That1Nerd
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I think my most likely options for a level are:
Biology
Art
English literature

This is judged by my enjoyment of the subject and my GCSE results.

Is this combination OK, bearing in mind I have no idea what I want to do in the future

Thanks for your help.
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thlhfk
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Hey, I think that’s a relatively good combination of subjects. English is a facilitating subject (as is Maths) which essentially means that you can get onto pretty much any Uni course with a good enough grade. Biology will push you more towards a practical course, and Art shows that you’re versatile! This combination sort of has criminology/forensic science/csi vibes to me, if that’s something you’d possibly be interested in? )
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That1Nerd
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(Original post by thlhfk)
Hey, I think that’s a relatively good combination of subjects. English is a facilitating subject (as is Maths) which essentially means that you can get onto pretty much any Uni course with a good enough grade. Biology will push you more towards a practical course, and Art shows that you’re versatile! This combination sort of has criminology/forensic science/csi vibes to me, if that’s something you’d possibly be interested in? )
Never thought of going towards a forensics route although that would require chemistry wouldn’t it. Doesn’t it seem like a “Hollywood-fantasy” type scenario?
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thlhfk
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(Original post by That1Nerd)
Never thought of going towards a forensics route although that would require chemistry wouldn’t it. Doesn’t it seem like a “Hollywood-fantasy” type scenario?
It depends, I guess- forensic anthropologists, entemologists, mineralogists, botanists etc wouldn’t necessarily need chemistry? These careers could help in areas such as research or crime fighting, which are both pretty admirable jobs to have...
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Shushaxx
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Biology is heavily content based and application but if you’ve enjoyed biology at gcse you’ll enjoy it at a level it just requires more work xx
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by That1Nerd)
Never thought of going towards a forensics route although that would require chemistry wouldn’t it. Doesn’t it seem like a “Hollywood-fantasy” type scenario?
Not sure where the prior poster's maths comment came from...that aside, forensic science isn't really a major industry. I think the net requriement for the UK necessitates about 1000 full time forensic science technicians? However the advent of popular crime TV shows focusing on it means a lot of people are trying to go into that area, and a lot of "CSI degrees" - bear in mind, people went into that field before those degrees existed, which tells you something about the need for them. A Chemistry degree would probably be the most common prelude to a career in that area...

In terms of your options, they're fine for non-STEM subjects, but you'll find your options for STEM degrees very limited (mainly to organismal oriented bioscience degrees, like Zoology, Plant Sciences, Ecology/Conservation type courses). Many STEM courses require two STEM subjects, and many bioscience degrees that don't fall into the above category (and a few that do) require Chemistry as well as Biology. However, there are many such courses which are available with a foundation year, wherein you'll cover the Chemistry content (and other material usually) in a preliminary "year 0" before moving into the main degree programme as usual. As such it's not a critical issue if you change your mind, just bear in mind if this is your aim then it may be better to pursue that to begin with.

However Biology alone can be useful background for e.g. Psychology, Anthropology/Archaeology/Human Sciences and similar subjects. It's also a traditionally academic subject so considered suitable preparation for any general academic degree (for example the above, as well as e.g. Law or similar).

The above assumes you'll be applying to a degree though, which of course is not necessarily the case. However if you are going to be applying to school leaver roles or apprenticeships normally the subjects you've taken don't matter so much as having done them in the first place.
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That1Nerd
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Not sure where the prior poster's maths comment came from...that aside, forensic science isn't really a major industry. I think the net requriement for the UK necessitates about 1000 full time forensic science technicians? However the advent of popular crime TV shows focusing on it means a lot of people are trying to go into that area, and a lot of "CSI degrees" - bear in mind, people went into that field before those degrees existed, which tells you something about the need for them. A Chemistry degree would probably be the most common prelude to a career in that area...

In terms of your options, they're fine for non-STEM subjects, but you'll find your options for STEM degrees very limited (mainly to organismal oriented bioscience degrees, like Zoology, Plant Sciences, Ecology/Conservation type courses). Many STEM courses require two STEM subjects, and many bioscience degrees that don't fall into the above category (and a few that do) require Chemistry as well as Biology. However, there are many such courses which are available with a foundation year, wherein you'll cover the Chemistry content (and other material usually) in a preliminary "year 0" before moving into the main degree programme as usual. As such it's not a critical issue if you change your mind, just bear in mind if this is your aim then it may be better to pursue that to begin with.

However Biology alone can be useful background for e.g. Psychology, Anthropology/Archaeology/Human Sciences and similar subjects. It's also a traditionally academic subject so considered suitable preparation for any general academic degree (for example the above, as well as e.g. Law or similar).

The above assumes you'll be applying to a degree though, which of course is not necessarily the case. However if you are going to be applying to school leaver roles or apprenticeships normally the subjects you've taken don't matter so much as having done them in the first place.
So you’re from the other conversation then ;D
I was only considering maths that’s why I asked,
Anyways what about my combination as a whole?
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by That1Nerd)
Anyways what about my combination as a whole?
I answered that in my post...
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That1Nerd
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
I answered that in my post...
You mainly focused on biology, and I don’t intend to go into forensics

I’ll take into account what you said about it though
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by That1Nerd)
You mainly focused on biology, and I don’t intend to go into forensics

I’ll take into account what you said about it though
If you don't know what you want to do, how can anyone else? Your subject combination is fine for some things and not for others. That's about as specific as I can get...mainly that, for STEM subjects, it's better to take more of them in combination to pursue something in that area.

If you have a more specific question ("is my combination suitable for x course") then I could probably offer more advice, but you need to do some research for yourself into what possible courses you may want to apply to in future - I can't do that for you.
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NeoWong
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Take maths, it goes with everything

I have seen art degrees asking for A level maths
All the STEM degrees and econ/finance/business value maths too

I think maths gives you the most options if you have zero idea of what to study at uni
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