randomsheep11
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Hi folks I'm back with another question.


Would anyone be able to clarify what the differences are between the degrees that I've stated above? Which has the best career prospects? Which is the most respected degree?

From what I believe, Medicinal Chemists make the compounds, Pharmacologists test how these affect the body, and Pharmaceutical scientists are something in between??????


I'm interested because I was having a gander at some highly interesting YouYube videos, where a Pharmacist was explaining about product he made, what delivery mechanism was used, how these substances interacted with receptors on the cell and lots of other highly intruiging stuff.

That's what I find interesting, I fear that one of these degrees would lead to me spending my life doing animal testing or something like that.

P.S I am personally one who would be more than happy to do a Masters or a PHD.

Any thoughts folks?
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randomsheep11
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artful_lounger
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There isn't much need to bump your post twice in a day. It's likely the reason it's not getting many replies is that you've made it in the wrong place - Pharmacy is not Pharmacology or similar subjects, and is a specific allied health profession unto it's own. I've requested this thread be moved to the correct forum (Biological Sciences, for future reference, although Chemistry courses belong in another forum) for you.

Beyond that, as you've noted there is obviously some overlap. In general Pharmacology degrees are more angled towards the bioscience side, considering the physiological mechanisms that the drugs act on, while the Medicinal Chemistry will be much more strongly angled towards the chemistry side, focusing on the synthesis of the compounds. As you say, Pharmaceutical Science courses often fall between the two, but if anything are probably slightly closer to the bioscience than chemistry side.

None of those degrees are clinical though, and all involve the scientific side of the pharmaceutical industry. The Pharmaceutical Science and Pharmacology options could then lead to animal based roles, although not necessarily. As the Medicinal Chemistry will be focused on the production and discovery of the drugs, they won't really be involved in that and will probably work with other chemists and chemical engineers trying to create the compounds to fit the needs of the pharmacologists/pharmaceutical scientists.

That said normally the scientist doesn't administer drugs to animals, qualified animal technicians do; the scientists just design the experiment, working out how they are going to be testing that x drug has y effect and z side effects, and then analyse the results and figure out how this shapes the theory (i.e. they do science, not animal husbandry). There may be reseach at the PhD level and above which is clinically focused however, where you will work with physicians and surgeons in developing clinical trials for things for example, or doing basic science research to support a clinical objective - but this will still be lab based (and depending on the stage may involve animal testing).

If you wish to dispense drugs to patients, then you want a degree in Pharmacy - which as above, is a whole other area, although you'll cover a fair amount of similar material to the Pharmacology courses, but more focused on the medical aspects. There are also medical specialties in Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics and in Pharmaceutical Medicine, however these require a medical degree naturally.
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randomsheep11
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
There isn't much need to bump your post twice in a day. It's likely the reason it's not getting many replies is that you've made it in the wrong place - Pharmacy is not Pharmacology or similar subjects, and is a specific allied health profession unto it's own. I've requested this thread be moved to the correct forum (Biological Sciences, for future reference, although Chemistry courses belong in another forum) for you.

Beyond that, as you've noted there is obviously some overlap. In general Pharmacology degrees are more angled towards the bioscience side, considering the physiological mechanisms that the drugs act on, while the Medicinal Chemistry will be much more strongly angled towards the chemistry side, focusing on the synthesis of the compounds. As you say, Pharmaceutical Science courses often fall between the two, but if anything are probably slightly closer to the bioscience than chemistry side.

None of those degrees are clinical though, and all involve the scientific side of the pharmaceutical industry. The Pharmaceutical Science and Pharmacology options could then lead to animal based roles, although not necessarily. As the Medicinal Chemistry will be focused on the production and discovery of the drugs, they won't really be involved in that and will probably work with other chemists and chemical engineers trying to create the compounds to fit the needs of the pharmacologists/pharmaceutical scientists.

That said normally the scientist doesn't administer drugs to animals, qualified animal technicians do; the scientists just design the experiment, working out how they are going to be testing that x drug has y effect and z side effects, and then analyse the results and figure out how this shapes the theory (i.e. they do science, not animal husbandry). There may be reseach at the PhD level and above which is clinically focused however, where you will work with physicians and surgeons in developing clinical trials for things for example, or doing basic science research to support a clinical objective - but this will still be lab based (and depending on the stage may involve animal testing).

If you wish to dispense drugs to patients, then you want a degree in Pharmacy - which as above, is a whole other area, although you'll cover a fair amount of similar material to the Pharmacology courses, but more focused on the medical aspects. There are also medical specialties in Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics and in Pharmaceutical Medicine, however these require a medical degree naturally.
Hmm, I guess Medicinal Chemistry sunds the most interesting. Thanks for the help!
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