range of material. However, if I also applied to study just economics, I'd be only doing one thing, and wouldn't have as wide a career path. And, if I studied PPE, I could later do a Masters in economics, rather than just doing a Bachelors in economics first.

What do you think?
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PQ
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There’s no careers available to PPE graduates that aren’t also available to Economics graduates.

Choose a subject that you will be enthusiastic and motivated to study so that you can stick with it and get the best results possible.
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fabragas27
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(Original post by theeetimdoherty)
Hi!
Would it not be an advantage to study a less specific degree at first?

I'm thinking about applying to philosophy, politics and economics (PPE) which is three areas in one degree, so naturally it'd cover a wide range of material. However, if I also applied to study just economics, I'd be only doing one thing, and wouldn't have as wide a career path. And, if I studied PPE, I could later do a Masters in economics, rather than just doing a Bachelors in economics first.

What do you think?
Companies do not want people that are "all rounded", they want people that have specific skills in order to make revenue from those skills.

For example:
A surgeon and a mechanic have more in common than you might actually think. Both of these jobs have a specific skill that a company NEEDS in order to make revenue for the company. A surgeon has a skill in cutting people up and fixing them up again, and a mechanic has a skill of fixing up cars.

Now, you need to get into a degree or a trade that gives you a skill that companies are willing to pay you for and that are in demand.

Here are the following degrees that are only worth going to University for:
1) Medicine
2) Nursing
3) Computer Science
4) Engineering
5) Accounting/Actuarial Science.
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Student-95
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(Original post by fabragas27)
Companies do not want people that are "all rounded", they want people that have specific skills in order to make revenue from those skills.

For example:
A surgeon and a mechanic have more in common than you might actually think. Both of these jobs have a specific skill that a company NEEDS in order to make revenue for the company. A surgeon has a skill in cutting people up and fixing them up again, and a mechanic has a skill of fixing up cars.

Now, you need to get into a degree or a trade that gives you a skill that companies are willing to pay you for and that are in demand.

Here are the following degrees that are only worth going to University for:
1) Medicine
2) Nursing
3) Computer Science
4) Engineering
5) Accounting/Actuarial Science.
Except the vast majority of graduate jobs don't require a specific degree.
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PQ
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(Original post by fabragas27)
Companies do not want people that are "all rounded", they want people that have specific skills in order to make revenue from those skills.

For example:
A surgeon and a mechanic have more in common than you might actually think. Both of these jobs have a specific skill that a company NEEDS in order to make revenue for the company. A surgeon has a skill in cutting people up and fixing them up again, and a mechanic has a skill of fixing up cars.

Now, you need to get into a degree or a trade that gives you a skill that companies are willing to pay you for and that are in demand.

Here are the following degrees that are only worth going to University for:
1) Medicine
2) Nursing
3) Computer Science
4) Engineering
5) Accounting/Actuarial Science.
Who hurt you?
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fabragas27
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(Original post by PQ)
Who hurt you?
Ah yes, the truth does hurt.
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username1230881
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(Original post by fabragas27)
Ah yes, the truth does hurt.
Your list doesn't make sense. Surely Law should be on that list, and considering teaching is a graduate profession, that should be considered too (so a wide range there, unless you want non-graduate teachers...), the world needs historians etc.
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fabragas27
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(Original post by doctorwhofan98)
Your list doesn't make sense. Surely Law should be on that list, and considering teaching is a graduate profession, that should be considered too (so a wide range there, unless you want non-graduate teachers...), the world needs historians etc.
Law is extremely over saturated, its only worth pursuing law if you are studying it in the top 5 Law Universities or if you surname is Rockefeller, otherwise forget it. Moreover, teachers get paid peanuts, they are over worked and frankly, they will never be able to pay back their loans while they are earning a measly 27k pre tax.

