Part Time Masters Opportunity... too soon after Bachelors Degree? Watch

Lottie1997
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 6 months ago
#1
Hi, I have recently graduated from my BA (Hons) in Architecture but do not want to pursue this in the future. Instead I would like to focus on urban planning and creating diverse and accepting cities.

A wonderful opportunity has arisen for me to potentially get a full time job in a local authority doing urban planning and be put through a part time master’s degree on day release, fully funded. The MA would also be in urban design.

I fully understand that this is an amazing opportunity to move quickly up the ladder in my desired field but I had an extremely negative experience at university and have lingering feelings about my willingness to go back so quickly and subject myself to this kind of environment again.

During the course of my BA I began to have some mental health issues around my own self confidence and belief in my self-worth brought on by staff - supposedly there to help - repeatedly telling me that I wasn't working hard enough or long enough hours and that my work wasn't worth looking at. This led to comments such as "You'll never be good enough to pursue this field".

It has taken time to come to terms with and be proud of my degree and myself and I'm not sure I want to give that up. I have been told that part time learning is different, that the teaching is better and suited to people who work hard, which I have always done. I am still reminded that this is exactly what was said going into my BA.

Has anyone/is anyone doing this kind of MA and have any advice or information which would help me make the right decision? I know that if I pass up this opportunity there might not be another and it might set me back a long time in qualifying.
0
reply
cuppa
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#2
Report 6 months ago
#2
Are you likely to get a place/already have a place? If so, then I believe you have a good chance at doing well. It is of course unfortunate that your BA kind of is putting you off, but if this is in a different institution, then chances are that the experience will be different too. If it's the same institution, it is still a very different kind of degree (especially when part time), and your BA experiences shouldn't be reflected. You can always apply for help from the wellbeing services at the uni, which they should happily provide for you.
0
reply
threeportdrift
  • Community Assistant
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#3
Report 6 months ago
#3
(Original post by Lottie1997)
.............
I can't speak for your preferences or the specifics of either the employer or the Masters course or University, but in my experience, doing a degree part time and working at the same time is an entirely different experience to an undergrad or even a full time postgrad experience. I did a part time Masters degree at the same University I went on to do a full time PhD at, and the experiences were entirely different in the same institution.
0
reply
Lottie1997
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 6 months ago
#4
(Original post by cuppa)
Are you likely to get a place/already have a place? If so, then I believe you have a good chance at doing well. It is of course unfortunate that your BA kind of is putting you off, but if this is in a different institution, then chances are that the experience will be different too. If it's the same institution, it is still a very different kind of degree (especially when part time), and your BA experiences shouldn't be reflected. You can always apply for help from the wellbeing services at the uni, which they should happily provide for you.
I have an interview coming up, which has prompted the questions. I do not know how to respond should they offer me the place and - for obvious reasons - I need to have it sorted in my head before then. It is in a different university as well, one much closer to home with what looks like a much better support system and a much smaller cohort. Probably around 20-30 people as opposed to 200.
0
reply
Lottie1997
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 6 months ago
#5
(Original post by threeportdrift)
I can't speak for your preferences or the specifics of either the employer or the Masters course or University, but in my experience, doing a degree part time and working at the same time is an entirely different experience to an undergrad or even a full time postgrad experience. I did a part time Masters degree at the same University I went on to do a full time PhD at, and the experiences were entirely different in the same institution.
Would you mind expanding a little further? How did you find the part time masters? I don't really know anyone who has done anything similar hence me reaching out for advice.
0
reply
cuppa
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#6
Report 6 months ago
#6
(Original post by Lottie1997)
I have an interview coming up, which has prompted the questions. I do not know how to respond should they offer me the place and - for obvious reasons - I need to have it sorted in my head before then. It is in a different university as well, one much closer to home with what looks like a much better support system and a much smaller cohort. Probably around 20-30 people as opposed to 200.
Master's are always meant to be more personal, which means the support, as you're aware, will be more present. I think that if it's only the poor BA experience that is putting you off, then you should probably give it a go. At the end of the day, you will not lose anything (in the sense of money, more than anything), and will gain experience, which will help you immensely.

If you were to do the same thing in a few years you might find yourself a bit disinterested, as time can do that. So I think give it a go Very good luck to you in the interview if you decide to go through with it x
0
reply
threeportdrift
  • Community Assistant
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#7
Report 6 months ago
#7
(Original post by Lottie1997)
Would you mind expanding a little further? How did you find the part time masters? I don't really know anyone who has done anything similar hence me reaching out for advice.
My job was going through a rubbish period at the time, so the part-time Masters was great. In terms of headspace I found them interestingly different. The challenge was partitioning time and genuinely focussing on study for the amount of time needed. However, if your employer is sponsoring you as part of the employment package, they are likely to be much more accommodating about giving sufficient time to focus.

Don't under-estimate the amount of time it takes to get back into the academic study groove every time you need to. It takes at least a half hour, possible up to an hour to get back to where you left off last time, if you can't leave your books etc open at the same place. So putting an hour aside every night doesn't work, it takes about a 3 hour chunk to get useful work done.
0
reply
Lottie1997
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 6 months ago
#8
(Original post by cuppa)
Master's are always meant to be more personal, which means the support, as you're aware, will be more present. I think that if it's only the poor BA experience that is putting you off, then you should probably give it a go. At the end of the day, you will not lose anything (in the sense of money, more than anything), and will gain experience, which will help you immensely.

If you were to do the same thing in a few years you might find yourself a bit disinterested, as time can do that. So I think give it a go Very good luck to you in the interview if you decide to go through with it x
Thank you ! I didn't want to miss the opportunity entirely which is why I applied in the first place but as it approaches the lingering doubt is getting stronger. It was just such a negative atmosphere and contributed to me being unable to believe that I would be good at anything for a while afterwards.
0
reply
Lottie1997
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 6 months ago
#9
(Original post by threeportdrift)
My job was going through a rubbish period at the time, so the part-time Masters was great. In terms of headspace I found them interestingly different. The challenge was partitioning time and genuinely focussing on study for the amount of time needed. However, if your employer is sponsoring you as part of the employment package, they are likely to be much more accommodating about giving sufficient time to focus.

Don't under-estimate the amount of time it takes to get back into the academic study groove every time you need to. It takes at least a half hour, possible up to an hour to get back to where you left off last time, if you can't leave your books etc open at the same place. So putting an hour aside every night doesn't work, it takes about a 3 hour chunk to get useful work done.
Okay, that's helpful, thank you. I've never struggled to summon the determination and focus needed to study effectively or to organise my time. During my BA I had two part time jobs to support myself financially so I am used to that working and studying mix. For me it will be a new job with funded study including some coursework time in work as well as day release to attend my contact hours.
0
reply
Duncan2012
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#10
Report 6 months ago
#10
Go for it. Your circumstances have changed and this would be a great opportunity. Good luck.
2
reply
silencespeaks
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#11
Report 6 months ago
#11
It’s a great opportunity. The majority of your time will be spent working, you just have to try and keep on top of your work.
It’s a competitive field so it’ll likely be beneficial in future, plus it’s being funded on your behalf.

Personally, I think furthering your education is great when you’re young and don’t have the responsibilities that come with adulthood at a later stage i.e. children, mortgages etc.

All the best 😊
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Birmingham
    Postgraduate Open Day Postgraduate
    Wed, 20 Mar '19
  • King's College London
    Postgraduate Taught Courses - Arts & Sciences - Strand Campus Postgraduate
    Wed, 20 Mar '19
  • University of East Anglia
    All Departments Open 13:00-17:00. Find out more about our diverse range of subject areas and career progression in the Arts & Humanities, Social Sciences, Medicine & Health Sciences, and the Sciences. Postgraduate
    Wed, 20 Mar '19

Where do you need more help?

Which Uni should I go to? (59)
15.17%
How successful will I become if I take my planned subjects? (38)
9.77%
How happy will I be if I take this career? (74)
19.02%
How do I achieve my dream Uni placement? (59)
15.17%
What should I study to achieve my dream career? (43)
11.05%
How can I be the best version of myself? (116)
29.82%

Watched Threads

View All