The world doesn't need historians, you have the internet to read up about history and almost everything else. For crying out loud I know almost everything about the Crusades from just listening to an audio book while I'm working out at the gym. Want to learn about philosophy? Go to a library and get a book about Socrates or Kant and just bloody well read that instead of blowing 27k on University without any job prospects at the end of it, and then just leaving all the mess to the hardworking tax payers. Have some respect.
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username1230881
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(Original post by fabragas27)
Law is extremely over saturated, its only worth pursuing law if you are studying it in the top 5 Law Universities or if you surname is Rockefeller, otherwise forget it. Moreover, teachers get paid peanuts, they are over worked and frankly, they will never be able to pay back their loans while they are earning a measly 27k pre tax.

The world doesn't need historians, you have the internet to read up about history and almost everything else. For crying out loud I know almost everything about the Crusades from just listening to an audio book while I'm working out at the gym. Want to learn about philosophy? Go to a library and get a book about Socrates or Kant and just bloody well read that instead of blowing 27k on University without any job prospects at the end of it, and then just leaving all the mess to the hardworking tax payers. Have some respect.
Law is indeed oversaturated, that is a fair enough point. But teachers' pay and workload doesn't negate their need to be qualified. And I'm sure History and Philosophy professors would completely agree with your comments - after all, those books write themselves! Yes, most people studying Philosophy and History won't go into academia, but point arguably isn't the knowledge that they gain (which they'll probably forget the moment they leave the exam hall), but rather the transferable skills. University is a different world to A levels.

We're clearly not going to agree, and I understand your general point that some degrees aren't worth studying for compared to either getting a job or doing an apprenticeship, but I think it's unnecessarily over the top to claim that most degrees are absolutely useless.
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PQ
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(Original post by fabragas27)
Law is extremely over saturated, its only worth pursuing law if you are studying it in the top 5 Law Universities or if you surname is Rockefeller, otherwise forget it. Moreover, teachers get paid peanuts, they are over worked and frankly, they will never be able to pay back their loans while they are earning a measly 27k pre tax.

The world doesn't need historians, you have the internet to read up about history and almost everything else. For crying out loud I know almost everything about the Crusades from just listening to an audio book while I'm working out at the gym. Want to learn about philosophy? Go to a library and get a book about Socrates or Kant and just bloody well read that instead of blowing 27k on University without any job prospects at the end of it, and then just leaving all the mess to the hardworking tax payers. Have some respect.
And yet computer Science has the highest unemployment rate....
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(Education was 3%, law was 4%....)
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fabragas27
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(Original post by PQ)
And yet computer Science has the highest unemployment rate....
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(Education was 3%, law was 4%....)
Last time I checked you didn't have to re-learn whole subjects if you were teaching or if you had re-write all the laws and re-learn them again. Whereas, I'm pretty sure in computer science there are new languages, new scripts/engines and as soon as you jump out of University, whatever you have learned will become "old" and the latest engine will result in your having to learn it from scratch, hence taking more time, and therefore employers wanting graduates being up to date constantly.

Hence, professional development and having a good portfolio of knowing languages, engines and scripting makes it infinitely more difficult than just pontificating the same subject content to a class of kids and also pontificating the same Acts and laws to a judge.

Take your pick. With the advancements in technology and software engineering being required, you're a fool to patronise computer science.
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PQ
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(Original post by fabragas27)
Last time I checked you didn't have to re-learn whole subjects if you were teaching or if you had re-write all the laws and re-learn them again. Whereas, I'm pretty sure in computer science there are new languages, new scripts/engines and as soon as you jump out of University, whatever you have learned will become "old" and the latest engine will result in your having to learn it from scratch, hence taking more time, and therefore employers wanting graduates being up to date constantly.

Hence, professional development and having a good portfolio of knowing languages, engines and scripting makes it infinitely more difficult than just pontificating the same subject content to a class of kids and also pontificating the same Acts and laws to a judge.

Take your pick. With the advancements in technology and software engineering being required, you're a fool to patronise computer science.
Keep digging
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